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View Full Version : Replacing OEM Power Steering Line with Stainless?



Knikkz31
03-22-2017, 10:47 AM
So the power steering supply line I just replaced in November blew already, right where the rubber hose goes into the male fitting that is attached to the hard line near the intake manifold. I don't think the manufacturer crimped the end onto the hose nearly well enough. Luckily I have a motorcycle as a method of transportation, but it's still in the 30s here so it's pretty miserable. Unfortunately I have the seemingly unicorn of a '96, so finding the right line for this car involves spending ~$300. I could probably go used as an option if need be. However, I'm wondering if instead of screwing around with these rubber hoses, can I just get some stainless power steering line and the right fittings and replace it? Should I use -6AN? How important is the check valve in the banjo bolt? Would I better off putting the same type of fitting on the end of the new hose so I could still use the banjo bolt?

Here's what I was thinking:
90 elbow off the rack --> female end --> stainless line --> male end --> hard line (with female end on it already) --> pump

Or:
Male to male off the rack --> elbow with female end --> line --> etc.

I would've been better off just deleting the power steering the first time I had a problem with it...

Rodgman15
03-22-2017, 05:04 PM
Absolutely, I don't see why not. Just make sure the hose you buy is pressure rated and can handle the mineral hydraulic oil. If you can get the pitch and size of the banjo bolt I'm sure you could get an adapter fitting.

This is actually a really good idea that I may do just to do lol. I'm a big fan of stainless line and fittings.

Rodgman15
03-22-2017, 06:39 PM
Here's an EXAMPLE of what you could do. Not sure what size you'd want exactly, this one is in 6an. Simple.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/381991012188

Knikkz31
03-23-2017, 02:14 PM
Went to a hydraulic shop today. They're essentially making me custom fittings because the current ones are really odd and aren't common sizes. And they convinced me to not worry about going with stainless, so I'm just getting another rubber line. If for some reason I decide I want stainless down the road, it'd be a cake job now due to them turning the odd fittings into more common ones.

Seerlah
03-23-2017, 03:26 PM
Did you invest proper research into this? On my 1.8T for example the high pressure line can see over 1000psi at idle (not a typo), let alone when the serpentine belt makes the pump turn faster as RPMs increase. And the banjo bolt isn't just a banjo bolt (one on high side at least). One of the banjo bolts on my 1.8T has a built in check valve for it. When my line leaked on me, I opted for a used one on ebay vs an aftermarket one I didn't necessarily trust. Ebay used OEM served me well for maybe 2 years now (since swap). I would personally look into the particulars to see if the option you are choosing will function correctly.

Knikkz31
03-23-2017, 05:01 PM
Did you invest proper research into this? On my 1.8T for example the high pressure line can see over 1000psi at idle (not a typo), let alone when the serpentine belt makes the pump turn faster as RPMs increase. And the banjo bolt isn't just a banjo bolt (one on high side at least). One of the banjo bolts on my 1.8T has a built in check valve for it....

I did investigate a decent amount, and I decided to keep the banjo bolt system in place to keep the check valve. I don't know enough about how it works/how important it is so I opted to keep it. The shop is taking the fitting from the rack (where the banjo bolt goes) and brazing a new fitting onto the end of it, so I'll be keeping the original system in place, just adding a male end onto it in order to adapt it to a common fitting. The guy assured me the pressure would not be a problem with the hose he chose for me. Out the door, he quoted me ~$120. I couldn't find the right part for mine for anything less than $200 (except for the one I bought that failed on me after ~4 months).

Seerlah
03-23-2017, 05:09 PM
Sounds like you actually took a viable route. Pressure and check valve are the main concerns, which you covered. Then the compatible compound for line material, as mentioned above.

richardodn
03-24-2017, 10:54 AM
Those hydraulic shops know their stuff. 1000 psi? pshaw! That's nothing.