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View Full Version : Tips and Tricks to save time/money



redline380
08-06-2015, 05:41 AM
Do we have a thread yet to save you time and money on maintenance? I dont think so, so let's start one.

Please, no money saving modifications in this thread. Let's keep this to maintenance, repairs, and stock-like upgrades. I would include links, but links go dead over time. If a link is needed, then just ask and it will be supplied.


So, my contributions:

Stainless pinch bolts. Tired of seized pinch bolts and dont want to take them out every 5,000 miles? Get some stainless m10x100 bolts. I can't find 1.25 thread pitch, but 1.5 will work just fine.

Ebay ABS sensors. These can be had for $12-$20 on ebay and actually work. Audi ones are what, $150?

ABS sensor cages. These are quite expensive from Audi for what they are. I found out that Volvo semi trucks use the same sized ABS sensor as us, and a new cage comes with a new sensor for them. So, head down to your local truck shop and ask the crew if they have some spares. You could get lucky and they just might give them to you for free.

Metal slave cylinder. This is unconfirmed, so I would appreciate if someone can confirm that DORMAN #CS650058 is indeed made of metal. It sure looks like it from the photos and Rock Auto has it for $51.

bikerbob951
08-06-2015, 09:44 AM
I like this thread idea!

For plugged drains throughout the car, go to the bike shop and pick up a shifter cable. Use the lug end of the shifter cable to push it through the drain openings, the same way you'd use a snake for a household drain. Costs just a few dollars, is gentler and less messy than using compressed air, and if you do it every month or so, you won't have to worry about ruined carpets and headliners.

melomandn
08-06-2015, 10:13 AM
Love this thread idea

This tool:
http://c1552172.r72.cf0.rackcdn.com/616297_x800.jpg

http://www.ecstuning.com/Volkswagen-Golf_V--2.0T/ES2702616/


Oh god this tool... I just recently found out about this and it has changed my life. Nothing frustrates me more then trying to pull off those hose clamps with channel locks, slipping and having the clamp spin to the other side of the hose where you cant reach it.

This tool is a game changer, if you're frequently working on VAG cars then this is a must.

Rodgman15
08-06-2015, 10:39 AM
Stainless pinch bolts FTW!

only thing I can think of is to have a wheel dowel to help putting wheels back on. Near impossible without it lol

Believer
08-06-2015, 10:48 AM
For the rear-lower control arms, insert the bolt from the rear of the sub-frame to avoid having to drop the sub-frame for future control arm replacements.

giantsfan7791
08-06-2015, 11:00 AM
Instead of paying ~ $12 for those vacuum check valves (p/n 058 905 291 K) that break from the heat, get 1/4" Kynar check valves from usplastic.com (item # 64174). You can buy eight for the same price as one OEM and have a few backups.

rockbeau25
08-06-2015, 11:27 AM
Notorious B5 ABS module? Don't want to spend $800 or whatever a new one is? Pm K0mpresd!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Mad Cow
08-06-2015, 11:30 AM
Stainless pinch bolts FTW!

only thing I can think of is to have a wheel dowel to help putting wheels back on. Near impossible without it lol
There should be a dowel in the trunk toolbox, it's plastic but plenty strong.

q20v
08-06-2015, 12:06 PM
Stainless pinch bolts. Tired of seized pinch bolts and dont want to take them out every 5,000 miles? Get some stainless m10x100 bolts. I can't find 1.25 thread pitch, but 1.5 will work just fine.


Guys,

Careful using SS fasteners on suspension connections. Not sure what grade Stainless bolts you bought, but a typical 18-8 Stainless fastener is significantly weaker than the grade 10.9 steel bolt in that location (I believe it is grade 10.9, but same story if it's 8.8). If you think it's ok because it holds when you tighten it, you haven't considered cyclic loading and a fatigue failure. If you think there is no additional stress on this fastener after it's installed this is wrong. I personally would not downgrade any suspension fastener from yield strength of over 900MPa to ~200MPa for the sake of a minor inconvenience.

Not looking to start an internet war, do your own research and make your own decision.

Stay safe,

Barry

Turbo_B5
08-06-2015, 12:10 PM
There should be a dowel in the trunk toolbox, it's plastic but plenty strong.


Stainless pinch bolts FTW!

only thing I can think of is to have a wheel dowel to help putting wheels back on. Near impossible without it lol

Make your own from a 14x1.5x100-130 bolt.

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/08/06/61bd191d510d87e823b68b59e609b584.jpg


Sent from my Jailbroken iPhone 6 using Tapatalk

redline380
08-06-2015, 12:17 PM
Guys,

Careful using SS fasteners on suspension connections. Not sure what grade Stainless bolts you bought, but a typical 18-8 Stainless fastener is significantly weaker than the grade 10.9 steel bolt in that location (I believe it is grade 10.9, but same story if it's 8.8). If you think it's ok because it holds when you tighten it, you haven't considered cyclic loading and a fatigue failure. If you think there is no additional stress on this fastener after it's installed this is wrong. I personally would not downgrade any suspension fastener from yield strength of over 900MPa to ~200MPa for the sake of a minor inconvenience.

Not looking to start an internet war, do your own research and make your own decision.

Stay safe,

Barry

Great theory. However, real world experience says otherwise. 30k+ miles on mine.

Keep in mind the bolt does not bare any load, it simply clamps.


Make your own from a 14x1.5x100-130 bolt.


