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View Full Version : Brake Bleeding with Power Bleeder/ABS question..



Armenian
07-11-2014, 10:43 AM
Hey guys,
so I did rotors/pads and brake line change and now I need to flush out whole brake fluid , I purchased a Motive Power bleeder from ECS and I was wondering if anyone knows the exact and correct way of doing the brake bleeding/flush?
I am mostly concerned about the ABS and how it effects it.. and the sequence of bleeding im assuming its LR,RR,RF,LF but someone said its opposite for Audi? Do I really need the VAGCOM to turn on the ABS while doing this procedure or can i just leave everything as is and connect the pressure bleeder and bleed each wheel and be done?
(i don't have VAGCOM yet)

any help is appreciated

Thanks

Audibot
07-11-2014, 10:50 AM
You would need VCDS to actuate the ABS system. I did this a couple years ago for a guy at Waterfest, though it looked like more air was trapped than was expected.

I've heard mixed about bleeding order--I think my Bentley says to start with the closest and move to the furthest, but whichever--as long as you get all the air out of the system. I would follow the instructions on the bleeder and/or check out some vids on youtube. Pretty easy to do.

One thing I have personally noticed--I never got my brakes as solid and good as they would be via the two-person method. Close, but there was definitely a bit more give up top than I was expecting.

BaseDrifter
07-11-2014, 11:04 AM
On a B5 you should start at the furthest point from the reservoir and work forward. You do not need to bleed the ABS pump unless you let the master cylinder run dry, but yes, it requires VCDS to cycle the pump's bleeder.

fR3ZNO
07-11-2014, 11:04 AM
There is no need to worry about the ABS system and VAGCOM is not necessary. The bleeding procedure via VAGCOM is only necessary when a brand new ABS unit is installed. I too have the motive power bleeder and have used it on my B5 and others multiple times.

The general rule of thumb is to bleed calipers in order from farthest to closest to the master cylinder (RR, LR, RF, LF). However, some find that air is bled from the system better going the other direction for a B5 (myself included)

There are instructions on the bottle of the bleeder, but most important thing is to not over-pressurize the brake system.

I choose not to fill the bleeder bottle with fluid, to make cleaning up easier because I'm lazy.

Then, I fill the master cylinder reservoir as full as possible. Attach bleeder cap to reservoir. Pump handle until gauge reads about 10psi. Then proceed to loosen the caliper bleed screws as you would with another bleeding. Keep an eye on the fluid level to make sure you don't draw more air into the system. You may have to occasionally pump the handle a few more times in order to keep the pressure at ~10psi.

When you need to add more fluid to the master cylinder reservoir, and need to remove the cap, make sure you depressurize the system by removing the cap on THE BLEEDER FIRST. Otherwise, you'll make a mess and brake fluid is nasty stuff. Especially if it gets in your eyes (blindness).


On a B5 you should always start at the furthest point from the reservoir and work forward. You do not need to bleed the ABS pump unless you let the master cylinder run dry, but yes, it requires VCDS to cycle the pump's bleeder.

I disagree. I have replaced my master cylinder with a reman unit and only a bench bleed was necessary. No VCDS was used.

Armenian
07-11-2014, 11:26 AM
Thanks guys
I mean I haven't done anything to it yet I have it sitting with the same amount of fluid inside the reservoir minus amount was let out when brake lines were disconnected and the amount I had to take out when pushing the piston back that's about it, so the system was not let dry

So basically from my understanding, I will just fill the power bleeder and tighten it to reservoir then starting from furthest move to closest caliper to the master cylinder and just release valves and watch for bubble free and clean brake fluid to come then all valves being shut I remove the power bleeder from reservoir and top it off to full and close it then press pedal and lift brake handle till harden?

Thanks for all responses


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mysman
07-11-2014, 12:16 PM
Also, remove the old brake fluid from the reservoir and replace it with fresh before you start bleeding. That way you're not pushing all the old stuff through the system. You can use a turkey baster for that.

Armenian
07-11-2014, 01:17 PM
Got it thanks
I am doing exactly that, I was debating to use the blue fluid vs the yellow orange kind but I'm going to go with original one I guess
Also I heard something about disconnecting battery before starting the process?


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Mad Cow
07-11-2014, 02:50 PM
Super blue is known to be bad news for our cars, the dye destroys seals. I used Pentosin Super DOT4 when I did mine, apparently it's good stuff and potentially the same as what was used at the factory. It's also a nicer colour than the typical yellow brake fluid, it's a bit darker and more orange/brown-ish.

fR3ZNO
07-11-2014, 03:43 PM
Super blue is known to be bad news for our cars, the dye destroys seals. I used Pentosin Super DOT4 when I did mine, apparently it's good stuff and potentially the same as what was used at the factory. It's also a nicer colour than the typical yellow brake fluid, it's a bit darker and more orange/brown-ish.

x2 I also use the Pentosin Super DOT4. I was unaware that the super blue was bad for seals. I would imagine that since that they're both DOT4, it would be okay.

Armenian
07-12-2014, 01:25 AM
All done, seems like I have good pressure, haven't driven it yet because I noticed that passenger side bleeder valve had slight leak after good tightening. I plan to change front 2 bleeder valves before putting all together, can I simply move old one and put new one without getting any air in or I need to bleed the system again after I replace these bleeder valves?

Thanks


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fR3ZNO
07-14-2014, 04:37 AM
If you're quick, maybe. But you'll probably need to bleed it again to be safe. I don't think you'd get a lot of air into the system doing that anyway.

AudiTurbo
07-14-2014, 05:16 AM
I have completely drained my reservoir before and never had to bleed my abs? Is that bad? I even changed a abs sensor before without doing this process
Thanks