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  1. #1
    Active Member Two Rings
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    in the market for an s5 v8

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    Hello guys,

    i am currently looking at a s5 v8 with 60k mileage. I searched up couple of threads regarding the reliability of this car but not as much information as i wanted. If you guys don't mind giving me some more specific answers, it would be lovely.\

    What should i look out for when i take a look at the car? i am seeing the car on saturday.

    I know carbon build up is a problem, how do you tell?

    What are some of the repairs that you guys have encountered, and how much did it cost you?\

    Thank you for your time.

  2. #2
    Established Member Three Rings Sazexa's Avatar
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    Jul 15 2017
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    2015 Scion FR-S
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    Connecticut

    I bought an '09 S5 V8, with around 87K on the clock at the time of purchase. I also worked at an Audi dealership, so, I'll try to list off some common problems, in no particular order.

    Common issues:

    - Carbon build up. If you have an excess of carbon build up, you'll notice your car has a rougher start up and idle, and will feel sluggish for it's "355 HP 325 TQ" factory rating. The pedal will be a little delayed/not-so-responsive, and you'll likely receive gas mileage below 20 MPG's for combined, or likely below the 24 range for extended highway driving. Sometimes this can lead to misfires, across random cylinders as well. The remedy to this is a cleaning, ranging as low as I've seen $600 upwards of $1,700, depending on where you go. Changing oil at "half life", say 5,000 miles, getting a catch can, and using the highest grade fuel available to you (or at least up to 95 Octane) is the best combination of ways to prevent it accumulating again. This is typically the biggest problem these cars face. Automatics seem to be a bit more prone, as they are generally driven at lower RPM's. My S5 has 97K on it now, and I know it could use a cleaning, but, it still runs smooth so far. *knock on wood*

    - High pressure fuel pumps can go bad for many cars at higher mileage. You'll likely receive and EPC light, or the car going into a "safe mode," or as I dub it "limp-dick mode" . For used or aftermarket ones you can find them pretty cheap, or just use the opportunity to buy better performing sets from tuners if that's your thing. I think these typically go bad around 100-120K for most people that it happens to. Changing them out yourself is relatively easy, only requires a few wrenches and maybe 15 minutes at most, and that's for those who are your average DIY mechanics. This will likely only really be noticeable when in the higher RPM range or accelerating very hard when they become an issue.

    - Thermostats. The thermostats on these cars around 70K-90K can generally get stuck open or closed, and most people catch it in-time. If you have some tools, some vehicle ramps, and some determination, doing it yourself should only cost around $150 if you just buy a new thermostat (which comes with a new housing and gasket as well) and is pretty straight forward to replace. Being at the front driverside of the engine on the bottom. In my instance, I did not realize my thermostat had stuck open. This led to car overheating, but the primary cooling fan automatically compensated and I hadn't know for a while. Eventually my cooling fan burned itself out trying to keep up with the increased heat load. That was expensive, but, from my understand an incredibly rare occurrence. To check for this issue, once the car is at operating temp, listen for the primary cooling fans. If they are blowing very loudly at idle when not driven hard, it likely needs a thermostat.

    - Front control arm bushings/ball joints. These tend to go bad at around the same mileage as the thermostat, in the 70-90K mileage range. The front controls arms all have rubber bushings. The factory ones tend to wear out around this mileage, and can cause very strong wheel vibrations for vehicles going 65 MPH or more. Almost to the point of feeling like an unbalanced wheel. Replacing these with factory replacements and from a shop can get pretty darn pricey, but, again, if you're good with a wrench (or perhaps know someone who is) and do some smart shopping it can be done relatively inexpensive. I went with an aftermarket set for my car made by 034MotorSports. It uses a stiffer/stronger grade of rubber, and is a whole kit with new control arms as well. It cost me $500, and about five hours of time to install for both front ends (on a car lift in my father's shop.)

