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View Full Version : Rear wheel bearing on 2001 A4 1.8TQ



DND
04-07-2013, 02:39 PM
If I understand correctly, the front wheel bearings on 2001's are 82mm, but are the rears still 75mm like older A4's?
Is it possible to remove them using a hub grabber or is a press the only way?
And finally, would an alignment be needed afterwards?

walky_talky20
04-07-2013, 07:22 PM
I just did a rear wheel bearing on my 2001 1.8TQM the other day.

- Yes the rears are the smaller size. Same rear wheel bearing as a 2000 quattro.
- Yes it is possible to remove them with a Hub Shark/Tamer/Grappler, however I'd recommend using a press:

My wheel bearing took immense amounts of pressure to remove from the housing. 20 ton press was giving everything it had and I still had to heat the housing for several minutes before it let go with a BANG. I feel that I would have blown up or stripped out a Harbor Freight hub tool without question, and I'm not certain a genuine Hub Shark could have done it either. I think the dealers use an on-car hydraulic tool to change them, which probably works fantastic.

Your bearing may not be stuck in there as bad as mine was, hard to say.

I will add this - I had lots of extra trouble regarding the lower control arm outer bushings. The camber adjustment bolt tends to get locked to the bushings, preventing removal of the upright. I used an air hammer, spray lube, and an impact to get the bolt free. Upon removal it was clear the bushings had failed (become un-bonded from their outer casing). This was caused by age, but the aggressive procedures necessary to free the upright definitely "finished them off". I anticipated having problems there, so I had replacement bushings on hand. The bushing is actually 2 pieces, pressed into the upright. I got mine from ECS for about $4 a piece. Used a torch to cut out the old bushing casing, but pressing the new ones in gave more problems. If you change these, I definitely recommend you freeze the new bushings and heat the upright a bit in order to press them in. The fit is really tight and I easily destroyed 1 bushing trying to press it in. Luckily I had extras.

I could have just left it be and thrown the rubber back into upright and installed it like nothing ever happened. But I wanted to do it right. I don't think any shop you take it to would ever got through the trouble of changing those bushings like I did. They would either not realize they became unbonded and spun, or they would realize it...but also know that those bushings are '3 days out' and will add cost and delay to the repair. This would inevitably lead to an unhappy customer, even though they are trying to "do it right".

Sorry. I kind of went off on a tangent with those bushings. But so did my repair schedule.

Duds
04-08-2013, 01:39 AM
Get genuine bearings, all *** bearings have failed on me in 6 months time. This may just be me though lol.

Edit, F A G is a not allowed apparently...

walky_talky20
04-08-2013, 05:32 AM
I got a bearing in a "Rein" box. The bearing itself was "SKF Italy". I'm pretty certain the Audi parts counter will give you an SKF bearing as well (but in an Audi box at double the price!). Anyway, that was the same part I used on the other side about 50k miles ago.

JAM3S121
04-08-2013, 01:08 PM
Get genuine bearings, all *** bearings have failed on me in 6 months time. This may just be me though lol.

Edit, F A G is a not allowed apparently...

hope my F A G bearing doesnt fail :(

DND
04-08-2013, 04:42 PM
How about LUK?
Anyone tried FLENNOR bearings? Supposedly has a 24 month warranty... http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinfo.php?pk=1525242

walky_talky20
04-08-2013, 06:50 PM
From the ECS photos, the LUK bearing appears to be a F.A.G bearing in a LUK box.
From FCP Euro's photos, the Flennor bearing appears to also be a F.A.G bearing in a Flennor box.

It's possible that the photos are not "actual", although ECS and FCP seem to be pretty good about using actual product photos. It is also possible that companies who are re-branding wheel bearings will change their suppliers (ie: this month is F.A.G bearings, next month they get a better deal from SKF, so that goes in the box). So you may not always get what is pictured anyway.

DND
04-08-2013, 07:25 PM
Next silly question, according to Rock Auto, that FLENNOR bearing is only for engine codes AVJ, AJL, AWT, and ARG; but it looks like the diameters are correct, any reason not to use it over one that costs twice as much from a different manufacturer?
ECS Tuning wants $12.39 just to ship one measly bearing and bolt so I'm looking to be cheap and save a few more dollars.

Duds
04-08-2013, 11:09 PM
Just to add to my post before I've gone through 3 F A G bearings on the same wheel in the first year and a half of ownership before I just bought a genuine one which wasn't much different in price and it's actually lasted 67k. Again it may just be my luck but i won't be buying F A G products again.

DND
04-09-2013, 10:02 AM
Just to add to my post before I've gone through 3 F A G bearings on the same wheel in the first year and a half of ownership before I just bought a genuine one which wasn't much different in price and it's actually lasted 67k. Again it may just be my luck but i won't be buying F A G products again.

I had an interesting conversation with ECS Tuning this morning, I called to ask if the LUK bearing had the standard one year warranty and they told me that LUK and F A G are equivalent to OEM and that F A G actually makes the OEM ones.
They also told me that if I install it myself, no warranty. :(

Corrado_Guy
04-12-2013, 03:01 PM
Using a press is not always necessary, I worked in automotive for 15 years and never saw a press used unless the knuckle was carried in by the customer. If you live in a rust belt then it may be needed but not living in a rust belt I wouldn't know about but I can say living beside the ocean it is not needed. Unless you have a lathe and can make dies a product such as this one (which I bought when it was on sale) has most of the things you will need with the exception of a tool used to remove the hub.... http://www.ecstuning.com/Audi-B5_A4-Quattro-1.8T/Search/Wheel_Bearing/ES1306825/

The first step is to remove the hub which makes life easy, I bought the round steel tube and cross-bar from my local metal shop from the scrap bin. I used the sleeve from the wheel bearing kit on the back of the hub and then tightened the bolt and out comes the hub...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_1.jpg

You can see the hub comes out with the inner race attached to it which will need to be removed later...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_2.jpg

Before you pull the bearing you will want to clean all rust and crap from around the outer lip where the arrow is so the bearing comes out smoothly. If this is packed with rust or crap or both then the bearing will be really hard to pull out so clean it up and take 220 grit sandpaper and clean this up before pulling the bearing.

