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  1. #161
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    Oceanside, NY

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    I got the top half of a d3 intake mani for 60 so a complete one for 75 is great, I had found ones cheap but they were beat up and scratched. The top half I got was almost brand new so I didn't mind splitting the manifolds.

    great progress!
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  2. #162
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Awesome. Both flaps are free and pivot with ease. Wow, happy I found this at the right time! One thing I noticed is that the upper intake is not darker like I thought it would be. It's the same more silverish color of the upper that was on the ART engine. I thought the upper off of the A8 V8s were supposed to all be the darker more gunmetal color, at least that's what I thought I read Nollywood say somewhere.. Ah well, doesn't really matter to me I suppose. I'll just clean it up and install. I'm not going to fiddle with splitting it and having the top powder coated, although that would look pretty killer. I was also surprised at the weight of the thing. I was mistaken in that the whole thing was magnesium alloy. In fact, the bottom is aluminum, or a more aluminum based alloy. Just surprised me is all. Wonder why..
    Anyway, as I brought the intake out to the garage today to set it on the bench, I got to noticing the intake diameter. Looks a bit larger to the eye than the one off the ART motor does. I think I remember reading this was the case somewhere too. Kind of a stinker if it is the case: I'll now be looking for an intake air throttle to match. Maybe a mixed blessing I got the intake so cheap: now I can use that saved dough to purchase the IAT.

    Happy Thanksgiving all. (or, Pre-Black Friday feast??)
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  3. #163
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    Jan 25 2009
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    37870
    Location
    Oceanside, NY

    I think there is a year split that they change color. Also you got an A8? I got an mine form an A6. maybe that's the difference?

    And I do not blame you as far as not messign with the powder coating. Also everyone I went to once they heard it was magnesium, didn't want to touch it, also they told me I would need to remove all the runners and flaps. I tried to do it to a spare mani fold I had and I could not get them loose once I took the small screws out
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  4. #164
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Yea, got the intake from an 06 A8. Part number is 077 133 185 BL, Pierburg Part number 7.22927.10. (If that helps anyone)
    I didn't have any problems getting the place I took my valve covers to get powder coated. He said he's done magnesium alloy stuff before. Can't remember if he said he had to do anything differently/special with it. But from the looks of how difficult it would be to split the manifold and disassemble without breaking anything, I'll leave it well enough alone for sure, clean it up as best as possible. I mean, it's not a bad color, it's just such a rough finish that seems to be a magnet for grime and grease. Suppose it shouldn't be too big of a problem if I installed all my gaskets right!

    Took a dial caliper to the intake inlets today. A6 ART manifold measures 74mm while the manifold from the A8 measures 83mm. I guess I know where that money I saved on the manifold purchase is going..
    I'll do my due research, but any chance someone knows the part number for the matching (83mm) intake air throttle? I'm sure I'll have to find matching intake piping, since I'm sure both sides of this throttle are bigger..
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  5. #165
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    Splitting the mani in half is supper easy. Just 8 bolts at most. Getting the fuel injectors out took a steady hand. My guy said he would have powder coated it if I was able to take the runners out.

    What manifold are you starting with? S6 or a6? I know that is a huge difference. with how the inside splits

    Are you talking about the intake runners for each cylinder? yours came smaller than what you have? Mine was exactly the same. That's interesting.

    Also magnesium is a VERY porous material. Mine seemed line not matter how much I cleaned it it would get dirt a day or two later. I think someone mentioned that the oil vapers from the pcv system in the mani fold can seep into the metal and come through. Not sure how true that is but it kinda makes sense
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  6. #166
    Active Member Two Rings TwoToes's Avatar
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    Jan 19 2016
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    My Garage
    '95 Audi 90 VRT
    Location
    Maine

    Are you interested in selling your old (ART) intake manifold? I have a spare engine that someone sawzalled the flaps out of for parts on his car. I'd like to get another intake but as you know $300+ on eBay is nuts for me to spend on an intake for my spare engine.