    - Oil filter housing gaskets. On the stock cars, the oil filter housings have a leg that goes underneath the intake manifold. This gasket leaks eventually, usually around 75K I believe they start leaking. To replace this is a bit of a hassle, as it involves removing the intake manifold. If you're not completely draining out oil, I'd say wait. I fixed this myself and just to get to it and fix it it was about six hours to disassemble, fix, and reassemble. If you're getting the engine carbon-cleaned, that's the perfect time to get this gasket replaced as the intake manifold will be off anyways.

    - Probably the least common of the common issues is a sticky clutch. After age and mileage, typically around 100-120K I believe it is, either the slave cylinder or slave cylinder line for the clutches can fail. This causes a loss of hydraulic pressure in the clutch actuation, and results in your clutch pedal sticking to the floor. Mine happened to me a bit prematurely, at around 96.5K miles. Another relatively simple repair, Audi OEM part goes for around $160 (or with some shopping, I bought a brand new one for $35.) Takes about fifteen minutes to replace yourself, and if you have a friend you can bleed the line and be back on the road in perhaps as little as 30-45 minutes. The biggest sign of this, for me anyways, was that my clutch pedal suddenly got significantly lighter or easier to press in. Then about half a mile from my house, I pushed in the clutch, and when I let off the pedal, it stayed stuck to the floor.

    Far less common issues:
    These ones come very infrequently to a small percentage of owners, but enough where it's still a bit of a "known" issue.

    - Squeeky windows. It seems that the rubber that was used in the B8 S5's for the window seal sometimes have a squeel or squeek, I believe it mostly happens only in colder and dryer weather. I don't know of a remedy.

    - Door lock actuators can fail very infrequently. Removing and working with the door card is a bit of a pain, and the actuator cost around $200 if I'm not mistaken. I've experienced this.

    - Coolant hose failures (one specific hose generally, towards the back end of the engine and coolant reservoir.) As well as often small fractures in the coolant tank causing a slow loss of coolant over time. Generally it's small enough to not set off alarms and just require being topped off at oil changes. The hose is priced around $70, and the tank is around $120 I believe.

    - EVAP solenoids fail infrequently. Easy to replace, just two tubes, and I think they're relatively cheap.

    - Injectors "leaking" (from my understanding incredibly rare) and/or failing, but if that happens I believe it's generally far beyond 120K miles. Injectors are very expensive for this car, ranging from $100 to $200ish per injector, plus another $50 per injector for a kit of seals for them. If you suspect or think you should replace your injectors, a good time would be at a carbon cleaning.

    - Regarding recalls, I think certain S5's had one on a clutch throw out bearing. Certain ones currently have a recall for catalytic converters.

    - Some cars experience intermittent issues with the electronic parking brake because of wire corrosion.

    - Very small oil leaks occasionally with valve cover gaskets.

    I think that's mostly it. I could be missing a few things, but, I think those are the most important. At 60K miles, it's a good spot to buy the car and enjoy it before it will need "some work." Certainly look at it's service records. If they haven't been done already, I'd say consider new sparkplugs and ignitions coils at 75 or 80K wouldn't hurt. A new air filter then as well. Aside from that, and changing the oil a bit early on, using higher grade gas, for the most part the car should be good to you. I've done a fair bit of service on mine from the previous owner neglecting a bit of it. But I don't regret any of it. My favorite car I've ever owned.
    034Motorsport: Control arms, intake tube, aluminum trans. brace and mount, rear sway bar, strut mounts || JHM: "solid" short throw shifter and shifter linkage || ST: "X" coilovers || K&N E-1987 air filter || RS style: center and foglight grilles || custom downpipe-back exhaust with A5 S-Line rear valence 4" tips || OEM 19" x 8.5" stock wheels powder-coated black with 15 front/20mm rear spacers

  3. #3
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Jan 10 2018
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    412307
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    ny

    Quote Originally Posted by Sazexa View Post
    I bought an '09 S5 V8, with around 87K on the clock at the time of purchase. I also worked at an Audi dealership, so, I'll try to list off some common problems, in no particular order.

