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View Full Version : I'm in FMIC-hell! pic request



JK35
09-27-2009, 08:54 AM
I would like to see pics of FMIC pipe routing. and by "FMIC" I mean big-uns[:D]

my intercooler is 31x12x3, and though I've got it installed and running, the piping on the inlet side is an extremely tight fit. I moved the AC drier/lines, and to simplify the equation I have a Tial-Garrett GT3076r which is full V-band. I have about as much flexibility as one could hope for, but I'm still not satisfied with the way this is going...

any pics would be appreciated, as I'm sure there are more ways to skin this cat than I have thought of[wrench]

BTW, anyone have any reasons for not mixing stainless and aluminum IC piping? I have no more aluminum bends to play with, but I have a couple stainless bends that are the same 2.5" size... Nothing comes to mind as far as inter-racially mixing the two, but I'm always open to advice!

I am most concerned about movement. I can make everything fit perfectly well with about 1/2" - 3/4" clearance between couplings/clamps/piping and other components, BUT, this is a fairly radical setup, and I expect some movement. Perhaps I need to build some solid mounts[confused]

mike-2ptzero
09-27-2009, 09:41 AM
You really dont want to use SS for IC piping because it will retain heat. Using them together might cause a hot spot.

http://www.centralvalleyspeed.com/photogallery/albums/userpics/10093/hood1.jpg

http://www.centralvalleyspeed.com/photogallery/albums/userpics/10093/raceseries.jpg


ER offers that top mount turbo setup IC pipe for the B5 in both AC and AC-Deleted versions for their B5 Comp and Race Series FMIC kit.

ghost6303
09-27-2009, 10:00 AM
i dont have any pics for you but i can say this...

BTW, anyone have any reasons for not mixing stainless and aluminum IC piping? I have no more aluminum bends to play with, but I have a couple stainless bends that are the same 2.5" size... Nothing comes to mind as far as inter-racially mixing the two, but I'm always open to advice!

stainless is much heavier and traps heat inside much more then aluminum pipe. other then that there is no harm in mixing the two. i wish you luck though, the more silicone connectors you use, and the higher the boost, the more they like to pop off. having a single pipe on each side of the intercooler welded up is infinitely better and less of a pain in the ass. if you cant get that, you atleast need a bead of weld on the ends of the pipes to grab onto.

JK35
09-28-2009, 08:39 AM
guys, thanks for the advice, and Mike, thanks for the pics!

I've just about got the piping finished (for now) and I managed to do so with all aluminum piping. [wrench]

I've got some very tight fits though...
the pipe joints fit. plain and simple, there are no gaps except where I use hump hoses and hump reducers. plan A will be to weld each side and utilize a single V-band assembly on both hot & cold sides (this plan also calls for solid motor mounts or some EXTREMELY "solid" poly mounts. (I have enough aluminum to make solids for "free" and will probably go this route)
I may form, or rather DEFORM the pipe in a few places so it's not so close to other components. any thoughts on slightly ovaling the IC pipe where it intersects the A/C lines and where it within 3/8" of touching the frame/front end structure (I'm about to do some plastic surgery with a hot knife and a dremel first though[>_<]


Plan "B" will require some more research and consideration... but I'm interested in using Carbon Fiber. -I'd fabricate the piping in it's entirety, aside from V-band flanges/bungs of course. anyone ever seen or heard of CF intercooler piping?

ghost6303
09-28-2009, 11:52 AM
flattening the pipe out a small amount shouldnt hurt, but remember the more you flatten a circle (or cylinder) the less area (or volume) it has. also completely solid motor mounts can screw with knock sensor readings. i dont know if you are using knock sensors with your EMS but its something to keep in mind.

and carbon fiber would trap even more heat inside the pipes then steel would. carbon fiber is a pretty good insulator.

Broncoman75
09-28-2009, 02:33 PM
and carbon fiber would trap even more heat inside the pipes then steel would. carbon fiber is a pretty good insulator.
plus even if you can get ahold of some it might be a pain trying to pull down vacuum pressure on funky bent tube shapes to get air bubbles out