  7. #167
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    if you are asking me, I don't have a complete mani, I only have my top half
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  8. #168
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
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    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoToes View Post
    Are you interested in selling your old (ART) intake manifold? I have a spare engine that someone sawzalled the flaps out of for parts on his car. I'd like to get another intake but as you know $300+ on eBay is nuts for me to spend on an intake for my spare engine.
    I'd surely be willing to part with my old one. Just gotta get over this congestion and cold so I can get back out there and start wrenching again, and remove the old manifold. Right now I have mine split too. I'd have to reassemble it. The flap ends are in ok shape where the lever bolts onto them, but it sounds like you're saying you have flaps and bushings that you can fit into the manifold? If you pay shipping, I'll just let you have it. No sweat off my back...
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  9. #169
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Quote Originally Posted by pee quu View Post
    Splitting the mani in half is supper easy. Just 8 bolts at most. Getting the fuel injectors out took a steady hand. My guy said he would have powder coated it if I was able to take the runners out.

    What manifold are you starting with? S6 or a6? I know that is a huge difference. with how the inside splits

    Are you talking about the intake runners for each cylinder? yours came smaller than what you have? Mine was exactly the same. That's interesting.

    Also magnesium is a VERY porous material. Mine seemed line not matter how much I cleaned it it would get dirt a day or two later. I think someone mentioned that the oil vapers from the pcv system in the mani fold can seep into the metal and come through. Not sure how true that is but it kinda makes sense
    No, I was referring to the inlet to the manifold as a whole, where the throttle bolts to. The throttle valve (orifice) is bigger on this A8 manifold than it is on the A6 manifold. Runner size really wouldn't matter, but because you mentioned that, it makes me wan't to be sure the port size and bolt location is the same between the manifolds, where they bolt to the heads. I'm sure they're the same, and I think I remember Nolly saying the V8s are all the same heads, right? Either way, when I get the old manifold out I'll check the new one's fitment before I say it's all a-go. -& before I can honor my offer, TwoToes!

    As for PCV vapors seeping through the magnesium intake, if that is the case, I hope I can lessen that happening by my deciding to install an inline catch-can. Vacuum will still be applied to the valve covers/valvetrain, but I'm hoping I can further eliminate (or lessen) the amount oil that gets inserted back into the intake manifold. When I split that old manifold I found quite a bit of oil sitting in the bottom.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  10. #170
    Active Member Two Rings TwoToes's Avatar
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    Jan 19 2016
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    My Garage
    '95 Audi 90 VRT
    Location
    Maine

    Quote Originally Posted by pee quu View Post
    if you are asking me, I don't have a complete mani, I only have my top half
    Sorry I was asking 4loops.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Loops View Post
    I'd surely be willing to part with my old one. Just gotta get over this congestion and cold so I can get back out there and start wrenching again, and remove the old manifold. Right now I have mine split too. I'd have to reassemble it. The flap ends are in ok shape where the lever bolts onto them, but it sounds like you're saying you have flaps and bushings that you can fit into the manifold? If you pay shipping, I'll just let you have it. No sweat off my back...
    I only have one good bushing and the hollow intake. The guy sawzalled the the flaps in half to get one bushing he needed out. So I need flaps and I thought you were one bushing away from a complete manifold. And there would be no need to reassemble as I would go through it all anyway. As long as all the bolts are there.
    I guess it's been so long that I can't remember just what parts you're missing.

