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  1. #1
    Established Member Two Rings
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    2001 A4 1.8t AWM B5.5 - Timing Belt Tensioner Pully preload adjustment...how to?

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    Water pump started leaking, only about 70k in to the last timing belt job.

    So I took the car apart last night and got the new water pump, belt and tensioner parts on.

    Only thing left to really do is put the preload on the tensioner pully before releasing the tensioner pin.
    What I don't know is how much tension to put on the pully before tightening the nut on the pully to lock it into place.
    I'm don't even have any information about how much torque should be put on the nut that holds the pully on.

    The Service Manual doesn't seem to have a procedure for installing a new pully and properly preloading the pully tension on the timing belt.
    Or at least I haven't found one.

    Does anyone have any information on how to properly do it?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Four Rings VinnysS4's Avatar
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    If I remember correctly, you tension it till you.can fit a 6mm allen/spacer between the tensioner and it's resting position(make sense?)
    Then tighten and release. I believe it requires a 2 pin wrench... it I've done it without.

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  3. #3
    Established Member Two Rings
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    I did my TBelt and etc job, by putting pulley on leave it hanging, put belt around the things in proper way, then you take a 6mm allen key , stick it in the roller then you pull it up enough so you can fit the hydraulic tensioner below it , when thats done, you tighthen the hydraulic tensioner to 10 nm , and the little accessory roller to 25Nm (?) , you take out the safety pin. This will tighten the belt, and when you turn the crank around twice, it will properly tension it and the hyd. tensioner will be fully extended.
    Also you tighthen the timing tensioner pulley nut to 45 Nm if i 'member right.
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  4. #4
    Established Member Two Rings
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    So, if I understand this correctly I need a 6mm gap between the pully flange and the hydraulic tensioner pin?
    I've read somewhere that it should be 6 to 10mm.

    But what about the tension between the pully and the belt?
    If I put a 6mm gap between the pully and tensioner, I'm still left with a floppy belt.
    There is that rotating adjuster on the pully that swings the pully out towards the belt.

    How much tension should be on the belt?
    How does one measure how much pre-tension (i.e. before releasing the tensioner pin) they are putting on the belt?

  5. #5
    Veteran Member Four Rings fR3ZNO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mobildetroit View Post
    So, if I understand this correctly I need a 6mm gap between the pully flange and the hydraulic tensioner pin.
    I've read somewhere that it should be 6 to 10mm.

    But what about the tension between the pully and the belt?
    If I put a 6mm gap between the pully and tensioner, I'm still left with a floppy belt.
    There is that rotating adjuster on the pully that swings the pully out towards the belt.

    How much tension should be on the belt?
    How does one measure how much pre-tension (i.e. before releasing the tensioner pin) they are putting on the belt?
    This PDF does a very good job explaining how to adjust the gap on the tensioner. Clicky Clickô

    Before you start tensioning the belt, you want the run of the belt that goes from the cam pulley to the water pump to the crank pulley to be tight. You should only have slack in the portion between the cam pulley, tensioner and the crank. (see step 24 on the PDF)
    "If one does not fail at times, then one has not challenged himself." - Ferdinand Porsche

  6. #6
    Established Member Two Rings
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    On 058 engines if you put Tbelt on correctly, with hanging roller, then you pull up the pulley to fit the hyd. tensioner its automatically gonna tighthen the belt to proper tension. Anyway Tbelts shouldnt be ultra mega tight, but enough to to not fall off the cam lol.
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  7. #7
    Established Member Two Rings
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    Ya, I was thinking it just needs to be enough tension so the belt can't flop over the lip on the tensioner pully.
    Then 6mm between pully and tensioner pin and let the pin do the remainder of the tensioning.

    My engine is an AWM with a B5.5 vin.

  8. #8
    Established Member Two Rings
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    Quote Originally Posted by fR3ZNO View Post
    This PDF does a very good job explaining how to adjust the gap on the tensioner. Clicky Clickô

    Before you start tensioning the belt, you want the run of the belt that goes from the cam pulley to the water pump to the crank pulley to be tight. You should only have slack in the portion between the cam pulley, tensioner and the crank. (see step 24 on the PDF)
    Ya I'm good on tension between the toothed pullies, no slack.

  9. #9
    Established Member Two Rings
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    Quote Originally Posted by fR3ZNO View Post
    This PDF does a very good job explaining how to adjust the gap on the tensioner. Clicky Clickô

    Before you start tensioning the belt, you want the run of the belt that goes from the cam pulley to the water pump to the crank pulley to be tight. You should only have slack in the portion between the cam pulley, tensioner and the crank. (see step 24 on the PDF)
    ....and yes that PDF gives me a better idea of what is expected. I was also wondering what that allen socket hole on the pully was for. This is the first documented account of using it for something that I have come across.