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_3.jpg

Using the tools in the kit to pull the bearings...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_4.jpg

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_5.jpg

Using a bearing splitter to remove the inner race from the hub, I throw a piece of metal over the hub so the puller has something to push against....

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_6.jpg

Pushing the new bearing in...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_7.jpg

Pushing the hub back in making sure to support the inner race from behind or you will destroy the bearing...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_8.jpg

Done...

http://members.shaw.ca/vr6_corrado1/Audi_Rear_Wheel_Bearing_9.jpg

I put the rear brakes back together and then set the parking brake and torque the 14mm centre bolt going into the outer cv to 85 ft/lb and then throw the rear tires on and torque these to 85 ft/lb as well. Once these have been tightened lower the rear of the car back down until you have the rear wheels partially on the ground and then the inner bolt needs to be turned 180 degrees to stretch the 14mm bolt. Remember, the inner 14mm bolt is a stretch bolt and is replaced after each use, Once the inner bolt has been removed you can't put the car on its wheels or move it or you will destroy the bearing.

This took about 2 hours per side taking my time, frequent trips to the kegerator, and a few breaks with no issues of stuck bolts or similar issues. I only had to remove the rear brakes, the anti-sway bar end link, and then remove the single bolt on the top of knuckle to get the drive shaft out of the way. No pulling of knuckles, no driving knuckles around, no alignment, and minimal effort spent. I did all of this will simple hand tools and the bearings were pulled and removed using a couple of crescent wrenches so it was not a lot of effort.

walky_talky20
04-12-2013, 03:36 PM
^That upright still has paint on it! lol.

At 211k in the rust belt, mine was not having it.

Corrado_Guy
04-12-2013, 05:48 PM
^That upright still has paint on it! lol.

At 211k in the rust belt, mine was not having it.

That's one of the nice things about living in an area with mild winters. I live just North of the US/Canada border above Seattle Washington and before the White man came and destroyed this area it was basically a rain forest so the winters are usually not too bad. The Pacific ocean keeps the temps fairly moderate so we see a bit of freezing and a bit of snow but that's about it other than a lot of rain. Because of this rust is still present but it is not as bad as many other areas. I still see cars like Pinto's and first generation Civics which was all but gone in other areas of the continent.

My Corrado is a 1994 and it was 6 years old when I bought it and this pic was taken when the car was 8 years old and had about 130,000 kms....

http://media.corrado-club.ca/mods/images/vr6_subframe_removal/vr6_subframe_removal004.jpg

This is what that looked like after being wiped down with a rag and some brake cleaner....

http://media.corrado-club.ca/mods/images/vr6_subframe_removal/vr6_subframe_removal005.jpg

You can even see the factory stamping on one of the control arms in that pic. This is from my 1991 Jetta and I have no idea how many kms were on it at the time but this is how it looked after a quick wipe down...

http://members.shaw.ca/SyncroJetta/Jetta_Syncro_168.jpg

Pinch bolts are not much of an issue around here. When I changed my oil before I was going to do the control arms I checked both pinch bolts and both where easy to loosen and both bolts spun without lubrication.

walky_talky20
04-12-2013, 07:30 PM
My mind cannot comprehend those pictures. They don't even make sense to me.

Artiemas
04-12-2013, 07:49 PM
Suddenly, CT sucks so hard...

BlackLock_A4
08-29-2014, 09:22 AM
Can someone please confirm a few things for me - I'm having my bearings pressed in during lunch today.

1. Press bearing in upright with larger ID toward the outside of the car (being pressed from outside, to inside)
2. Press in hub to the new bearing (will be pressing into the larger ID)

Thanks!

redline380
08-29-2014, 09:57 AM
Can someone please confirm a few things for me - I'm having my bearings pressed in during lunch today.

1. Press bearing in upright with larger ID toward the outside of the car (being pressed from outside, to inside)
2. Press in hub to the new bearing (will be pressing into the larger ID)

Thanks!

its very easy if you just put two and two together. look at the tapering of the hub. Theres only one logical way it can go into the inner bearing race, and the bearing has to go in that way. But yes, you are correct. Just make sure the inner race is supported when pressing in the hub or it will come apart

BlackLock_A4
08-29-2014, 10:04 AM
It just seems backwards in my head - I don't have them with me right now, so I can't look at it. But it seems like the tapering is backwards - pressing the hub into the larger ID of the bearing doesn't seem quite right. But thank's for the response, i'll check it out later.

redline380
08-29-2014, 10:17 AM
the smaller inner race of the bearing gets pressed into the knuckle first.




http://i696.photobucket.com/albums/vv328/redline380/Bearing_zpsfdcb0aa8.png

BlackLock_A4
08-29-2014, 10:21 AM
That makes sense! I don't know why I had it backwards in my head. Thank you for the time you spent on that beautiful drawing!

-EB

BlackLock_A4
08-29-2014, 12:31 PM
Slipped right in - Thanks!

This video helped make sense of some of it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr5FSZZUGQQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fr5FSZZUGQQ)