  11. #171
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
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    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Yea, finding time to push forward with it has been rough. I've machined the one bushing, but it is very prototyp-ish. I had to file a bit out of a hole here or there to get it to fit. I also didn't machine the groove on the outside for the seal to sit between the bushing and the manifold. That and I need to find another shaft seal to go over the flap shaft & inside the bushing. So I've gotten pretty far with the bushing, but it'd still need some work to get it acceptable for use. So basically my old intake consists of a top and bottom half, and two flaps. I don't think I remember taking any bolts out to separate the top and bottom, just the bolts that hold the manifold down, and I'll need those to attach this new manifold. Not sure if that's really useful to you if you're trying to assemble a complete manifold. It was getting so tough to get all the parts I needed for the intake that I decided to just find another manifold.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  12. #172
    Active Member Two Rings TwoToes's Avatar
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    Jan 19 2016
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    My Garage
    '95 Audi 90 VRT
    Location
    Maine

    That's definitely worth paying shipping for when you get it removed. I have the bolts to put it back together, so no bolts with it are fine.

  13. #173
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
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    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
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    South Central Indiana

    If I find hardware that keeps the two halves together, I'll reassemble. I'll let you know when I get it swapped out.

    Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  14. #174
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    Oceanside, NY

    just go to a hardwear store and pick up some stainless hex head bolts.
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  15. #175
    Active Member Two Rings TwoToes's Avatar
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    '95 Audi 90 VRT
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    Maine

    Awesome. Thanks

  16. #176
    Veteran Member Three Rings audinutt's Avatar
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    Jan 11 2007
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    14809
    My Garage
    2001 A8l 2001 A4TQM Avant
    Location
    texas

    I have a spare manifold if anyone is looking not trying to get rich off it either.

    Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
    98.5 A4 1.8T

  17. #177
    Established Member Two Rings haliceaa4's Avatar
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    May 22 2012
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    Lockport, NY US

    Quote Originally Posted by audinutt View Post
    I have a spare manifold if anyone is looking not trying to get rich off it either.

    Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
    Pics?

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

  18. #178
    Active Member Two Rings TwoToes's Avatar
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    Jan 19 2016
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    '95 Audi 90 VRT
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    Maine

    Quote Originally Posted by audinutt View Post
    I have a spare manifold if anyone is looking not trying to get rich off it either.
    It's all there and no broken parts?! 👍
    How much$?

  19. #179
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
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    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Mapping and Changes Complete!

    I've finished mapping my wiring for the ECU plenum chamber connectors. This took quite a while as I wanted to make absolutely sure I had things correct and verified on the actual vehicle and engine.
    The next several posts cover the changes required and connections made through the ECU Plenum Chamber connectors, for mating the 4.2 ART engine to my 1999.5 A4. I have found that the Bentley manuals were quite helpful to determine routing, but there are several conflicts and errors on Bentley's part. I'm sure this is much to do with rolling changes throughout the year. So if you are following my wiring and mapping -I do hope this helps you! -But I quite highly recommend you acquire a Bentley manual for your engine and vehicle, as what I have mapped may be specific to my car, and may not be representative of all 1999.5 A4's with the AHA 2.8 or al 2000 A6's with the ART 4.2.

    Without further adieu, here are my wiring changes:
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  20. #180
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Feb 21 2013
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    109977
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    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: White Connector: Part 1

    I have decided to make wiring changes to accomodate the original ART engine's ECM pinout. If I decide to continue to replace the ECM with the ME7.1.1 ECM in order to use the Euro S6 manual file, I will make appropriate changes then. I'm deciding to take the scientific approach here: change one thing at a time (if possible) and test results before making other changes. This will make things easier to troubleshoot. I know that the current ECM and calibration expects an automatic transmission and thus want's to fuel more at idle to account for the load of the torque converter, but I am wondering if I can simply automate the A/C compressor to turn on when the engine is under 600rpm or so. I'm not sure how the shifting will be though, if I will have an annoying amount of rev-hang or some other strange occurrance. But as I mentioned, it is better to change as few things as possible at once and go from there. So I'll solve that battle when I come to it.
    So here are my wiring changes:

    To begin mating my newly installed 4.2 ART engine with the 1999.5 B5, I decided to start with the white 15pin and white 3pin connector in the ECU plenum chamber.
    The white connector handles these components:
    • Drive by wire accelerator
    • Cruise control
    • Brake switch
    • Clutch switch
    • Power to SAI Pump Motor