    Common issues:

    - Carbon build up. If you have an excess of carbon build up, you'll notice your car has a rougher start up and idle, and will feel sluggish for it's "355 HP 325 TQ" factory rating. The pedal will be a little delayed/not-so-responsive, and you'll likely receive gas mileage below 20 MPG's for combined, or likely below the 24 range for extended highway driving. Sometimes this can lead to misfires, across random cylinders as well. The remedy to this is a cleaning, ranging as low as I've seen $600 upwards of $1,700, depending on where you go. Changing oil at "half life", say 5,000 miles, getting a catch can, and using the highest grade fuel available to you (or at least up to 95 Octane) is the best combination of ways to prevent it accumulating again. This is typically the biggest problem these cars face. Automatics seem to be a bit more prone, as they are generally driven at lower RPM's. My S5 has 97K on it now, and I know it could use a cleaning, but, it still runs smooth so far. *knock on wood*

    - High pressure fuel pumps can go bad for many cars at higher mileage. You'll likely receive and EPC light, or the car going into a "safe mode," or as I dub it "limp-dick mode" . For used or aftermarket ones you can find them pretty cheap, or just use the opportunity to buy better performing sets from tuners if that's your thing. I think these typically go bad around 100-120K for most people that it happens to. Changing them out yourself is relatively easy, only requires a few wrenches and maybe 15 minutes at most, and that's for those who are your average DIY mechanics. This will likely only really be noticeable when in the higher RPM range or accelerating very hard when they become an issue.

    - Thermostats. The thermostats on these cars around 70K-90K can generally get stuck open or closed, and most people catch it in-time. If you have some tools, some vehicle ramps, and some determination, doing it yourself should only cost around $150 if you just buy a new thermostat (which comes with a new housing and gasket as well) and is pretty straight forward to replace. Being at the front driverside of the engine on the bottom. In my instance, I did not realize my thermostat had stuck open. This led to car overheating, but the primary cooling fan automatically compensated and I hadn't know for a while. Eventually my cooling fan burned itself out trying to keep up with the increased heat load. That was expensive, but, from my understand an incredibly rare occurrence. To check for this issue, once the car is at operating temp, listen for the primary cooling fans. If they are blowing very loudly at idle when not driven hard, it likely needs a thermostat.

    - Front control arm bushings/ball joints. These tend to go bad at around the same mileage as the thermostat, in the 70-90K mileage range. The front controls arms all have rubber bushings. The factory ones tend to wear out around this mileage, and can cause very strong wheel vibrations for vehicles going 65 MPH or more. Almost to the point of feeling like an unbalanced wheel. Replacing these with factory replacements and from a shop can get pretty darn pricey, but, again, if you're good with a wrench (or perhaps know someone who is) and do some smart shopping it can be done relatively inexpensive. I went with an aftermarket set for my car made by 034MotorSports. It uses a stiffer/stronger grade of rubber, and is a whole kit with new control arms as well. It cost me $500, and about five hours of time to install for both front ends (on a car lift in my father's shop.)

    - Oil filter housing gaskets. On the stock cars, the oil filter housings have a leg that goes underneath the intake manifold. This gasket leaks eventually, usually around 75K I believe they start leaking. To replace this is a bit of a hassle, as it involves removing the intake manifold. If you're not completely draining out oil, I'd say wait. I fixed this myself and just to get to it and fix it it was about six hours to disassemble, fix, and reassemble. If you're getting the engine carbon-cleaned, that's the perfect time to get this gasket replaced as the intake manifold will be off anyways.

    - Probably the least common of the common issues is a sticky clutch. After age and mileage, typically around 100-120K I believe it is, either the slave cylinder or slave cylinder line for the clutches can fail. This causes a loss of hydraulic pressure in the clutch actuation, and results in your clutch pedal sticking to the floor. Mine happened to me a bit prematurely, at around 96.5K miles. Another relatively simple repair, Audi OEM part goes for around $160 (or with some shopping, I bought a brand new one for $35.) Takes about fifteen minutes to replace yourself, and if you have a friend you can bleed the line and be back on the road in perhaps as little as 30-45 minutes. The biggest sign of this, for me anyways, was that my clutch pedal suddenly got significantly lighter or easier to press in. Then about half a mile from my house, I pushed in the clutch, and when I let off the pedal, it stayed stuck to the floor.