This reminds me, I also made cylinder head alignment dowels out of old head bolts. Works great if you dont have an extra set of hands whilr installing a head

Turbo_B5
08-06-2015, 12:18 PM
what grade ss bolts did you use redline?

redline380
08-06-2015, 12:26 PM
what grade ss bolts did you use redline?

No idea.

However, I believe it is stainless grade a4-70.

This sheet shows a2 stainless (which is weaker than a4) to have similar characteristics somewhere between 8.8 and 10.8, ergo my life is not in danger.

https://www.tessco.com/yts/customerservice/techsupport/whitepapers/pdf/bolt_grade.pdf

MetalMan
08-06-2015, 12:41 PM
Stainless pinch bolts FTW!

only thing I can think of is to have a wheel dowel to help putting wheels back on. Near impossible without it lol

How about a wheel stud conversion [cool]

I find that having the right tools ALWAYS makes this car easier to work on. One particular tool has made things FAR less painstaking: wobble extensions. In fact I replaced most of my regular extensions in my car's toolkit with wobble extensions, and use them all the time.

pgiuliano98
08-06-2015, 01:54 PM
My dowel broke the second time I put my wheels back on....

Rodgman15
08-06-2015, 03:06 PM
Had my dowel forever, still kicking. Also got roughly 10-12k on my stainless pinch bolts, slide right out every time.

Seerlah
08-06-2015, 03:56 PM
1/4" cordless impact cuts down working time tremendously. And you are stronger than a 1/4" cordless impact, so dont worry about overtorquing things.

Turbo_B5
08-06-2015, 04:44 PM
No idea.

However, I believe it is stainless grade a4-70.

This sheet shows a2 stainless (which is weaker than a4) to have similar characteristics somewhere between 8.8 and 10.8, ergo my life is not in danger.

https://www.tessco.com/yts/customerservice/techsupport/whitepapers/pdf/bolt_grade.pdf

the bolts i got are only A2-70 but the torque spec is only 30ftlbs so it should work? or will i die :O

Spike00513
08-06-2015, 06:41 PM
-Figure out how to make AZ actually make sense, like allowing this to be posted/seen everywhere because it's an inter-platform matter
-Take advantage of sales, Mobil 1 0w40 Euro is on rebate again, ~$12-$14/5L jug
-Use OEM when needed, such as CPS. Unlike ABS sensors, it seems eBay CPS's are junk.
-Clean and anti-size on surfaces prone to galling, such as hub-to-wheel point.

pgiuliano98
08-06-2015, 07:02 PM
Where are you seeing that oil for $14 a jug? A Google search didn't return anything on sale.

giantsfan7791
08-06-2015, 07:09 PM
Where are you seeing that oil for $14 a jug? A Google search didn't return anything on sale.

http://slickdeals.net/f/8017715-5qt-mobil-1-full-synthetic-motor-oil-various-grades-13-15-after-12-rebate-free-store-pickup-homedepot-com

redline380
08-06-2015, 07:14 PM
the bolts i got are only A2-70 but the torque spec is only 30ftlbs so it should work? or will i die :O

You will be fine. I will give you my car if you snap a bolt.

Honestly, it is a pinch bolt. It pinches some stuff. If you are too worried, then don't do it. Like I said, that is a nifty theory. I'm sure we could have a team of scientists analyze the problem for a year before they arrive at a solid conclusion. Instead, I have ran the damn thing for two years. I'm still alive.

q20v
08-06-2015, 07:49 PM
Again, just a general message for those considering using an inferior material for a suspension fastener, I strongly advise you think twice, do some research, and ask someone for a professional opinion.
redline380 is incorrect and I advise anyone considering following his advice not to.

Hope the message gets across to the right people. Just trying to help.

Barry

Rodgman15
08-06-2015, 08:07 PM
I have a better message, redline will give you his car if it doesn't work. Man said so himself!


Also, I don't know if anyone has coolant flange issues like I do, I carry a spare plug and a few clips just in case.

FeebleBiscuit
08-06-2015, 08:15 PM
When I did my suspension refresh I put some Loctite all around the pinch bolt to try to create a barrier between the upright and the bolt. I'm not sure if it is working the way I think it is. But I've had those bolts out twice since. The first time was after this last winter. (I'm in Michigan) I didn't have any issues they came right out. Just another idea.

grifrowl
08-06-2015, 09:25 PM
the bolts i got are only A2-70 but the torque spec is only 30ftlbs so it should work? or will i die :O

Bolt strength should be adequate with a2-70 but you're leaving yourself a safety factor of ~1. Why are you guys removing suspension ever 5k mi?

Bordom
08-06-2015, 09:31 PM
So the pinch bolt don't seize in the winter.

I remove mine when I have to. No issues in Ontario

grifrowl
08-06-2015, 09:40 PM
So the pinch bolt don't seize in the winter.

I remove mine when I have to. No issues in Ontario

Ok, well to all who have done this, please replace your weaker than stock pinch bolt every time you remove it. 304 is great for post turbo exhaust, but a pretty poor material for making a bolt out of.

Turbo_B5
08-06-2015, 09:55 PM
Ok, well to all who have done this, please replace your weaker than stock pinch bolt every time you remove it. 304 is great for post turbo exhaust, but a pretty poor material for making a bolt out of.

lol they are like 5x more money then a stock bolt.

Bordom
08-06-2015, 09:57 PM
I've reused the stock bolt that was on the car for 18yrs. Not one pinch bolt ever needed heat to come out.