    I have documented my changes and mapping along the way in a google spreadsheet, separating each connector by tabs.
    Here is a link to my published Plenum Chamber Connectors mapping document:
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    For the white connector, I have mapped each signal as shown in this spreadsheet. I'll explain my findings and what wiring changes are required below:
    15PinWhite

    The white T15e connector must be taken from the A6. When the connector is removed from the A6, keep the wiring that goes the the accelerator pedal harness. Keep the accelerator pedal harness and the accelerator. All this is needed. Make sure to leave as much wire connected to the White connector as possible. You don't want to cut yourself short (literally). The White connector can then be inserted into the A4's plenum chamber connector holster, through the bottom. Doing this is tight and cramped, but can be done without the need for moving relay banks.
    DSC_0754
    DSC_0756
    As shown below, be sure to add the red/green wire to populate pin 13. This is for the clutch switch, which the A6 was not originally equipped with. I harvested this red/green wire (and pin) from another ECU plenum connector from the A6. Make sure to leave yourself enough wire to work with.
    DSC_0751
    DSC_0753
    DSC_0758

    Tight fit, but it is just barely accessible:
    DSC_0763

    Pins 1 through 6 are the drive by wire accelerator pedal signals. There is no change needed to be made to the accelerator pedal signal pinout since the pedal is taken directly from the A6. This wiring can be found in the C5 manual, page 5-7_EWD129:
    5-7_EWD129

    Pins 7 through 10 are cruise control signals. The ART V8 engine manages cruise control via the ECM. The A4's 2.8 engine manages cruise control via a separate cruise control module (located behind the glovebox) and the cruise control vacuum pump.
    My educated guess: a separate vacuum pump was used for cruise control for stability. The vacuum from the engine varies too much, which would cause vehicle speed to dodge around while in cruise mode; it would always be oscillating around the set speed. But, since the standalone cruise control module is no longer needed, it can be removed. The wiring to the module can certainly be left in place; just leave the connector disconnected. I zip tied the connector to the dash so it wouldn't bounce and vibrate around. No one likes those pesky creaks and rattles. I also left the vacuum pump in place as it sits under the ABS module and I didn't want to go through the hassle just to remove the pump.
    Here is where you can find the cruise control module in the B5, behind the glovebox:
    DSC_0695
    DSC_0698
    DSC_0697
    DSC_0701
    DSC_0702

    There's a bolt holding the Cruise Control module under the dash, as can be seen in the above photos. Can't remember size.
    Removing the glovebox was not hard. If I remember correctly, there are two tabs on each side that must be pulled so it can articulate all the way down, then the hinge can be separated. Forgot to take pictures of this, but it was pretty straightforward.

    Unfortunately some wiring changes are needed to get the cruise control signals sorted out. Now, this is where we could split hairs over what cruise control wiring is actually needed, because there is a variation of which instrument clusters and turn-signal/cruise control stocks/levers are used.
    Here is a great thread that details all the differences between each instrument cluster. It's worth the readthrough while making these wiring changes.
    http://www.audizine.com/forum/showth...ibility-issues

    It still does not show my exact cluster though. Mine is still slightly different, and I will have to pay attention to this difference when mapping signals that go to/from the cluster:
    DSC_0705
    DSC_2418
    DSC_2419
    DSC_2420
    The part number on this cluster is 8D0919911X.
    It is easier to make Cruise Control wiring changes (and future changes for wiring that goes to the instrument cluster) if the cluster is removed. A lot of access is gained with this removed.
    DSC_0711

    I am going to point out the changes needed for a 1999.5 B5, without the LCD display in the instrument cluster. Instrument clusters that have the LCD display use a different stalk that has extra buttons that allow you to have more control of what information is displayed. Although the LCD display instrument cluster does sound attractive, I'll submit this as a candidate project for the future. I want to avoid as much scope-creep as possible.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  21. #181
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: White Connector: Part 2