    Far less common issues:
    These ones come very infrequently to a small percentage of owners, but enough where it's still a bit of a "known" issue.

    - Squeeky windows. It seems that the rubber that was used in the B8 S5's for the window seal sometimes have a squeel or squeek, I believe it mostly happens only in colder and dryer weather. I don't know of a remedy.

    - Door lock actuators can fail very infrequently. Removing and working with the door card is a bit of a pain, and the actuator cost around $200 if I'm not mistaken. I've experienced this.

    - Coolant hose failures (one specific hose generally, towards the back end of the engine and coolant reservoir.) As well as often small fractures in the coolant tank causing a slow loss of coolant over time. Generally it's small enough to not set off alarms and just require being topped off at oil changes. The hose is priced around $70, and the tank is around $120 I believe.

    - EVAP solenoids fail infrequently. Easy to replace, just two tubes, and I think they're relatively cheap.

    - Injectors "leaking" (from my understanding incredibly rare) and/or failing, but if that happens I believe it's generally far beyond 120K miles. Injectors are very expensive for this car, ranging from $100 to $200ish per injector, plus another $50 per injector for a kit of seals for them. If you suspect or think you should replace your injectors, a good time would be at a carbon cleaning.

    - Regarding recalls, I think certain S5's had one on a clutch throw out bearing. Certain ones currently have a recall for catalytic converters.

    - Some cars experience intermittent issues with the electronic parking brake because of wire corrosion.

    - Very small oil leaks occasionally with valve cover gaskets.

    I think that's mostly it. I could be missing a few things, but, I think those are the most important. At 60K miles, it's a good spot to buy the car and enjoy it before it will need "some work." Certainly look at it's service records. If they haven't been done already, I'd say consider new sparkplugs and ignitions coils at 75 or 80K wouldn't hurt. A new air filter then as well. Aside from that, and changing the oil a bit early on, using higher grade gas, for the most part the car should be good to you. I've done a fair bit of service on mine from the previous owner neglecting a bit of it. But I don't regret any of it. My favorite car I've ever owned.
    Thank you so much for taking your time out to write this, i really do appreciate it!
    Glad to know some of the problems sound like it can be a cheap easy fix if DIY, hopefully i can come across some guides for them.
    Currently the person at the dealership straightforward told me the car has a check engine light because of the intake manifold actuator stuck closed which he said was related to carbon build up in the intake. He said he already did a clean, and he is going to either replace the intake solenoid valvve or replace vacuum lines that lead to the valve. Do any of these sound right to you or anyone on this forum!??

    thank you!

  4. #4
    Established Member Three Rings Sazexa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 15 2017
    AZ Member #
    402904
    My Garage
    2015 Scion FR-S
    Location
    Connecticut

    Quote Originally Posted by KENNYS5 View Post
    Thank you so much for taking your time out to write this, i really do appreciate it!
    Glad to know some of the problems sound like it can be a cheap easy fix if DIY, hopefully i can come across some guides for them.
    Currently the person at the dealership straightforward told me the car has a check engine light because of the intake manifold actuator stuck closed which he said was related to carbon build up in the intake. He said he already did a clean, and he is going to either replace the intake solenoid valvve or replace vacuum lines that lead to the valve. Do any of these sound right to you or anyone on this forum!??

    thank you!
    That's a not-so-common one. And there are two fixes, depending on the intake manifold style. So 2008 and half way through 2009 the cars use a metal intake manifold. This manifold uses electric motors for the actuators and they sometimes burn out or go bad. It's no so common partly because, the vast majority of the S5's don't have these. I believe the motors are located towards the front of the engine and are relatively straight forward to replace. Not sure on cost, but, I think if you search around someone recently posted about that somewhere.