Other than a little bend, pinch bolt was fine

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

redline380
08-07-2015, 04:53 AM
redline380 doesn't have a clue and I cringe when I read messages like his.

Back your argument up with something besides "it's bad".

Seriously, there is no load on the bolt. It doesnt hold the car up, it is under practically zero stress. The only thing the bolt is responsible for is clamping. That is it. All of the load is on the strut and spring assembly.

You are over analyzing, over applying, and using a "sky is falling" argument. But like I said, back your argument up with something more than "it's bad" and we can talk.

Bordom
08-07-2015, 05:00 AM
Agreed. Unless you have real world experience or are have some sort of applicable credential (college/university) in suspension dynamics, you have no argument other than "the bolt is weaker," which proves nothing.

I never thought I'd use my university critical thinking class here lol

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seanf86
08-07-2015, 06:35 AM
The audi part number price comparison tool comes in pretty handy as I can't always think of which websites to compare pricing, it does it all for me.

Davdraco1
08-07-2015, 08:17 AM
Get those caliper screw in tool for the rear calipers. All my previous cars were just push in and I almost messed up the calipers the first time I did a brake job. You can always rent tools from advanced, you just pay the full price and then have 45 days to return it. I use them all the time.

Seerlah
08-07-2015, 08:30 AM
Advanced auto rental tools, which are better than autozone when it comes to qualiy. Use them to rent things such as oil pressure testers, caliper piston retraction, cylinder compression, etc.

FeebleBiscuit
08-07-2015, 08:57 AM
Get those caliper screw in tool for the rear calipers. All my previous cars were just push in and I almost messed up the calipers the first time I did a brake job. You can always rent tools from advanced, you just pay the full price and then have 45 days to return it. I use them all the time.

I love this tool. It beats that useless cube thing for 10 bucks.

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 09:03 AM
No idea.

However, I believe it is stainless grade a4-70.

This sheet shows a2 stainless (which is weaker than a4) to have similar characteristics somewhere between 8.8 and 10.8, ergo my life is not in danger.

https://www.tessco.com/yts/customerservice/techsupport/whitepapers/pdf/bolt_grade.pdf

That chart to some degree shows why we are conerned. A2 is weaker than 8.8 and stainless fasteners have a huuuuge variance in strength (unlike hardend steel fasteners) but yes you are probably good with 316l bolts.


Agreed. Unless you have real world experience or are have some sort of applicable credential (college/university) in suspension dynamics, you have no argument other than "the bolt is weaker," which proves nothing.

I never thought I'd use my university critical thinking class here lol

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

I have a bs in mechanical engineering and do fastener stress calculations pretty regularly at one of my jobs.


lol they are like 5x more money then a stock bolt.

Honestly this is the main reason I'm questioning it.

If you look at a stress strain curve for 304/316 stainless you will notice that the line falls away from the elastic region gradually at a pretty low stress value rather than a pretty hard yield region. Structurally they are not so great after entering the plastic region multiple times. The threads are typically where they stretch and/or break (especially when bent like in this configuration) coarse threads will make this tendency worse. That isn't to mention that stainless has pretty poor cyclic stress characteristics.

You can probably get a set of b6 spindles for less than a pair of bolts which fixes a number of problems including this one.

redline380
08-07-2015, 09:11 AM
I have a bs in mechanical engineering and do fastener stress calculations pretty regularly at one of my jobs.


Cool, so you can calculate the needed strength of a bolt to go in that spot without breaking. As I've pointed out, the bolt is hardly under any stress. I doubt your calculations would require much more than a wooden dowel.

But like Ive said, 2 years on mine and I'm still alive.

Johns
08-07-2015, 09:29 AM
http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20140423034814/roblox-apocalypse-rising/images/thumb/2/2a/Anchorman-well-that-escalated-quickly.jpg/500px-Anchorman-well-that-escalated-quickly.jpg

Someone had to do it..

redline380
08-07-2015, 09:31 AM
Yeah, I know. Maybe I'll have a mod clean it up after we get the bickering out of the way.

I really wanted to make this an informative thread to catalog money saving tips

Davdraco1
08-07-2015, 09:36 AM
This cube things are crappy aluminum that you can almost break with your hands. If the caliper is slightly stuck, the crude will bend.

Johns
08-07-2015, 09:48 AM
I really wanted to make this an informative thread to catalog money saving tips

It's going to be a useful thread.

I guess tenure doesn't mean anything to the guy

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 09:55 AM
Cool, so you can calculate the needed strength of a bolt to go in that spot without breaking. As I've pointed out, the bolt is hardly under any stress. I doubt your calculations would require much more than a wooden dowel.

But like Ive said, 2 years on mine and I'm still alive.

The bolt is under quite a bit of stress if you are torquing it to spec. Sure you can torque it below spec, but you're just shaving off bits of safety factor and at some point allowing your bolts and ball joints wiggle room. I'm almost certain this torque spec was established by looking at a preferred torque value for that fastener rather than being FEA derived.
All that said, just use the torque spec, but please replace your stainless bolts every time you remove them. Bending a stainless fastener more than once is just sketchy and might end similarly to a frozen stock bolt story or a 3rd gen 4runner story.

redline380
08-07-2015, 10:18 AM
All that said, just use the torque spec, but please replace your stainless bolts every time you remove them. Bending a stainless fastener more than once is just sketchy and might end similarly to a frozen stock bolt story or a 3rd gen 4runner story.

Thats the thing. The stock ones always bend. The stainless is straight as an arrow always.