    So, getting on with it: Wiring the cruise control buttons in the stalk to the ECM isn't as simple as following the ART 4.2 section 5 from the A6 Bentley manual. The ECM side can be found in this section, but the signal pinout for the stalk from the B5 must be found in the B5 Bentley Manual, in the 1999 model year section (section 56), since the stalk from the 1999 B5 is being used. This requires some analysis of the cruise control stalk diagrams from each manual, and between the MY1999 and MY2000 sections within the B5 manual. The MY2000 section (section 78) has the same cruise control component as the A6. So by comparing these three sections, proper pin mapping can be attained.

    Here's an analysis of the cruise control stalk from the three sections:
    From the A6 C5 manual, Section 5 (MY2001 section for 4.2 ART engine, section also applies mostly to the MY2000 also) page 5-10_EWD130:
    5-10_EWD130

    From the A4 B5 manual, Section 10 (MY1996 section, but wiring for MY1999.5 is the same) page 10-1_Y106 :
    10-1_Y106

    From the A4 B5 manual, Section 78 (MY2000 2.8L ATQ, matches CC stalk of MY2000 A6) page 78-5_Y484:
    78-5_Y484

    If you look at the E45 cruise control switch from the A4's 10-1_Y106 (MY1996-1999) and 78-5_Y484 (MY2000), you'll see that the switch is the same. Wiring to the switch differs, but the switch and pinout is the same.
    If you look closely at the E45 cruise control switch from the A4's 78-5_Y484 (MY2000) and the A6's 5-10_EWD130, you'll see that the wiring to the switch is the same, as well as the physical circuit. The pinout differs, but the switch circuitry and wiring to the switch is the same (to/from the T15 white connector).

    So the wiring to the cruise control switch in the 1999 can be adapted to match that of the later model (MY2000) wiring.

    It's best now to reason through and write out what pins are what, on the A4's cruise control E45 switch from 10-1_Y106. They're not explicitly written, but they can be figured out:
    The cruise control stalk has 2 switches: a Resume(Accel)/On/Cancel/Off slider switch on the side, and a Set(Decel) button switch on the end.
    (Show picture of cruise control stalk here)

    You can see from the schematic of the switch that there are 4 positions (contacts). They are, in order from right (closer to the steering wheel) to left (further from the steering wheel), Resume(accel), On, Cancel, and Off.
    Pin 5 is where the cruise control switch gets its power. It can therefore be considered the cruise control power switch. The left 3 of 4 positions (contacts) for this pin allows power to flow through the switch. The right most position (Off), does not let power into the switch. When the switch is in the left 3 positions (not Off = enabled), pin 4 will have power. Therefore, pin 4 can be considered the cruise control enabled signal.
    The button switch routes the power signal (when the slider switch is not in the Off position) from pin 5, to pin 3. Pin 3 is therefore the Set(decel) signal.
    Pin 2 only has the left most contact populated. That means that the switch must be in the far left position -Resume(accel) position, in order to route power from pin 5 to pin 2. Pin 2 is therefore the Resume(accel) signal.
    Pin 6 is connected to a power source. In the earlier model A4 wiring, this comes through the normally closed brake switch. In the newer wiring, CC is managed inside the ECM, and the ECM knows when the brake switch is applied so the CC will be turned off when it sees the brake applied.
    Pin 1 has only the left 2 of 4 contacts populated, meaning that power is routed from pin 6 to pin 1 when the slider switch is in the left two positions: Resume(accel) = far left, position 1, and On = second from left, position 2. Alternatively, the pin does not get power when the switch is in positions 3 and 4 (Cancel and Off) positions. Therefore, pin 1 is the Cruise Cancel/Off signal.

