PDA

View Full Version : Turbo Oil Lines - Which Needs Replacement?



b5a4erik
11-05-2015, 11:26 AM
Hey all,

I was told a while ago, by the gentleman who sold me my used K03 turbo, to replace my oil lines for my turbo. I believe he recommended this simply out of prior knowledge of these failing (he never actually looked at my lines).

I've checked them out, and I think my return line is going bad.

My question is: Are either of the turbo oil lines, return & supply, known to fail?

redline380
11-05-2015, 11:42 AM
Replace supply line when turbo is replaced.

The drain only needs to be replaced if leaking. You can always clean it out.

The problem is deposits being left in the supply line which can starve the turbo of oil, leading to premature failure. The only thing the drain does is route the oil back into the pan.

b5a4erik
11-05-2015, 11:48 AM
Word.

Thanks, redline380.

walky_talky20
11-05-2015, 12:40 PM
I just replaced my K03 a few short weeks ago. I merely tested the flow of the line thusly:

- Right before I started the car, I left the oil line disconnected from the turbo and unplugged the fuel injectors.
- I put a spray paint can lid under the end of the oil line. Kind of wedged it there by the airbox somehow.
- Cranked the car for about 3 seconds.
- Saw that I nearly overflowed the lid in those few short seconds.
- Was thankful it didn't actually overflow and get oil all over my manifold and such.
- Determined flow was 'plenty good' and oil line didn't need replacing.
- Have been sleeping fine since this time.

b5a4erik
11-05-2015, 02:08 PM
Haha, cool.

This test was for the supply line then? I was thinking of just replacing the line due to recommendations, but I figure testing it first is a good idea.

I think my return line is leaking, so I'm going to replace that.

b5a4erik
11-16-2015, 04:26 PM
Hey guys, so I did the test:

First crank: a split second, not much oil in cap.
Second crank: maybe 3 seconds, a little bit more oil in cap.
Third crank: a good 3 seconds, much more oil in cap, almost filling it.

Think I need a new line, or just a Seafoam treatment?

walky_talky20
11-16-2015, 09:10 PM
The important thing is how quickly it fills - proving there is no obstruction in the line. The amount of cranks to get it going at first is not really important. That is just a function of how long the car has been sitting, what weight of oil, etc. Once the oil is flowing in the line, as long as it come gushing out real nice-like, I think you are fine.

b5a4erik
11-16-2015, 09:31 PM
Good to hear, I think I'll stick with it for now, seems to have good flow...

Thanks Talky!

nynoah
11-17-2015, 03:00 AM
Or if you have access to a solvent tank run solvent through it for a while and that will clean it out good. I would only do that with a pump action solvent tank.

b5a4erik
04-08-2016, 10:53 AM
Resurrection:

Hey all, so here's a pic of what's got me concerned about my oil lines:

http://i.imgur.com/pobCrkm.jpg?1

I've read that maybe I just need some new gaskets. based on the picture, what do you peeps think?

Thanks,

~ ea

redline380
04-08-2016, 11:06 AM
The isnt an oil line

b5a4erik
04-08-2016, 11:21 AM
The isnt an oil line

Please do elaborate Mr. Redline.

MetalMan
04-08-2016, 11:23 AM
That one is a coolant line.

b5a4erik
04-08-2016, 11:37 AM
That one is a coolant line.

Okay. Why do you think it's dripping oil?

redline380
04-08-2016, 11:42 AM
Well, oil is coming from somewhere above it. You will need to do some inspection

MetalMan
04-08-2016, 11:56 AM
Valve cover is a possibility. If the turbo oil feed line fitting on the turbo itself is leaking, it may lead to that as well.

b5a4erik
04-08-2016, 12:07 PM
Word Redline380, MetalMan,

Just replaced my valve cover gasket, thinks it's on there pretty well, but will inspect regardless.

As for the oil feed line, will consider the fitting on the turbo: Does this mean a new line, a new gasket, or just a tighter connection?

