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jkern30
01-05-2005, 06:23 AM
not a new member even though the count reflects it...wouldn't let me log on under my own name...

anyhow...i have 75k on the A4 and had one rear wheel bearing go south and replaced to the tune of $938. so in order to avoid another failure, (and the $$$) are the wheel bearings grease-able or repackable or are they sealed? i will be doing the work myself, so any hints would be good. been through the forums, and didn't find any good answer.


jkern30

Burntaudi
01-05-2005, 06:50 AM
They are sealed.
As far as replacing them yourself your still gonna pay someone some labor unless you have access to a hydralic press. Basically you need to pull the piece of the car out that has the bearing in it and take it somewhere to have the old bearing pressed out and the new one pressed in.
By the way where did you get that quote that seems a little high?

ModifiedA4
01-05-2005, 07:15 AM
Originally posted by jkern30
not a new member even though the count reflects it...wouldn't let me log on under my own name...

anyhow...i have 75k on the A4 and had one rear wheel bearing go south and replaced to the tune of $938. so in order to avoid another failure, (and the $$$) are the wheel bearings grease-able or repackable or are they sealed? i will be doing the work myself, so any hints would be good. been through the forums, and didn't find any good answer.


jkern30

$900? OUCH. waaay too expensive for one wheel bearing.

find a place that can pull the bearing while the suspension is on the car. it will be much cheaper.

Wholsea
01-05-2005, 08:47 AM
Wheel bearing is pretty easy to replace, if you can get a bearing puller and an on-the-car press (or know someone who has one)

Either that or take the whole housing out and take it someplace to have them press a new bearing for you.

cost of bearing: $60
Cost of having someone press it for you: $40
Cost of alignment: $60-$100

Total cost: $160-$200 max.

If you get a press and do it yourself, without taking the housing out of the car you won't need an alignment.

Process to remove:

loosen the collar bolt (17mm allen or 21mm socket -- I think) while the car is on the ground

Jack up car

Remove Wheel

Remove collar bolt

Here is where the process changes... If you are going to take the housing somewhere you don't have to remove the axle, instead, unbolt the housing upright (the giant arm deal that has the bearing and hub mounted to it...)

Remove the axle from the diff (6 12pt star bolts) Pull the axle out.

Use a hub removal tool (looks like a claw with a hammer on the end of it)

Use the on-the-car press to press the bearing out from behind (Like you are pulling the bearing out of the hub, not pressing it through the hub)

Install the new bearing in reverse.

Do not attempt if you do not have air tools, lots of force needed to remove the bearing...

Overall a pretty simple process, maybe 1-2 hours of labor MAX.

Without removing the axle, I was able to remove my rear bearing housing in like a half an hour, getting it back together was a bit challenging, but I think I spent maybe a total of 2 hours of tear down and rebuild.

The trick is finding a shop that will press the bearing for you...

I did my front one with an on-the-car press, much easier I think...

jkern30
01-05-2005, 09:08 AM
i thought that they probably were sealed. the $938 wasn't a quote, i paid that to a local Audi dealer for bearing, hub and ABS ring replacement that they claimed the bearing chewed up with it when it failed.

even all of this being said, it is really sad that Audi can't produce a wheel bearing to last a long time. a $9,000 Cavalier will get 150,00 miles out of a well maintained wheel bearing...why can't Audi?

ModifiedA4
01-05-2005, 09:52 AM
Originally posted by jkern30
i thought that they probably were sealed. the $938 wasn't a quote, i paid that to a local Audi dealer for bearing, hub and ABS ring replacement that they claimed the bearing chewed up with it when it failed.

even all of this being said, it is really sad that Audi can't produce a wheel bearing to last a long time. a $9,000 Cavalier will get 150,00 miles out of a well maintained wheel bearing...why can't Audi?

So this is your second wheel brearing you're on? when was your car last aligned? are you running after market wheels? there are things that can accelerate wheel bearing failure.

Wholsea
01-05-2005, 10:53 AM
If they had to replace the ABS sensor, I guess that could be an accurate quote, with labor included.

The ABS sensor is like $200-$300 for the part...

Not sure how all that could have messed up though, unless the bearing was so bad the CV knuckle was bouncing around in the housing.

The way it is set up, if I remember....

The ABS sensor gets plugged into the housing which points directly at a copper ring that is around the outer CV joint. Looks like a copper ring with small squares in it. The sensor watches for the holes to determine if the wheel is still spinning or not...

I think your bearing would have had to have been PRETTY screwed up to cause damage to that I think, though not impossible.

I knwo I need a new ABS sensor I think, as my ABS light is on flashing, and I have no ABS.

jkern30
01-05-2005, 01:17 PM
Actually none of the bearings are bad right now, the car is due for maintaince and since wheel bearing failure is directly related the lack of lubercation, i am interested in trying to pack the bearings so as not to have this problem in the future.

as far as the ABS ring is concerned, i thought that is how they worked...the dealer ship told me that the hub was out of round spec enough that the ring was damaged as well.

i usually do all of my own work, but since i had a extended warrenty on the car i let them do it, and the warrenty ended up only covering less than $100 in the end...and i was stuck with the 938!!

timdtracey
01-05-2005, 01:25 PM
Originally posted by Burntaudi
They are sealed.
As far as replacing them yourself your still gonna pay someone some labor unless you have access to a hydralic press. Basically you need to pull the piece of the car out that has the bearing in it and take it somewhere to have the old bearing pressed out and the new one pressed in.
By the way where did you get that quote that seems a little high?

On FWD models the rear bearing is serviceable just like on an old truck. Simply remove the castle nut from the rear axle and remove the disc. Then remove the bearing from the spindle. You pack the new one with syn grease and torque the castle nut to 25 lb-ft, back it off a turn and then re-torque to 25 in-lb. Just make sure you preload it correctly and it will run flawless for a long time. On this type of thrust bearing over-tightening will kill it within a few hundred miles.

Looks like you're quattro though, and it is a lot more work, so disregard above.

timdtracey
01-05-2005, 01:36 PM
Originally posted by jkern30
Actually none of the bearings are bad right now, the car is due for maintaince and since wheel bearing failure is directly related the lack of lubercation, i am interested in trying to pack the bearings so as not to have this problem in the future.

as far as the ABS ring is concerned, i thought that is how they worked...the dealer ship told me that the hub was out of round spec enough that the ring was damaged as well.

i usually do all of my own work, but since i had a extended warrenty on the car i let them do it, and the warrenty ended up only covering less than $100 in the end...and i was stuck with the 938!!

Sealed bearings can't be lubed. It is common with larger diameter, wider, and heavier than stock wheels to put excess stress on bearings. They create loads beyond the original bearing design spec. Even an exactly similar weighted wheel with a larger diameter can destroy a bearing because the rotational inertia is increased.(gyro affect; although much less common) Ask all those SUV drivers on chrome dubs how long their bearings last! With over 50lb wheels they chew up heavy duty truck bearings in no time!

ModifiedA4
01-05-2005, 01:38 PM
Originally posted by timdtracey
Sealed bearings can't be lubed. It is common with larger diameter, wider, and heavier than stock wheels to put excess stress on bearings. They create loads beyond the original bearing design spec. Even an exactly similar weighted wheel with a larger diameter can destroy a bearing because the rotational inertia is increased.(gyro affect; although much less common) Ask all those SUV drivers on chrome dubs how long their bearings last! With over 50lb wheels they chew up heavy duty truck bearings in no time!

also running a different wheel offset from stock will eat wheel bearings quicker...and as i stated before...a car out of alignment will too.