    So now we have:
    Pin 1: CC ON/Cancel Signal
    Pin 2: CC Resume Signal
    Pin 3: CC Set/Decelerate Signal
    Pin 4: CC Enabled Signal
    Pin 5: CC Power Source
    Pin 6: CC Enabled Signal (Brake)

    Since, as said before, the CC Switch diagram and pinout is the same in the MY1996-MY1999 A4 and the MY2000 A4, and the wiring to the switch is the same between the MY2000 A4 and the A6, the switch can now be rewired to match the diagram shown in the MY2000 A4 on 78-5_Y484. The White T15 connector pinout can be followed to accomplish this. Here are the changes, one by one, for the Cruise Control signals: (Study the pinout map closely before any changes are made)
    • T15e-7 (CC ON/Cancel Signal to ECU) Red/Grey. Going to pin 2 of Clutch Vacuum Vent Valve Switch. Remove, and run to T15/7 Red/Grey.
    • T15e-8 (CC Resume Signal to ECU) Blue. Going to pin 10 of CC module. Remove, and run to T15/8 Blue.
    • T15e-9 (CC Set/Decel Signal to ECU) Red/Yellow. Going to pin 4 of CC module. Remove, and run to T15/9 Red/Yellow.
    • T15e-10 (CC Sw Enabled Signal to ECU) Back/Yellow. Going to CC module pin 8. Remove, and bridge with T6Y-6 Red/Black and then run to T15/10 Black/White.
    • T15e-10 (CC ON/Cancel Supply to switch) Red/Black. Goes to junction which is switched power when Brake Switch is applied. (A18). Clip this wire from the junction and bridge it with T6Y-4 Black/Yellow and then run to T15/10 Black/White.


    Finished Cruise Control wiring:
    DSC_0769
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  22. #182
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: White Connector: Part 3

    Brake switch and Clutch Switch

    Wiring the brake and clutch switches requires quite a bit of reconfiguration. The clutch switch from the A4 must be added, and the brake switch from the A6 must be fitted to the car. The brake switch from the A4 was a 2-pin switch with a vacuum vent valve, whereas the brake switch from the A6 (which is needed for the V8 engine) is a 4-pin switch.

    Fortunately, the diagrams are pretty straightforward:
    A4 configuration 10-1_Y106:
    10-1_Y106

    A6 configuration 5-9_EWD130:
    5-9_EWD130

    For the brake switch (F):
    The Red/Black (brake applied signal) wire going to pin 2 on the 2-pin brake switch from the B5 (F) should now be wired to pin 2 of the 4-pin brake switch from the C5 (F/F47 switch). The brake applied signal is no longer needed to go to T6Y/6 at the cruise control stalk. The Red/Black wire from the White T15 connector pin 11 should now be connected to this signal. The cruise control stalk (and thus cruise control module) no longer needs this signal, as cruise control is now handled by the ECM.
    The Red/Yellow wire (power supply for brake switch) wire going to pin 1 on the 2-pin brake switch from the B5 (F) should now be wired to pin 1 of the 4-pin brake switch from the C5 (F/F47 switch).

    For the brake vacuum vent (CC) switch (F47):
    Power needs to go to pin 3 of the brake switch. This power is taken from the same spot that the clutch switch pin 2 is.. Fuse S7 10A.
    Pin 4 (white/red) of the Vacuum Vent Valve Switch from the C5 will still be wired to T15e/12 once the switch is installed.

    For the clutch switch (F36):
    The clutch switch signal is not populated in the White T15 plenum connector in the A6 because the initial setup was an automatic transmission. Pin 13 of the white connector must be populated on car side to clutch switch and on engine side to ECM pin 39. Connect the T15/13 wire previously installed to pin 1 of the clutch switch. Pin 2 of the clutch switch is power input. Power should be taken from Fuse S7 10A. This power signal also goes to pin 3 of the brake switch, as mentioned above.
    Note that the clutch switch from the A4 is a Normally Open switch. Once the ECM calibration is setup to manual transmission configuration, the A6 will expect a Normally Closed switch. Use the A4's brake switch (F) that was previously removed. It is a normally closed switch. The connector must also be used.

