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View Full Version : Anyone know which engine has the Longest Block? 1.8t 2.7tt/2.8 (4.2,VR6, I5T, 1.9TDI)



ApeX-CrZn
04-09-2013, 10:59 AM
Hey guys I was just playing around with the idea of weight distribution in my head, and I started thinking about which engine places the most weight the furthest forward in an audi longitudinal application.
I've seen photos of different setups and would "guess" that in terms of length from furthest away from the firewall that the list would go something like this:
4.2 > 3.2VR6 > 2.2 I5T > but after that Im not as confident and would "guess" 2.7tt > 1.8t/1.9TDI

Dose anyone know or have the information on the exact length of these blocks? I'm curious if the v6's are actually shorter than the I4's, given they have one less cylinder in that direction.
I'm also assuming that the 1.8 block lengths haven't changed over the years?

This all is really just out of curiosity. But it could be pretty interesting to those thinking about handling, racing applications, or packaging for engine swaps.
I wasn't able to find anything really helpful on this topic, I was able to find engine displacement, so If this has already been discussed please ignore this.

walky_talky20
04-09-2013, 11:13 AM
Hmm. Interesting question.

As a side thingy, have you ever checked out the Ferrari FF? That is a very interesting AWD setup that was designed solely with weight distribution/center of gravity in mind. For reasons I'm not exactly sure of, I am always interested in various AWD setups, especially the packaging (ie: where did they put the front diff) and power distribution methods.

ApeX-CrZn
04-09-2013, 11:50 AM
I hadn't, thats a pretty cool solution. They ended up taking power off the front of the crank to power the front wheels, thus allowing them to shove the motor way back. Pretty cool!


http://youtu.be/jjf5wcNSTEM

jvega21
04-09-2013, 12:34 PM
I dont know if anyone takes that into consideration. But seeing as all Audis have the engine placed over or in front of the front wheels, dont know how much can be changed without custom mounts, cutting the false firewall and custom drive shafts and axles. In our cars I would be more concerned with weight, just because the location isnt something I would want to mess with all too much.

redline380
04-09-2013, 12:47 PM
I'm curious if the v6's are actually shorter than the I4's, given they have one less cylinder in that direction.
I'm also assuming that the 1.8 block lengths haven't changed over the years?

technially the v6's are only shorter by a half cylinder because the cylinders are staggered. when you add all the extra shit on, i would think the overall v6 is much longer, but in theory the block is half a cylinder shorter.

the 1.8t blocks only changed in 2001, and i think the length difference in negliable. the thing is, when choosing an engine for weight distribution, pretty much every engine in my guess would be worse. remember, the transmission doesnt move. so any longer engine (which realistically is anything besides a 4 cylinder) would place more weight closer to the front. good for front wheel traction, bad for everything else.

if you really want good weight distribution, the only thing i can think of would be gutting everylast ounce of weight possible out of the entire care and adding ballast weight in the back down low. i just dont see how an audi would make a good car for weight distribution. a large portion of weight is from the firewall forward.

Lornnn
04-09-2013, 09:31 PM
Yeah, the added trimmings on the V6 make it quite a bit longer than the L4. Does sit dead center as opposed to the L4, though.

walky_talky20
04-10-2013, 05:19 AM
a large portion of weight is from the firewall forward.

This is true. And actually more like from the FALSE firewall forward. Audi's smart placement of the battery and addition of this extra firewall brilliantly disguises how far forward the engine really is.

Their front end designs also play a big part in this visual cover-up, especially on the models with longer noses.

ApeX-CrZn
04-10-2013, 03:49 PM
dose anyone have dimensions to prove this? I agree but I want to find actual dimensions to back this :/

Corrado_Guy
04-10-2013, 05:01 PM
I know the original VR6 was designed to fit in place of a 4 cylinder so I would say these will both be the shortest of the group. I think the larger displacement VR6 motors are the same size as the early ones but I could be wrong here. All Audi's with an inline motor have it placed in front of the centre line of the front wheels which is why they handle dogs when they are FWD. The early V8 motors with timing belts would probably help push the weight back a little in the car as the newer V8 motors have timing chains in the rear of the motor which may push the weight a little further forward.