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  1. #1
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109953
    Location
    UK

    how many hours to change front pads,discs, and brake hoses. A4 1.8t quattro sport

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    Hi all,

    New to the forum, just got an 2000 Quattro sport. Lovely car but needs new front brakes. Before I get ripped off by a dealer. I've found I can get Pagid 288mm disc and pad set for 70 quid, that seem reasonable, and 20 quid for the brake hoses.

    How much should I expect to pay to have these fitted. I'm guessing its only 45 minutes labour for each side?

    any advice would be welcome! :-)

    thanks

  2. #2
    Veteran Member Three Rings
    Join Date
    Jan 06 2013
    AZ Member #
    106990
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI

    Well I live in the United States so I have no idea what rates are in the UK, but I would imagine a bit more expensive than here.

    You can do the job yourself, it is literally a piece of cake. Just do yourself a favor and rent the tool (if thats possible for you in the UK). I did pads and only had to remove one bolt, and then compress the piston, which with the tool took literally 30 seconds.

    If you're doing the pads, you will have to remove the actual pad bracket, which is two bolts that hold it in, then the rotor comes right off and the new one slides back on.

    As far as doing the lines, I've not done it on this car, but I've done it on several other cars. In my experience it's easy if it's just the rubber portion. That usually unscrews from the hard line and can then be replaced.

    You'll need to bleed the brakes if you end up replacing the line.

    If the hose is not torn, then I would not replace it. I've replaced several hoses and in each case it was either an axle broke and twisted the line up and broke it, or something ripped it apart. I've not experienced them just breaking, but I know that it does happen. If your hose is not leaking or damaged then I would just leave it along.

    Swap the pads and rotors, should take no more than an hour if you rent the tool and you will save yourself a ton of $$
    09 Audi A4 2.0t Quattro - Stock - Automatic
    98 Audi A4 1.8t Quattro - Stock - Automatic - AEB

  3. #3
    Veteran Member Four Rings walky_talky20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 30 2008
    AZ Member #
    30427
    Location
    Erie, Pennsylvania

    With the hoses? That is going to entail bleeding the system and such. I'd imagine a dealer will get your for at least 2 hours for all of that.
    ^Don't listen to this guy, he's not even a mechanic.
    2001 Laser Red A4 1.8TQM, 5-Speed Swapped, 4.11 Final Drive, APR 93, R8 coil packs, Labree HFC & DP, 2.5" Exhaust, ST Coilovers, 034 RSB, A8 Brakes Front & Rear, 18" RS4 Reps
    2006 Passion Red Volvo V50 T5 AWD 6MT
    "You need to know what you are doing...Its like a rainbow jungle in there." - Redline380

  4. #4
    Established Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Sep 24 2010
    AZ Member #
    64818
    Location
    Buffalo, NY

    UK inspection is a little more thorough than most US inspections. If it failed for brake hoses, he will have to replace them.

    Pretty easy to do. 50-60 quid should be about right if you don't want to get your hands dirty. The brake lines should be OE. Perform a search there are many how to guides on the web.

  5. #5
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109953
    Location
    UK

    CHeers for the advice guys. Yea the front lines have been an advisory on the last two MOTs as 'worn' but it still passed the MOT. They do look tired. I think once they become quite rigid, they become an advisory incase they start cracking or splitting. Can maybe get away with leaving them for now.

    I'd like to do the work myself but I just don't have the space to work on the car, and outside is a busy highstreet.. damn it..

    So about 2 hours labour. You guys won't believe what Audi charge in the UK now. In London the Audi Main dealer charges 140 + sales tax (VAT) at 20%. So thats 168/hour = $257/hour at todays exchange rate.. I've found a very good independant that will charge $120/ hour.. still expensive though. When I buy my own place a big driveway will be top of the list!!!!

  6. #6
    Veteran Member Three Rings
    Join Date
    Jan 06 2013
    AZ Member #
    106990
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI

    There is no chance in the world that I would pay that amount of money. That doesn't even cover parts. You are looking at a grand. That is outrageous.