    If it's a mid-2009 or newer, up to 2012, these models use plastic intake manifolds. The plastic intake manifolds use vacuum pressure to actuate these runners. If it has a plastic manifold, check near the front of the engine for hissing (not to be confused with the ticking of the fueling system [also a common "problem," but it's just the design of the engine not a bad thing to hear a constant ticking from the engine]). If you hear something that sounds like a straight forward hissing, or sound of almost like compressed air, there very well may be a vacuum leak, or vacuum line that came off of it's connection.

    The metal intake manifold has sharper edges, and a blocky design, in a very bright silver color. You can see the motor/actuators in the attached image.


    The plastic intake manifold is a gray-ish, kind of green/yellow-ish faded color with smoother and more rounded runners.
    034Motorsport: Control arms, intake tube, aluminum trans. brace and mount, rear sway bar, strut mounts || JHM: "solid" short throw shifter and shifter linkage || ST: "X" coilovers || K&N E-1987 air filter || RS style: center and foglight grilles || custom downpipe-back exhaust with A5 S-Line rear valence 4" tips || OEM 19" x 8.5" stock wheels powder-coated black with 15 front/20mm rear spacers

  5. #5
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
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    ny

    Quote Originally Posted by Sazexa View Post
    That's a not-so-common one. And there are two fixes, depending on the intake manifold style. So 2008 and half way through 2009 the cars use a metal intake manifold. This manifold uses electric motors for the actuators and they sometimes burn out or go bad. It's no so common partly because, the vast majority of the S5's don't have these. I believe the motors are located towards the front of the engine and are relatively straight forward to replace. Not sure on cost, but, I think if you search around someone recently posted about that somewhere.

    If it's a mid-2009 or newer, up to 2012, these models use plastic intake manifolds. The plastic intake manifolds use vacuum pressure to actuate these runners. If it has a plastic manifold, check near the front of the engine for hissing (not to be confused with the ticking of the fueling system [also a common "problem," but it's just the design of the engine not a bad thing to hear a constant ticking from the engine]). If you hear something that sounds like a straight forward hissing, or sound of almost like compressed air, there very well may be a vacuum leak, or vacuum line that came off of it's connection.

    The metal intake manifold has sharper edges, and a blocky design, in a very bright silver color. You can see the motor/actuators in the attached image.


    The plastic intake manifold is a gray-ish, kind of green/yellow-ish faded color with smoother and more rounded runners.
    Well i wouldn't have any idea how to really tell since the dealer is going to be fixing it already, i hope is going to be fine if i do decide to buy the car.

  6. #6
    Established Member Two Rings AWDfreak's Avatar
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    Jun 02 2016
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    Maryland

    Quote Originally Posted by Sazexa View Post
    I bought an '09 S5 V8, with around 87K on the clock at the time of purchase. I also worked at an Audi dealership, so, I'll try to list off some common problems, in no particular order.

    Common issues:

    - Carbon build up. If you have an excess of carbon build up, you'll notice your car has a rougher start up and idle, and will feel sluggish for it's "355 HP 325 TQ" factory rating. The pedal will be a little delayed/not-so-responsive, and you'll likely receive gas mileage below 20 MPG's for combined, or likely below the 24 range for extended highway driving. Sometimes this can lead to misfires, across random cylinders as well. The remedy to this is a cleaning, ranging as low as I've seen $600 upwards of $1,700, depending on where you go. Changing oil at "half life", say 5,000 miles, getting a catch can, and using the highest grade fuel available to you (or at least up to 95 Octane) is the best combination of ways to prevent it accumulating again. This is typically the biggest problem these cars face. Automatics seem to be a bit more prone, as they are generally driven at lower RPM's. My S5 has 97K on it now, and I know it could use a cleaning, but, it still runs smooth so far. *knock on wood*

    - High pressure fuel pumps can go bad for many cars at higher mileage. You'll likely receive and EPC light, or the car going into a "safe mode," or as I dub it "limp-dick mode" . For used or aftermarket ones you can find them pretty cheap, or just use the opportunity to buy better performing sets from tuners if that's your thing. I think these typically go bad around 100-120K for most people that it happens to. Changing them out yourself is relatively easy, only requires a few wrenches and maybe 15 minutes at most, and that's for those who are your average DIY mechanics. This will likely only really be noticeable when in the higher RPM range or accelerating very hard when they become an issue.