    Here is the best picture I could take of the installed switches. It was hard to get the camera to focus as there was a lot close and far to focus on.
    DSC_2451

    Wiring the clutch switch signal from Pin 13 of the white connector (on the Engine side) to the ECM required disassembling the ECM connector and identifying pin 39. The slots are numbered. Fortunately for me, all pins were populated, even if there was no wire. So I was able to steal the uncrimped pin 39 from the ECM connector and steal a length red/green wire and its connector from the leftover V6 harness's Red plenum connector to make a wire to make this connection. Unfortunately, the pin from the A4's ECM connector does not match the pin type that is used on the A6's ECM connector. But again, fortunately these pins are pre-populated with uncrimped and usable pins!
    DSC_2506
    DSC_2490
    DSC_2493
    DSC_2486
    DSC_2485
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  23. #183
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: White Connector: 3-Pin

    Large Red wire (SAI Pump Motor Power)

    White 3 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    The large red wire on the White 3-pin T3 connector is power for the SAI Pump Motor. I decided to keep Secondary Air Injection, for now at least. I figure I'll be a good boy and try to keep emissions low at startup. That and I don't want to worry about coding it out.
    On the B5, SAI Power is sourced from inside the car, under the dash, at the main power block. It is routed through the T10ar (Orange) 10-pin connector pin 4, then into the ECM box, to the large 50A fuse (S130), then to the SCR Pump Motor relay (as source power). The B5's 56-15_Y364 and 56-7_Y356 show this.

    A4: 56-15_Y364:
    56-15_Y364

    A4: 56-7_Y356:
    56-7_Y356

    Now, for the A6, the SAI Pump Motor power is routed through the white 3-pin connector instead. The origin for this power source is still under the dash at the main power block, but instead of going through the Orange 10-pin connector, it goes through pin 3 of the white connector. Once through the connector and into the plenum chamber, the source still goes through the large 50A fuse (S130) and then to the SAI Pump Motor relay as source power.

    A6: 5-10_EWD130:
    5-10_EWD130

    I decided to route power from the power block under the dash to the white 3-pin connector, pin 3 because the engine side harness already has the second half of this wiring path. Alternatively, I could've either moved the wire that was in the Orange connector over to the white connector, but that is on the car side of the connector and too hard to access. I could've also modified the engine side harness to allow the orange connector's pin 4 to connect to the S130 SAI Pump Motor Fuse, but that would involve populating the engine side's orange connector to accept this pin, as it is currently blank. Although I still have power going to the vehicle side orange connector pin 4, this is safe as the ECM side orange connector, pin 4 does not have a pin populated.

    Verifying the connection between pin 4 of the T10 orange connector and the power block inside the car (junction 30):
    DSC_2455
    DSC_2456
    DSC_2459
    DSC_2458

    The wiring for the white 15-pin and white 3-pin connectors is now complete.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  24. #184
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Red 15-Pin Connector

    The red 15 pin connector handles these components:
    • ABS Torque On Demand (TOD) signal. ABS can limit Engine torque when slip event occurs.
    • Indication of Quattro or FWD, Manual or Auto
    • A/C compressor cut-in signal
    • Instrument Cluster Low Fuel Warning Lamp


    Here is my wiring spreadsheet for the Red 15 Pin connector:
    Red 15 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    The Red 15 Pin connector actually requires no change for the 99.5 B5, fortunately. But I'll go ahead and explain my findings to show that all signals are mated properly.