  10. #10
    Veteran Member Four Rings walky_talky20's Avatar
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    This is why the updated Litens tensioner is the stuff. Spring-loaded (not hydro). Line up the marks. Tighten. Done.

    The eccentric hydro setup is my least favorite setup because it requires some familiarity and skill to get it set correctly. Worrying about getting it set correctly is pretty much last thing a DIY'er wants when doing their first t-belt job.

    That said, the ECS guide explains it fairly well. They kind of skip over the "hold on tight when you pull the hydro pin" part, but other than that, it shows the important parts.
    ^Don't listen to this guy, he's not even a mechanic.
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  11. #11
    Established Member Two Rings
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    Quote Originally Posted by walky_talky20 View Post
    This is why the updated Litens tensioner is the stuff. Spring-loaded (not hydro). Line up the marks. Tighten. Done.

    The eccentric hydro setup is my least favorite setup because it requires some familiarity and skill to get it set correctly. Worrying about getting it set correctly is pretty much last thing a DIY'er wants when doing their first t-belt job.

    That said, the ECS guide explains it fairly well. They kind of skip over the "hold on tight when you pull the hydro pin" part, but other than that, it shows the important parts.
    Do you think it would make sense to use a tensioner compression tool to hold the pully down, release the pin, then back out the compression tool until there is a 8mm gap, then rotate the pully out to take up belt slack before torquing the nut on the pully?

  12. #12
    Veteran Member Four Rings walky_talky20's Avatar
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    No. You use the pliers (or other method) to hold the eccentric adjuster maxed out, pushing against the hydro. Then pull the hydro pin, and slowly let out the eccentric until you reach about 6mm. Then tighten the nut.

    Yes, this takes like 3 hands to do.
    ^Don't listen to this guy, he's not even a mechanic.
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  13. #13
    Established Member Two Rings
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    Ok, so the point about snugging the nut is to hold the pully so the tensioner pin, when released, doesn't go fully extended. This is why I was wondering if using the compression tool might make this a bit easier. The eccentric adjustment just slides the pully out towards the belt. But if the compression tool is on, the pully flang that the compression piston meets would always be held at 8mm. But the pully eccentric adjustment should still be able to rotate the pully out. No?

  14. #14
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    I did my V6 2.8 last year and followed these instructions. The rest isnít relevant since you have a single cam but I think the tensioner part is the same:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/jav1lnnkvg...47.02.png?dl=0

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/3aehb74vqr...47.17.png?dl=0

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/ejowh91ujm...47.23.png?dl=0



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  15. #15
    Veteran Member Four Rings fR3ZNO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by walky_talky20 View Post
    This is why the updated Litens tensioner is the stuff. Spring-loaded (not hydro). Line up the marks. Tighten. Done.

    The eccentric hydro setup is my least favorite setup because it requires some familiarity and skill to get it set correctly. Worrying about getting it set correctly is pretty much last thing a DIY'er wants when doing their first t-belt job.

    That said, the ECS guide explains it fairly well. They kind of skip over the "hold on tight when you pull the hydro pin" part, but other than that, it shows the important parts.
    x2

    I was gonna mention the updated tensioner but I figured he's this deep into the T-belt may as well help out with what he has, lol.

    The updated tensioner is definitely the bee's knees. Installed it on two 1.8T's already and it is so much easier than the hydro setup.
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  16. #16
    Veteran Member Four Rings
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    Quote Originally Posted by fR3ZNO View Post
    x2

    I was gonna mention the updated tensioner but I figured he's this deep into the T-belt may as well help out with what he has, lol.

    The updated tensioner is definitely the bee's knees. Installed it on two 1.8T's already and it is so much easier than the hydro setup.
    Same here (2x times with Litens tensioner).
    I have tended to undo and re-do the Litens tension setup just because it's so easy.
    Each time I've done the old hydraulic setup, I've had to re-do it a couple times because it's that difficult (relatively).
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  17. #17
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    Can you find / is that tensioner available in Europe ? Might be worth looking into 80000 Km from now on :D
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  18. #18
    Veteran Member Four Rings
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blazius View Post
    Can you find / is that tensioner available in Europe ? Might be worth looking into 80000 Km from now on :D
    It's only for 06A block.
    But the P/Ns are 06A109181 & 06A109243A
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalMan View Post
    It's only for 06A block.
    But the P/Ns are 06A109181 & 06A109243A
    That sucks.
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  20. #20
    Veteran Member Four Rings fR3ZNO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetalMan View Post
    It's only for 06A block.
    But the P/Ns are 06A109181 & 06A109243A
    Yep, couldn't find the updated tensioner kit on Blauparts when I did the TB on my ATW (058)
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  21. #21
    Veteran Member Four Rings walky_talky20's Avatar
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    Yep, 06A block only. This is because it's just borrowing the tensioner design from the 2.0T FSI. It's an easy retrofit to replace the fiddly "late" 06A eccentric system, so they did it.
    ^Don't listen to this guy, he's not even a mechanic.
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  22. #22
    Established Member Two Rings
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    So I set the tensioner pulley last night. The instructions say move clockwise when setting tension...but what needed to be noted is that you need to go counterclockwise before releasing the tensioner pin so the pulley doesn't go beyond 10mm gap, then move clockwise until you have the desired gap then torque it down. I ended up setting it closer to 9mm, figured that was good enough and then torqued it down, didn't want to bother recompressing it and starting over. Tension is good and all my marks line up after manual rotation test.