    - Thermostats. The thermostats on these cars around 70K-90K can generally get stuck open or closed, and most people catch it in-time. If you have some tools, some vehicle ramps, and some determination, doing it yourself should only cost around $150 if you just buy a new thermostat (which comes with a new housing and gasket as well) and is pretty straight forward to replace. Being at the front driverside of the engine on the bottom. In my instance, I did not realize my thermostat had stuck open. This led to car overheating, but the primary cooling fan automatically compensated and I hadn't know for a while. Eventually my cooling fan burned itself out trying to keep up with the increased heat load. That was expensive, but, from my understand an incredibly rare occurrence. To check for this issue, once the car is at operating temp, listen for the primary cooling fans. If they are blowing very loudly at idle when not driven hard, it likely needs a thermostat.

    - Front control arm bushings/ball joints. These tend to go bad at around the same mileage as the thermostat, in the 70-90K mileage range. The front controls arms all have rubber bushings. The factory ones tend to wear out around this mileage, and can cause very strong wheel vibrations for vehicles going 65 MPH or more. Almost to the point of feeling like an unbalanced wheel. Replacing these with factory replacements and from a shop can get pretty darn pricey, but, again, if you're good with a wrench (or perhaps know someone who is) and do some smart shopping it can be done relatively inexpensive. I went with an aftermarket set for my car made by 034MotorSports. It uses a stiffer/stronger grade of rubber, and is a whole kit with new control arms as well. It cost me $500, and about five hours of time to install for both front ends (on a car lift in my father's shop.)

    - Oil filter housing gaskets. On the stock cars, the oil filter housings have a leg that goes underneath the intake manifold. This gasket leaks eventually, usually around 75K I believe they start leaking. To replace this is a bit of a hassle, as it involves removing the intake manifold. If you're not completely draining out oil, I'd say wait. I fixed this myself and just to get to it and fix it it was about six hours to disassemble, fix, and reassemble. If you're getting the engine carbon-cleaned, that's the perfect time to get this gasket replaced as the intake manifold will be off anyways.

    - Probably the least common of the common issues is a sticky clutch. After age and mileage, typically around 100-120K I believe it is, either the slave cylinder or slave cylinder line for the clutches can fail. This causes a loss of hydraulic pressure in the clutch actuation, and results in your clutch pedal sticking to the floor. Mine happened to me a bit prematurely, at around 96.5K miles. Another relatively simple repair, Audi OEM part goes for around $160 (or with some shopping, I bought a brand new one for $35.) Takes about fifteen minutes to replace yourself, and if you have a friend you can bleed the line and be back on the road in perhaps as little as 30-45 minutes. The biggest sign of this, for me anyways, was that my clutch pedal suddenly got significantly lighter or easier to press in. Then about half a mile from my house, I pushed in the clutch, and when I let off the pedal, it stayed stuck to the floor.

    Far less common issues:
    These ones come very infrequently to a small percentage of owners, but enough where it's still a bit of a "known" issue.

    - Squeeky windows. It seems that the rubber that was used in the B8 S5's for the window seal sometimes have a squeel or squeek, I believe it mostly happens only in colder and dryer weather. I don't know of a remedy.

    - Door lock actuators can fail very infrequently. Removing and working with the door card is a bit of a pain, and the actuator cost around $200 if I'm not mistaken. I've experienced this.