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 10:31 AM
Thats the thing. The stock ones always bend. The stainless is straight as an arrow always.

That is because it is in bending while installed. Stainless is 'gooey' and probably becomes self straightened by removal due to its lower yield stress value.

Bordom
08-07-2015, 11:05 AM
That is because it is in bending while installed. Stainless is 'gooey' and probably becomes self straightened by removal due to its lower yield stress value.
That makes no sense because my old factory bolt was bent before and after installing it multiple times throughout 18 yrs. It was run like that for YEARS and there were no issues, even when one of the balljoints no longer wanted to remain seated in the knuckle. Replaced the arm and it clamped fine.

I would have been more worried about running that due to aging, 18 yrs of repeated torquing/thermal stress causing metal fatigue, weathering (salt/dirt/rust/water], removal, and not being straight.

I finally killed it by overtorquing to 80 ft/lb and it sheared clean off; more than twice the spec. Grade 10.9 in this location, for that many years, under all those conditions. The stainless is fine.

For those worried, go find higher rated stainless bolts to put your mind at ease.




Everything graciously mispelled by Android

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 11:17 AM
It was run like that for YEARS and there were no issues, even when one of the balljoints no longer wanted to remain seated in the knuckle. Replaced the arm and it clamped fine.

^This is the issue. Your torque value on a used fastener is garbage. Torquing the head to that value has absolutely no relation to the force applied by the bolt any more, cause the metal is stretched and rusty and worn. You underclamped your balljoint and it developed play. Also your 10.9 bolt holding up to multiple torquings beyond yield is exactly my point. You get weird performance from stainless brought beyond yield multiple times.

Bordom
08-07-2015, 11:28 AM
^This is the issue. Your torque value on a used fastener is garbage. Torquing the head to that value has absolutely no relation to the force applied by the bolt any more, cause the metal is stretched and rusty and worn. You underclamped your balljoint and it developed play. Also your 10.9 bolt holding up to multiple torquings beyond yield is exactly my point. You get weird performance from stainless brought beyond yield multiple times.

That was a factory bolt though. Well beyond its years of service.

I should have clarified that bolt was NOT stainless.

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

A4ski
08-07-2015, 11:30 AM
Great thread idea. If I could pick the one tool that has saved me the most time, money and frustration, I'd say it would be my 24" x 1/2" drive breaker bar with a swivel head that rotates well over 180 degrees. It has allowed me to break loose inward facing caliper bolts on several cars because you can still get the handle outside the wheel well. A piece of gas pipe on your socket wrench is no match for this. Also, zip ties: Useful for so many things, like suspending calipers from springs and holding my motorcycle chain together while I try to get the %$@#ing master link back in.

Wrath And Tears
08-07-2015, 11:33 AM
Not sure why you guys are arguing over a bolt. Its your car and your life do what you want and don't complain if something happens. I have removed at least 50 pinch bolts from almost every different model year from 95 on up for VW / Audi. Only a few times have I ever need to use heat on a pinch bolt stock or otherwise, even when the car is from the East Coast. So what my experience tells me is that I can use stock pinch bolts with out worrying. That being said a very big reason for this is where I live and the climate here.

Other people seem to encounter a lot of frozen pinch bolts because of where they live, type of salt used on roads and so on. So if you know your pinch bolts get frozen it would make sense to use SS and if yours don't get frozen then just keep using stock ones.

I was really enjoying this thread, until the rather pointless debate. I understand that you see someone using something you see as unsafe and want to educate or inform them, its a great thing to do. It really needs to be left at informing though no petty name calling or anything is needed.

As always with the internet, there are people who don't agree with you, also you need to take what you read with a grain of salt. Just because some one in a forum told me to go kill myself doesn't mean I'm going to do it. But if I do, do it, then the fault would not be with the person who told me to do it, but rather with myself who actually did it. What I'm trying to say is that if someone gets "bitten" by something they did because some one on the internet said too, that's their fault.


To try to add something to the thread..... um......... the best way to save money is to make friends with a mechanic and have them let you use their shop / lift, as well as ordering parts for you. This tip comes from a lonely mechanic [=(]

redline380
08-07-2015, 11:38 AM
Like I said, next time a mod is around, it would be nice for them to clean this up since the thread is a good idea, and the bickering isnt.

If we really want to move this debate, I'd be happy to do so in a dedicated thread.

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 11:42 AM
That was a factory bolt though. Well beyond its years of service.

I should have clarified that bolt was NOT stainless.

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

Let me be clear. The previous times you reused that bolt, the torque spec was near-useless, meaning while the nut might have been put on at 30ft-lb. The force the bolt is exerting is no longer equivalent to that of a new bolt torqued to 30ft-lb. Thus your upper ball joints were not sufficiently clamped. Thus they developed play.

USING STAINLESS FASTENERS IN THIS PARTICULAR SUSPENSION APLICATION IS FINE HOWEVER PLEASE REPLACE THEM UPON REMOVAL

Bordom
08-07-2015, 11:48 AM
Let me be clear. The previous times you reused that bolt, the torque spec was near-useless, meaning while the nut might have been put on at 30ft-lb. The force the bolt is exerting is no longer equivalent to that of a new bolt torqued to 30ft-lb. Thus your upper ball joints were not sufficiently clamped. Thus they developed play.

USING STAINLESS FASTENERS IN THIS PARTICULAR SUSPENSION APLICATION IS FINE HOWEVER PLEASE REPLACE THEM UPON REMOVAL
Why would it then clamp correctly with the new arm?