    I honestly would do it in the street. Bleeding brakes isn't hard, but you will need somebody in the car to pump the brakes for you. It's actually really easy to do.
    09 Audi A4 2.0t Quattro - Stock - Automatic
    98 Audi A4 1.8t Quattro - Stock - Automatic - AEB

  7. #7
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109953
    Location
    UK

    Quote Originally Posted by 98A4TurboAWD View Post
    There is no chance in the world that I would pay that amount of money. That doesn't even cover parts. You are looking at a grand. That is outrageous.

    I honestly would do it in the street. Bleeding brakes isn't hard, but you will need somebody in the car to pump the brakes for you. It's actually really easy to do.
    tbh, I don't know anyone that pays main dealer prices. They are a rip off, especially in London. I think they just get rich people and old people who don't know any better. I rang up the main dealer, they want 498 inc parts, to change the front discs and pads only... thats = $750... .. From an independant garage looks like I can get pads and discs done for 200 inc parts. ($300).. which is more reasonable I think..

  8. #8
    Active Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109953
    Location
    UK

    been searching for a good price. Pagid seem to be the same as OEM .
    The website is unclear if these will fit my car. Any thoughts?
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...m=350715966126

    a4 b5 2000, 1.8t quattro sport...

  9. #9
    Veteran Member Four Rings nynoah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 16 2006
    AZ Member #
    9725
    My Garage
    01.5 A4 avant Past cars: 95 S6, 85 Golf II VR6, 2 sciroccos, 92 Corrado VR6, 86 Euro BMW 535 Alpina
    Location
    LA CA

    Me personally, I would NEVER do a full brake bleed without a power bleeder. The reason is, on older cars, pump bleeding when doing a full fluid change tends to blow out the master cylinder. This happens when debris gets into the system over time. This debris sits in the master. It is not normally a problem until you bleed them with the pedal method. Which then usually involves the pedal being pushed WAY farther than normal. This causes the internal rubber to come in contact with the debris and causes wear. Usually in 10K miles your master is shot. If you use a power bleeder, this never happens. The best power bleeder is the tank pump style that ECS sells.

    For those reading this, word of advice if you are changing your hoses, do them one at a time and fast to prevent air from going backwards in the system. This can happen from time to time and it usually goes into the ABS system. Which you then must bleed to ABS with a VAG COM and then rebleed the whole system again. Which costs time, money and more fluid. Also start from the passenger rear - to driver rear - to passenger font - then driver side.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Two Rings hanzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 19 2013
    AZ Member #
    109865
    Location
    NE

    Quote Originally Posted by nynoah View Post
    Me personally, I would NEVER do a full brake bleed without a power bleeder. The reason is, on older cars, pump bleeding when doing a full fluid change tends to blow out the master cylinder. This happens when debris gets into the system over time. This debris sits in the master. It is not normally a problem until you bleed them with the pedal method. Which then usually involves the pedal being pushed WAY farther than normal. This causes the internal rubber to come in contact with the debris and causes wear. Usually in 10K miles your master is shot. If you use a power bleeder, this never happens. The best power bleeder is the tank pump style that ECS sells.

    For those reading this, word of advice if you are changing your hoses, do them one at a time and fast to prevent air from going backwards in the system. This can happen from time to time and it usually goes into the ABS system. Which you then must bleed to ABS with a VAG COM and then rebleed the whole system again. Which costs time, money and more fluid. Also start from the passenger rear - to driver rear - to passenger font - then driver side.



    Sound advice, I mainly use is a power bleeder(holds 2 gallons), and sometimes a vacuum bleeder if the reservoir looks shaky.

    BUT when manually bleeding you just don't push the pedal all the way to the floor and you can prevent this.



    Have not seen this mentioned in this thread yet...

    Make sure you crack the bleeder before collapsing the caliper.

    This prevents dirty fluid from being pushed back into the system.

    Also do not hang the caliper by the brake hose!



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