Thanks.

MetalMan
04-08-2016, 12:32 PM
As for the oil feed line, will consider the fitting on the turbo: Does this mean a new line, a new gasket, or just a tighter connection?

Thanks.

If it's the fitting on the turbo, it can be 2 things:
1) new copper crush washer between fitting and turbo
2) just need to tighten the oil line to the fitting

I suppose it could also be a leak on the oil feed line itself, where the hard line and flexible braided section meet (near the turbo).

b5a4erik
04-08-2016, 05:23 PM
Thanks for the info MetalMan. [cool]

Seerlah
04-08-2016, 10:15 PM
I just replaced my K03 a few short weeks ago. I merely tested the flow of the line thusly:

- Right before I started the car, I left the oil line disconnected from the turbo and unplugged the fuel injectors.
- I put a spray paint can lid under the end of the oil line. Kind of wedged it there by the airbox somehow.
- Cranked the car for about 3 seconds.
- Saw that I nearly overflowed the lid in those few short seconds.
- Was thankful it didn't actually overflow and get oil all over my manifold and such.
- Determined flow was 'plenty good' and oil line didn't need replacing.
- Have been sleeping fine since this time.

This. Just put a saucer or anything under the oil line feed. Unplug injectors electronically and turn the engine till oil comes out. You don't want to burn out the starter, so 5-7 seconds on, 10 seconds off. Do this till oil comes out you can judge the flow of oil by how quickly oil accumulates in your catcher.

But that is now what blows your turbo. Its is whatever restrictor fitting that is on the turbo. Orifices are very small, and deposits clog this. Lack of lubrication because of this orifice being clogged is what destroys turbos.

This is what I do, to preserve my $1,000+ power maker before it turns into a $1,000+ paperweight. But I have a bigger turbo. With the above mentioned for the oil feed line, I do with the whole turbo. Turbo off manifold, because the uncombust air can still spin the chra. Injectors unplugged and I turn the engine. I do this till oil comes out the drain flange on the turbo into my little saucer. This lets me know now only my orifice isn't clogged, but my bearings are lubricated. Now..I button everything back up and start the car knowing my turbo will be fed. This is also how I prime my turbo.

Oil drain is just a big cavity. That is not your concern. Your concern is your feed orifice being clogged, potentionally getting clogged, and turbo having proper lubrication.

b5a4erik
04-09-2016, 11:17 AM
Word. I did this test a while ago and passed. So basically in that case, the best thing for preventative maint. would be to get a new one of these: http://www.atpturbo.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=ATP-OIL-029&Category_Code=OIL ?

redline380
04-09-2016, 11:19 AM
Word. I did this test a while ago and passed. So basically in that case, the best thing for preventative maint. would be to get a new one of these: http://www.atpturbo.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=ATP-OIL-029&Category_Code=OIL ?

That will do nothing for you, and also not even work. It is just an adapter.

b5a4erik
04-09-2016, 11:40 AM
Correct adapter size (although it may not be what I'm looking for): https://www.ecstuning.com/Audi-B5_A4-FWD-1.8T/Engine/Turbocharger/Oil_Lines/Hardware/ES466851/


What would this "feed orifice" be then?

redline380
04-09-2016, 11:47 AM
What would this "feed orifice" be then?


That is simply an adpater so you can use your stock oil line on a GT framed turbo.

Ball bearing turbos require a certain restrictor so the oil pressure doesn't damage seals and bearings and because ball bearing turbos would have too much drag if no restritcor was used. Journal bearing turbos, like your stock one, usually do not require a restrictor because the bearing design is different.

What seerlah is saying is thought build up and deposits of carbon or other foreign matierial can block the small orifice in the case of a ball bearing turbo restrictor, or in both cases, the oil feed line that delivers pressurized oil to the rotating assembly.

https://www.turbobygarrett.com/turbobygarrett/oil_restrictor