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

grifrowl
08-07-2015, 11:54 AM
Your new arm was not machined by your suspension spindle for x amount of miles and as such it fit better in the bore and required less tension to stay properly clamped.

I agree with all above posts about cleaning up this thread. I do believe that OP should include my bold, underlined statement in the OP.

coolgraymemo
08-07-2015, 12:14 PM
Forge 007/034 Motorsport Diverter Valve look-a-like for $25:

http://i.imgur.com/pqIY0nI.png

Wrath And Tears
08-07-2015, 12:25 PM
Memo would you run this over the 710n? Im looking to upgrade my DV.

coolgraymemo
08-07-2015, 12:33 PM
Memo would you run this over the 710n? Im looking to upgrade my DV.

I have the $25 DV sitting on my shelf. I'll replace my 710N with it next time I have my car up. I'll post my impressions then.

This one looks exactly the same as the $50-60 valve that FTG sells and very very similar to the one that 034 Motorsports sells for $90.


710N valves are supposed to be pretty good. I'm just replacing mine for peace of mind since I don't know how old it is.

Seerlah
08-07-2015, 01:23 PM
Use bosch cross reference numbers when buying sensor replacements. OEM sensors without the OEM prices.

Johns
08-07-2015, 02:05 PM
When removing front axles; break the axle bolt, pop the wheel off, undo 6 bolts on the inner joint, jack the hub up, axle should fall right out.

Seerlah
08-07-2015, 02:48 PM
Nice to know. I usually chock the wheel fully to the opposite side im working on. Also, tape up the inner joint when removed to avoid having it come apart. Keeps the grease inside too.

Lucas, you should edit your first post and add all ghe useful stuff. Avoids people from having to sift through this thread.

q20v
08-07-2015, 03:01 PM
I edited my second post for you redline :) I apologize for my tone, I got caught up in the moment!

grifrowl has been doing a good job explaining which is why I've stayed out of it, although I've had a hard time bitting my tongue.

The mods won't delete anything because this is a safety issue. Imagine someone taking redline's advice, running to Home Depot and buying some stainless fasteners not knowing anything about fastener grades, torquing to the factory spec, i.e. over-torqued for stainless, or reuses it a few times, bolt snaps on the highway and control arms pop out, car crash. Or he applies the logic to a different control arm fastener, one that is subjected to higher stresses. Nobody here, including me, knows the design intent of the Audi suspension. There are forces transmitted through this joint, and yes, the bolt is stressed while the car is being driven albeit lower than some of the other joints. Draw a free body diagram of the suspension assuming the car is taking a corner and it should be fairly obvious. Without knowing the design intent of the pinch bolt, using an inferior material is rolling the dice. Like I originally said, your call, I'm just pointing out the dangers. Better to be safe than sorry and just use the fastener that an Engineer spent a lot of time thinking about.

Seerlah
08-07-2015, 03:13 PM
Debatable but proven by people who drag with over 600whp and others like myself who drive their cars rather hard, if you ever have to drop the oil pan you can leave the bell housing to tranny bolts removed. Makes it much easier for reinstallation and for dropping the pan next time.

Davdraco1
08-07-2015, 05:31 PM
Just wondering. What trans to block bolts can be left out safely? I have to replace my trans and maybe the clutch again and I let the very most bottom bolt out bc we had to jack up the motor and trans away from the subframe and I wasn't soloing that again to get it back in.

Seerlah
08-07-2015, 05:40 PM
Exactly why i left mine out. All block to tranny bolts should be placed back in, which is four. One in each corner. Only oil pan to bell housing can be left out (all of them, if you choose). Also put back those two longer pan to block bolts that go in underside rear of the oil pan. And also place back the two rear oil pan bolts that slip by the flywheel and bolt into the rear main seal.

redline380
08-08-2015, 07:36 AM
Lucas, you should edit your first post and add all ghe useful stuff. Avoids people from having to sift through this thread.

Will do when I have some more time.

Keep the good comments coming.

Avant Nate
08-08-2015, 08:44 AM
Get those caliper screw in tool for the rear calipers. All my previous cars were just push in and I almost messed up the calipers the first time I did a brake job. You can always rent tools from advanced, you just pay the full price and then have 45 days to return it. I use them all the time.
I made my own using an old socket and a bench grinder.

Wrath And Tears
08-08-2015, 08:53 AM
The factory VW/Audi wind-back tool cost like $95 but is one of the only wind-back tools that can wind the piston back when its is all the way out. So if the pads were worn metal to metal and then some. On the topic of our rear calipers, the slots that are in the piston are supposed to sit horizontal across the pad. This was mentioned by an engineer at a class one of my fellow techs went to like 15 years ago. He has never seen any other documentation to support this, but the engineer said it makes the pads wear more evenly.

jaydee23
08-08-2015, 02:27 PM
When at Mcdonalds and putting a lid on your coffee ..align the sip hole opposite of the seam in the cup. Less likely to be a dripper. Life changing...

And tires
Take advantage of town fair tires offer to beat any price.

What I did today.
Find an online deal
In my case I priced tires from pep boys. They offered 10% 20% or 30% of depending onthetie. By purchasing online you get special deals. The catch with these deals is they require you to purchase extras like road hazard install stems etc....I called pep boys and got the itemized prices for these extras.
I priced my deal then subtracted the extras.
I called town fair...told them my "quoted" price from pep boys ......they did a quick online check...it seemed reasonable to them so I got that price and an additional 5% off. But included with the town fair deal I also got all the extras like stems..disposal..nod road hazard though...saved me an additional 100 bux

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

seanf86
08-08-2015, 02:38 PM
You can probably get a set of b6 spindles for less than a pair of bolts which fixes a number of problems including this one.