    Of course I'm not done yet because it's an Audi and there is always two or three other unrelated things that need to be fixed at the same time...so expecting to get that finished up tonight and get the bitch fired. I think I'm in good shape otherwise, thanks for the input everyone! :)

  23. #23
    Veteran Member Four Rings walky_talky20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mobildetroit View Post
    The instructions say move clockwise when setting tension...but what needed to be noted is that you need to go counterclockwise before releasing the tensioner pin so the pulley doesn't go beyond 10mm gap, then move clockwise until you have the desired gap then torque it down.


    Yep. This is what I meant by ECS "skipped a step". And where I described having to "hold the eccentric adjuster maxed out (meaning counter-clockwise), pushing against the hydro. Then pull the hydro pin, and slowly let out (meaning clockwise) the eccentric". That was probably hard to understand. The eccentric tensioner process really needs a good video demonstration to fully explain, I think.
    ^Don't listen to this guy, he's not even a mechanic.
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  24. #24
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    I agree.

    This is how I did it. This assumes there are no current issues with engine timing and you have no cam/crank seal leaks. Also this assumes you do the basics like put the car into service mode and prepare for the things you will be removing.

    1. Bring engine to TDC clockwise and verify crank and cam pulley marks line up with the TDC indicator on the valve cover and crank pulley cover plate.
    2. Took all the cover plates off
    3. Removed the crank pulley
    4. Used a paint pen to mark crank pulley to block mark for TDC reference.
    5. Used a paint pen to mark belt to crank pulley relationship
    6. Used a paint pen to mark belt to cam pully relationship
    7. Unbolted tensioner piston bracket, tensionor pulley and water pump (this is fun because I didn't tell you to drain the coolant first and now you have a bunch of coolant all over the floor of your garage or on your front lawn if you are the kind of person who likes to work on their cars in the front yard. I drained my coolant first because I don't like working on a wet floor)
    8. Lubricated new water pump oring with new 100% strength coolant
    9. placed water pump in hole and evenly hand tightened the three water pump bolts.
    10. tightened each water pump bolt a few turns each so pump was pulled into the water pump hole evenly and so not to distort or rip the oring (was to tight to push in by hand safely). Snug the bolts good, there is likely a torque spec for this...but I don't care, I fucking hate this car.
    11. transferred paint marks on old timing belt to new timing belt
    12. coated the tensioner pulley stud with a light coat of oil and put the pulley on with washer and nut and snug it so the pulley adjuster still moves but the nut is not freely loose.
    13. put new timing belt on so the paint marks lined up exactly on cam and crank pulley's, dicked with the belt a bit by rocking the crank back and forth a hair, making sure to keep the paint marks lined up. Once the belt is on the paint marks rotate crank pully back to TDC mark you put on it in step 5...if you didn't you will have to pull a plug and do a TDC find to ensure you are at TDC...not going to talk about how to do that here because you followed step 5 right?
    14. put a zip tie on the cam pulley to hold the belt in place
    15. bolted on new tensioner piston bracket and worked the belt into place on the idler pulley and tensioner pulley
    16. used a pair of needlenose pliers with angled pier ends on the pulley adjuster
    17. hold pulley adjuster counter clockwise so the pulley flange is down on top of the tensioner piston bracket
    18. release the tensioner piston pin while holding the pully adjuster counter clockwise, then move clockwise until the space between the pulley flange and the surface of the tensioner piston surface is 8mm, then tighten the pulley nut and torque to spec (I think it was 27nm but double check).
    19. Remove the zip tie on your cam pulley because your not that adventurous.
    20. with a ratchet on the crank pulley, rotate the engine clockwise slowly to ensure the timing marks line up after a full revolution, feel free to do it as many times as you want until you realize once was enough. What you are looking for is mechanical hard impassible resistance (don't try to pass it, just hold pressure on lightly to make sure it's not just compression back pressure). Go slow so cylinders have time to bleed off pressure....but if the pressure never bleeds off you could have a valve hitting a piston...but if you do you are way way off on timing and that should have been obvious to you when you started.....or not if you have a sheared pin on the crank or cam pulley....and if you do that's a whole other set of instructions.
    21. if that's all good then do all the other normal stuff you need to do to put your car back together....like put coolant back in, etc...
    Last edited by mobildetroit; 12-05-2018 at 03:08 PM.



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