PDA

View Full Version : Coolant Issue. Please tune in. Over heating. Help.



SeekB00st
12-04-2010, 07:22 PM
Today, I flushed the water out of the engine. Replaced with generic coolant.

Problems.

There we're a lot of air bubbles in which I believed I removed them all.


So heres is the dilemma.

The car will return the coolant heat to a normal level while being driven. However, when the car is at idle it will begin to over heat - quite obscure.

We lifted the front the the car so that the engine was tilted. I began to massage the large driver side coolant hose as the coolant cap was off. Yet again more bubbles aroused. Now I have it in a driveable state with the exception of long unexpected idling where the car will begin to over heat.

walky_talky20
12-04-2010, 07:25 PM
Are the fans kicking on? Good temp while driving + overheat during idling normally points to inoperative fan or fan switch as there is nothing to pull air through the rad.

If the fans are spinning, are they pulling hot or cold air off the rad?

SeekB00st
12-04-2010, 07:34 PM
Are the fans kicking on? Good temp while driving + overheat during idling normally points to inoperative fan or fan switch as there is nothing to pull air through the rad.

If the fans are spinning, are they pulling hot or cold air off the rad?

Well belt driven fan is deleted along with the AC. And the electronic fan is disconnected. Thing is, I never had any problems when running pure water.

Accord4tehloss!
12-04-2010, 11:52 PM
If you dont have any fans the car will overheat there is not any airflow over the radiator the dissipate heat

stack
12-05-2010, 12:15 AM
when it over heats
shift it to N
does it drop back down????

FNK
12-05-2010, 08:44 AM
When you move, air mass goes true your RAD creating a thermal exhange.
When you are not moving, with no fan to move air, your rad does a very poor job cooling your engine.

Why you didn't experience such heat issue with pure water, maybe because the system was free of air bubbles...

However;
As automobile technology develops, more aluminum or other lighter composite materials are being used instead of traditional heavy steel or brass. This resulted in significant mass reduction of engine and cooling systems. However, these new materials were more vulnerable to the corrosion damage. Unless appropriate anti-freeze/cooling water were used in this new system, many vehicles would get great damage on cylinder head, heater, water pump so that the drivers would experience various damage.

Mike@PureMS
12-05-2010, 09:13 AM
Are you running a mixture of coolant, or straight coolant?
Water has better thermal transfer properties than coolant, and actually cools the car better. Coolant, or anti-freeze really is there for lubrication of the metals, anti-corrosion, and to lower the freezing point of the water.

If you want maximum cooling you want to run more water. If you're in a really cold environment, you'll have to run more coolant.

SeekB00st
12-05-2010, 05:22 PM
Are you running a mixture of coolant, or straight coolant?
Water has better thermal transfer properties than coolant, and actually cools the car better. Coolant, or anti-freeze really is there for lubrication of the metals, anti-corrosion, and to lower the freezing point of the water.

If you want maximum cooling you want to run more water. If you're in a really cold environment, you'll have to run more coolant.

Thats helpful.


Why the hell is there no purge valve on these cars?
What is the best method to remove air bubbles?

Mike@PureMS
12-05-2010, 07:31 PM
Vacuum filling it works great to remove air.
A kit like this works wonders.
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPM222401820P?mv=rr

walky_talky20
12-05-2010, 08:12 PM
There is a bleed on the heater core line. Also, the Bentley refers to raising the coolant reservoir about 8 inches with the cap off while idling. Supposed to help work the air out.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b154/walky_talky20/heater-core-bleeder.jpg

SeekB00st
12-06-2010, 01:04 AM
There is a bleed on the heater core line. Also, the Bentley refers to raising the coolant reservoir about 8 inches with the cap off while idling. Supposed to help work the air out.

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b154/walky_talky20/heater-core-bleeder.jpg

Ah, I've never seen those hoses before.
I must be going crazy or thats a V6.
Gonna check it out tomorrow.

Well the coolant resivour is relocated behind the firewall.

danphines
12-06-2010, 02:46 AM
Ah, I've never seen those hoses before.
I must be going crazy or thats a V6.
Gonna check it out tomorrow.

Well the coolant resivour is relocated behind the firewall.

These hoses are on the 1.8T as well, they go to the heater core. It is a common spot for air bubbles to occur.

SeekB00st
12-06-2010, 06:58 PM
Well, the car is still over heating. It is over heating while still in motion now.
I ran the car and when it heated up to a normal level I allowed the purge valve to let air bubbles out until it seemed that the air bubbles were removed.

Apparently I was incorrect.
Unless there is another problem here that I am not seeing.

simon072889
12-07-2010, 07:55 AM
It could possible have somthing to do with your water pump they are pretty notorious in audi's

Dan[FN]6262
12-07-2010, 08:08 AM
I bet your headgasket is going bad, letting combustion gasses into the coolant system. ask me how I know

ThatA4T
12-07-2010, 09:09 AM
running with no fan and allowing it to continuosly overheat could have caused a head gasket failure as stated above, why not hook up the electric fan?

S4NIK8
12-07-2010, 09:11 AM
How much have you driven it and how hot on the gauge is it showing? My friends TT was regularly one notch above center for about 50 miles until all the bubbles worked out.

ThatA4T
12-07-2010, 09:17 AM
and what do u mean generic coolant?

SeekB00st
12-07-2010, 11:48 AM
How much have you driven it and how hot on the gauge is it showing? My friends TT was regularly one notch above center for about 50 miles until all the bubbles worked out.

Driven it maybe 35 miles.

The air bubbles worked their way out by themselves?

SeekB00st
12-07-2010, 11:49 AM
running with no fan and allowing it to continuosly overheat could have caused a head gasket failure as stated above, why not hook up the electric fan?

Better not be a head gasket failure.
Electric fan is hooked up now, it was unhooked due to a bad ground loop that has been fixed.

Avant Nate
12-07-2010, 12:28 PM
Coolant also increases the boil point. I don't think I have the bleed valve, I just pulled the house of part way to bleed the air out. The hose is located next to the battery under the back cover.

SeekB00st
12-07-2010, 12:29 PM
Coolant also increases the boil point. I don't think I have the bleed valve, I just pulled the house of part way to bleed the air out. The hose is located next to the battery under the back cover.

That's what I did.
It seems just to be burning the coolant.