While being alum the B6 spindles and steel bolt corrode way worse than my B5s with steel spindles, steel spindles I can put an air hammer on the bolt and push it out, my 2 B6s and friends C5 with alum spindles required lots of MAP gas and cursing.

Being an Audi I find my pinch bolts come out fairly regularly as somethings always broken.

grifrowl
08-09-2015, 03:54 PM
While being alum the B6 spindles and steel bolt corrode way worse than my B5s with steel spindles, steel spindles I can put an air hammer on the bolt and push it out, my 2 B6s and friends C5 with alum spindles required lots of MAP gas and cursing

Let's debate pinch bolt solutions in another thread. Enough has been said here to convey the safety concerns.


Exactly why i left mine out. All block to tranny bolts should be placed back in, which is four. One in each corner. Only oil pan to bell housing can be left out (all of them, if you choose). Also put back those two longer pan to block bolts that go in underside rear of the oil pan. And also place back the two rear oil pan bolts that slip by the flywheel and bolt into the rear main seal.

There are 5 bolts that go from bell to block. All of them are fairly easy to reach with the car about a foot up in the service position.


The factory VW/Audi wind-back tool cost like $95 but is one of the only wind-back tools that can wind the piston back when its is all the way out. So if the pads were worn metal to metal and then some.

I've had good luck with one of the tools O'Reilly rents out. Not sure which one specifically.

adam044
08-15-2015, 03:39 PM
I'm in.

Seerlah
08-15-2015, 06:49 PM
There are 5 bolts that go from bell to block. All of them are fairly easy to reach with the car about a foot up in the service position.


Heres a tip. Nobody said you have to do this. Guess you sort of missed the reason for this thread. I could criticize posts all day, including yours, if i chose. But...I dont.

Those bolts are not accessible unless engine raised while in the service position, sub frame dropped, or even both. There are two that will require this. The others are easily reachable.

grifrowl
08-16-2015, 10:49 AM
Heres a tip. Nobody said you have to do this. Guess you sort of missed the reason for this thread. I could criticize posts all day, including yours, if i chose. But...I dont.

Those bolts are not accessible unless engine raised while in the service position, sub frame dropped, or even both. There are two that will require this. The others are easily reachable.

Na dude. I totally agree the oil pan bolts are unnecessary; they straight up don't exist on a lot of american cars. I'm saying that there are 5 not 4 bolts that go from bellhousing to block. All are fairly easy to reach without fancy positioning so should probably be retained.

Seerlah
08-16-2015, 11:23 AM
Sorry for my attitude in my last post, as it was purely due to miscommunication. Those bolts are a real pain, and wanted to let people know it won't hurt anything if you don't want to place those back in. But you must still place in all "block" to bell housing bolts, along with all of the oil pan bolts that keep it sealed and held to the block (you can get away with not placing all these back in also, but I suggest you do. I'm not the one to experiment with these to see which ones can be left out).

Seerlah
08-16-2015, 05:28 PM
When wanting to take off the tranny bracket, or other allen bolts in hard to reach places. Use an allen socket, with a ratchet wrench (or whatever it's called). Here is a demonstration with an 8mm allen socket.

http://s13.postimg.org/ylhekpc4n/tranny_swap_3.jpg

And when it comes to stubborn coolant hoses (speaking mostly on the plastic connections) not wanting to slide back on so easy, place some silicon spray (or whatever you want, like wd-40) on the mating surfaces and they will slide back on with ease.

Also when wanting to drain your coolant, drain from the lower coolant sensor. Much faster and easier.

bikerbob951
08-17-2015, 06:40 AM
Also when wanting to drain your coolant, drain from the lower coolant sensor. Much faster and easier.

Agree completely with this, the petcock on the radiator is a pain to use.

jaydee23
08-17-2015, 08:43 AM
When wanting to take off the tranny bracket, or other allen bolts in hard to reach places. Use an allen socket, with a ratchet wrench (or whatever it's called). Here is a demonstration with an 8mm allen socket.

http://s13.postimg.org/ylhekpc4n/tranny_swap_3.jpg

And when it comes to stubborn coolant hoses (speaking mostly on the plastic connections) not wanting to slide back on so easy, place some silicon spray (or whatever you want, like wd-40) on the mating surfaces and they will slide back on with ease.

Also when wanting to drain your coolant, drain from the lower coolant sensor. Much faster and easier.


Ahhhhh
Just did my snub motor mount from underneath. Wish I would have seen this last week. Great idea..

fR3ZNO
08-17-2015, 08:49 AM
This is more of a tip than a trick, but I thought I'd post this here since it's relevant!

I was looking for snow tires today and noticed that there are currently two $50 rebates being offered for the General Altimax Artic on TireRack. One rebate is through General, the other is through a TireRack promotion. One of them ends on September 11th.

I had to do a doubletake when I saw the "price after rebate". The second rebate just started today.

The Altimax Artic's may not be as awesome as Blizzaks or Nokian Hakkapeliittas, but you can't beat the price with the two rebates!

Seerlah
08-17-2015, 09:42 AM
When winter hits, discount tire direct on ebay usually has snow tires they unload for cheap. Two years back they had falken snow tires in 225/40/18 for under $400 shippped (set of four). Cant recall what brand they had last year. But they go quick, so you need to keep an eye out.