    - Coolant hose failures (one specific hose generally, towards the back end of the engine and coolant reservoir.) As well as often small fractures in the coolant tank causing a slow loss of coolant over time. Generally it's small enough to not set off alarms and just require being topped off at oil changes. The hose is priced around $70, and the tank is around $120 I believe.

    - EVAP solenoids fail infrequently. Easy to replace, just two tubes, and I think they're relatively cheap.

    - Injectors "leaking" (from my understanding incredibly rare) and/or failing, but if that happens I believe it's generally far beyond 120K miles. Injectors are very expensive for this car, ranging from $100 to $200ish per injector, plus another $50 per injector for a kit of seals for them. If you suspect or think you should replace your injectors, a good time would be at a carbon cleaning.

    - Regarding recalls, I think certain S5's had one on a clutch throw out bearing. Certain ones currently have a recall for catalytic converters.

    - Some cars experience intermittent issues with the electronic parking brake because of wire corrosion.

    - Very small oil leaks occasionally with valve cover gaskets.

    I think that's mostly it. I could be missing a few things, but, I think those are the most important. At 60K miles, it's a good spot to buy the car and enjoy it before it will need "some work." Certainly look at it's service records. If they haven't been done already, I'd say consider new sparkplugs and ignitions coils at 75 or 80K wouldn't hurt. A new air filter then as well. Aside from that, and changing the oil a bit early on, using higher grade gas, for the most part the car should be good to you. I've done a fair bit of service on mine from the previous owner neglecting a bit of it. But I don't regret any of it. My favorite car I've ever owned.
    Really great info. Now I know have a better idea what to expect and how to fix. (I have about 35k miles now on my 2012 S5 V8.) Thanks!

    As for squeaky windows, try dry silicon lubricant on the rubber seals. Worked for me on one of my other cars several years ago.
    2012 B8 S5 Prestige 4.2, 6MT, Phantom Black/Black

  7. #7
    Active Member Two Rings
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    this thread should be stickied

  8. #8
    Active Member One Ring
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    Quote Originally Posted by KENNYS5 View Post
    Thank you so much for taking your time out to write this, i really do appreciate it!
    Glad to know some of the problems sound like it can be a cheap easy fix if DIY, hopefully i can come across some guides for them.
    Currently the person at the dealership straightforward told me the car has a check engine light because of the intake manifold actuator stuck closed which he said was related to carbon build up in the intake. He said he already did a clean, and he is going to either replace the intake solenoid valvve or replace vacuum lines that lead to the valve. Do any of these sound right to you or anyone on this forum!??

    thank you!
    My 2010 had this code around 75,000 miles and 6 years old, and it turned out to be several vacuum leaks - relatively cheap and easy to fix.

  9. #9
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Jan 03 2018
    AZ Member #
    411953
    Location
    Cleveland Ohio

    I currently own a 2011 S5 from a one owner in northeast Ohio. About 91k on the clock and the only issues Iíve had are some faulty O2 sensors, carbon build up on the flaps inside the intake (got them cleaned and now working properly). No issues other than that. The control arms are getting there but no issues with steering or the car drifting from left to right. Will probably replace control arms mid summer. Buying used has pros and cons but one used S5 will not be the same as another. Iíve never done the carbon cleaning on the car or know when/if itís ever been done but the car runs great and Iím very happy with my purchase. One thing Iíd recommend doing is getting a good scanner so when codes do pop up you can diagnose and fix yourself. When the 02 sensors were firing off I could of easily done them myself but ended up taking them to a shop because I couldnít diagnose.

  10. #10
    Active Member Two Rings miltondent76's Avatar
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    Jun 14 2015
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    Location
    Chicago

    I've had my '10 S5 4.2 liter v-8 for 4 years now (purchased at Car Max with 39k) with no major issues except for control arms, coolant tank leak and the hose that ties into that tank. I have a slightly rough idle at 91k miles indicating a possible carbon clean, but not a rough enough idle to cause me immediate concern right now. Other than that, 93 octane V-Power from Shell and a few 7k RPM accelerations per tank and she continues to run strong as my daily driver. Good Luck!

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk



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