Mad Cow
08-17-2015, 10:39 AM
When winter hits, discount tire direct on ebay usually has snow tires they unload for cheap. Two years back they had falken snow tires in 225/40/18 for under $400 shippped (set of four). Cant recall what brand they had last year. But they go quick, so you need to keep an eye out.

Speaking of tires, this only applies to Canadians but there's probably US stores that do this too. If you used a Crappy Tire Mastercard at Crappy Tire you get 18 months interest free financing, I'm currently paying $30 a month for a set of General Altimax winters. Doesn't save you money directly, but it is a nice hedge against inflation and the USD-CAD exchange rate.

walky_talky20
08-17-2015, 10:49 AM
When draining your coolant (for example when doing a timing belt job or t-stat replacement), you often get some dirt in the coolant catch pan. This is basically unavoidable. You can let the pan sit for a while, all the dirt will settle to the bottom. Then transfer to another container using a funnel with a clean shop rag over the funnel. This will "filter" any bits of junk that got into your coolant, so you don't have to buy new stuff every time. Don't poor the last little bit from the pan, as that is all the settled debris. Poor that in your neighbor's driveway or something. (kidding. proper disposal)

redline380
08-17-2015, 10:54 AM
When draining your coolant (for example when doing a timing belt job or t-stat replacement), you often get some dirt in the coolant catch pan. This is basically unavoidable. You can let the pan sit for a while, all the dirt will settle to the bottom. Then transfer to another container using a funnel with a clean shop rag over the funnel. This will "filter" any bits of junk that got into your coolant, so you don't have to buy new stuff every time. Don't poor the last little bit from the pan, as that is all the settled debris. Poor that in your neighbor's driveway or something. (kidding. proper disposal)

If available, I just use a paint funnel like this and you can get every last drop :) Should be cheap/free at your local auto paint shop




http://image.ec21.com/image/karshall/OF0013289752_1/Sell_Paint_Funnel.jpg

fR3ZNO
08-17-2015, 11:39 AM
If available, I just use a paint funnel like this and you can get every last drop :) Should be cheap/free at your local auto paint shop

x2. Those work great for filtering coolant, etc. I have a few leftover from when I painted the bumper on the B5. I'll probably get a bunch more when I get some paint for my door blades.

Mad Cow
08-17-2015, 01:27 PM
When draining your coolant (for example when doing a timing belt job or t-stat replacement), you often get some dirt in the coolant catch pan. This is basically unavoidable. You can let the pan sit for a while, all the dirt will settle to the bottom. Then transfer to another container using a funnel with a clean shop rag over the funnel. This will "filter" any bits of junk that got into your coolant, so you don't have to buy new stuff every time. Don't poor the last little bit from the pan, as that is all the settled debris. Poor that in your neighbor's driveway or something. (kidding. proper disposal)

I use a coffee filter, takes for-friggin-ever but it catches everything.

grifrowl
08-17-2015, 04:48 PM
This is more of a tip than a trick, but I thought I'd post this here since it's relevant!

I was looking for snow tires today and noticed that there are currently two $50 rebates being offered for the General Altimax Artic on TireRack. One rebate is through General, the other is through a TireRack promotion. One of them ends on September 11th.

I had to do a doubletake when I saw the "price after rebate". The second rebate just started today.

The Altimax Artic's may not be as awesome as Blizzaks or Nokian Hakkapeliittas, but you can't beat the price with the two rebates!

I've used Altimax Arctics in 225/45-17 as winters for the last 2 years on my b5. Performance is killer and I feel like they last longer than blizzaks as well as being studable if you feel the need. For sure a good buy at their pricing,

Cheap, made in Germany by Continental, good performance. [up]

adam044
08-17-2015, 05:49 PM
I live in New England and I don't even use snow tires. Learn to drive fools.

Seerlah
08-17-2015, 06:04 PM
And this is why I know you have yet to enjoy Quattro.

Mad Cow
08-17-2015, 06:12 PM
I've used Altimax Arctics in 225/45-17 as winters for the last 2 years on my b5. Performance is killer and I feel like they last longer than blizzaks as well as being studable if you feel the need. For sure a good buy at their pricing,

Cheap, made in Germany by Continental, good performance. [up]
Yup they're pretty awesome, granted they were first time I drove on new winter tires. I was completely reckless with snow depth and never got stuck so far, even when going through wet snow up to the doors in a parking lot.

I got mine in 225/60(or was it 55?)/16, gives you a little more ride height, same size b6's use.

Seerlah
08-17-2015, 06:16 PM
^Is it a Canadian law, or just subject to certain provinces to have front snow tires in the winter at a bare minimum?

Turbo_B5
08-17-2015, 06:21 PM
Its law that you need winter tires or chains to travel on certain posted roads (Like mountain pass) at certain times (octoberish-marchish). this is in Alberta and BC.

adam044
08-17-2015, 06:26 PM
And this is why I know you have yet to enjoy Quattro.

Explain? We had the worst winter in history last year and my car handled great, lowered on springs and everything.

Even on my front wheel drive V6 Saab I didn't use snow tires. Those cars are good in the snow anyways too.

adam044
08-17-2015, 06:27 PM
Its law that you need winter tires or chains to travel on certain posted roads (Like mountain pass) at certain times (octoberish-marchish). this is in Alberta and BC.

How do they make you do this? Do you get like some winter inspection or something?

q20v
08-17-2015, 06:59 PM
Snows tires are mandatory in certain provinces, like Quebec for example. Winter tires are easy to spot and if a cop sees you without them, they can pull you over and ticket you. The other provinces, where it's not mandatory, the snow tires really make a big difference compared to summer tires and some all-seasons. But, with a good set of all-seasons and AWD, it's definitely doable.
Nothing better than a good set of winter tires, AWD, and fresh snow!

Bordom
08-17-2015, 06:59 PM
It's not law in Ontario (as far as i know) but i use snow tires regardless.

I can't wait to try it the relatively new nankang winters on my RS4 reps

Everything graciously mispelled by Android

LA4
08-17-2015, 07:08 PM
I've used Altimax Arctics in 225/45-17 as winters for the last 2 years on my b5. Performance is killer and I feel like they last longer than blizzaks as well as being studable if you feel the need. For sure a good buy at their pricing,

Cheap, made in Germany by Continental, good performance. [up]

Another [up] for the Altimax Arctics. Ran them last year and the performance for the money is top notch.

walky_talky20
08-17-2015, 07:29 PM
I run the Arctic's as well. 205/55/16 on swings. I find that they are kinda squishy. Maybe it's just my firm suspension causing all the give to happen in the tire, but on the highway it's a little too wiggly. I keep them at 38psi or better and it helps. My winter wheels tend to leak a tiny bit (typical for alloys with road salt) and as soon as the tires get down to 32 psi the car is a handful especially with any sort of crosswind. I haven't actually checked, by I think the load rating might actually be under spec for the weight of the car. Feels that way.

That said, they are a good tire. I have run them for 3 winters now and the tread is still like new. Excellent traction and pretty quiet, too. But if I had to buy again, I would probably go with a slightly sportier tire with a stiffer sidewall. Maybe a Blizzak or Graspic 3D or some such. Because racecar.

Seerlah
08-18-2015, 03:56 AM
Explain? We had the worst winter in history last year and my car handled great, lowered on springs and everything.

Even on my front wheel drive V6 Saab I didn't use snow tires. Those cars are good in the snow anyways too.

Having your car not being stuck and able to move is quite different than riding along with snow tires. Get a pair and you will understand.

fR3ZNO
08-18-2015, 05:18 AM
I live in New England and I don't even use snow tires.

http://rocketpopmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/leonardo-dicaprio-inception-squint-7110.png


I got mine in 225/60(or was it 55?)/16, gives you a little more ride height, same size b6's use.

B6 tire size for 16's is 215/55-16. Regardless, I've always used Blizzaks, but I thought I would try out the Artic's for the price.


I run the Arctic's as well. 205/55/16 on swings. I find that they are kinda squishy.
But if I had to buy again, I would probably go with a slightly sportier tire with a stiffer sidewall. Maybe a Blizzak or Graspic 3D or some such. Because racecar.

I was under the impression that any snow tire will tend to feel "squishy" due to the softer tread compound? Even the Blizzaks that I've ran the past few winters felt quite soft while driving (even with higher air pressure).

Avant Nate
08-18-2015, 06:20 AM
I live in New England and I don't even use snow tires. Learn to drive fools.

Seriously try some snow tires and see. AWD launches in the snow is my favorites.

walky_talky20
08-18-2015, 06:51 AM
I was under the impression that any snow tire will tend to feel "squishy" due to the softer tread compound? Even the Blizzaks that I've ran the past few winters felt quite soft while driving (even with higher air pressure).

Indeed. A soft sidewall is one of the ways to achieve better road holding in slippery conditions. But there is a limit to how squishy you can go for the given weight of a vehicle before it becomes a detriment to road holding. Perhaps with soft stock suspension, it would be ok. But with firm coilovers, it flexes the tires a lot and makes it hard to keep it in the lane sometimes.

More expensive tires use other methods to increase traction. High tech rubber compounds, walnut shells, etc.


Seriously try some snow tires and see. AWD launches in the snow is my favorites.

Mine too. Best part of winter is leaving people at the lights. And the snow drifting, of course.

Mad Cow
08-18-2015, 07:44 AM
Yea mine were squishy as hell with h&r race springs, any sharp movements and the whole car wobbles around for a bit. Crosswinds are terrifying though, driving through a heavy snowstorm on country roads at night was a seriously white knuckle experience. But they're cheap tires with tons of snow grip so you can't have it all for that price.

fR3ZNO
08-18-2015, 11:44 AM
Indeed. A soft sidewall is one of the ways to achieve better road holding in slippery conditions. But there is a limit to how squishy you can go for the given weight of a vehicle before it becomes a detriment to road holding. Perhaps with soft stock suspension, it would be ok. But with firm coilovers, it flexes the tires a lot and makes it hard to keep it in the lane sometimes.

More expensive tires use other methods to increase traction. High tech rubber compounds, walnut shells, etc.

I see. I looked up the load ratings for the Arctic and Blizzaks, TireRack only gave me the WS80 Blizzak as an option for my car, but it has an XL Load Rating of 1609 lbs compared to the Arctic Load Rating of 1433 lbs.

1433*4=5732 lbs which is still way higher than the curb weight of my B6 which is around 3500-3700lbs (add another 1000 for five occupants and luggage).

Anyways, I guess I'll see how the handling is, if anything it'll just be a tradeoff for the cheapness. [:D]



Mine too. Best part of winter is leaving people at the lights. And the snow drifting, of course.

x2000