    Pin 1 of the 15 pin connector for both the engine and the car is listed as the TOD signal. I have found this to be "Torque On Demand". Although I couldn't find much information on either the Audi or the Bosch ABS side, I have determined this signal must be the signal the ABS sends to the ECM to have the Engine reduce torque (throttle) to regain slip. AKA Traction control -or what VW/Audi calls ESP, I think.
    Both the car side and the engine side match signal name for name, color for color. So I've determined this safe to simply plug in.
    Diagram 4-10_EWD122 from the A6 and diagram 56/7_Y356 from the A4 look to match, for this signal.
    4-10_EWD122
    56-7_Y356

    Pin 2 of the 15 pin connector is a bit unclear. On the A6, this signal came from the E87/A7 (Climate Control Module) to the ECM's pin 40. Since this signal is passed between the climate control unit and the ECM, there could be a number of signals that this could be. Unfortunately I could not find a signal pinout for the Climate Control Module that was in the A6. From the wiring diagrams between the A6 and the A4, this seemed to simply be a signal to indicate whether or not the vehicle is FWD vs AWD, or automatic vs manual. The diagrams are very unclear because they don't always show signal names for pins/wires. But, since the A4 did not have this pin populated on the vehicle side (although it did for the engine side), I decided to simply connect and perform no wiring changes. This signal is one of my few educated guesses, but I figured this was the correct (and risk-free) route to take for this pin/signal.

    Section 5 (4.2L V8, engine code ART, my2001), Diagram 5-13_EWD132 for the A6 shows pin 15u/2 connecting ECM pin 40 to the climate control module pin A/7
    5-13_EWD132

    Section 4 (2.8L V6, engine code ATQ, my2001), Diagram 4-7_EWD121 for the A6 shows pin 15u/2 on the engine side going to ECM pin 40, but on the vehicle side it shows "For vehicles with all wheel drive and manually shifted transmission" 15u/2 going to the climate control module pin A/7. But "For vehicles with front wheel drive", 15u/2 instead goes to track 170, which is on Diagram 4-15_EWD125. Diagram 4-15_EWD125 track 170 shows this signal is routed to power via fuse S231, which draws power via Track 90 on Diagram 4-9_EWD122, Plus Connection (15) -power that is applied when the key is on. Diagram 4-15 track 170 also states that it only makes this A38 connection to key-on power "For vehicles with front wheel drive"
    4-7_EWD121
    4-15_EWD125
    4-9_EWD122

    For the A4 (on the vehicle side of the red 15 pin connector) pin 2 is blank/disconnected. But if I look into the diagrams I could try to see what this signal might be for.
    Now, in section 56 (2.8L V6, engine code AHA -which this war was equipped with stock), diagram 56-6_Y355 shows pin 15m/2 connecting ECM pin 10 to the A70 connector, which is key-on power through fuse 231, but there is a note that indicates "Quattro Only". This diagram cannot be accurate because this is a quattro vehicle, but the wire is not populated on the vehicle side of the connector.
    56-6_Y355

    In section 78 (2.8L V6, engine code ATQ, my2000), diagram 78-10_Y489, the 15m/2 connection mates it's ECM pin 40 (this engine uses a different ECM -which ECM, the same MExxx as the 4.2 engine?) to the same A70 connector, key on power through fuse 231. The asterisk beside this connection in this wiring section says "Front wheel drive only".
    78-10_Y489

    The only thing these diagrams convey to me is that this must be a signal to tell the ECM calibration whether or not the vehicle is a quattro or just a regular front wheel drive. I'm not really sure how the ECM would behave differently if it knew if it was controlling an AWD vs FWD car. Since one of the A6's configurations has a possibility for the signal to come from the climate control module, this makes me believe this signal must have something to do with climate control and engine power management. I might infer though, that diagram 56-6_Y355 has an incorrect comment, and that the comment should instead say "for front-wheel drive only". Then this diagram would match with the others, and with the wiring that was stock on the car (quattro, manual transmission, without this connection present). I could then say that this connection should only be made for front-wheel drive applications.

    Routing of pin 3 of the 15 pin red connector is almost as confusing as pin 2's routing. The Bentley manual does not have signal name labels on its diagrams, which would be useful. What I can see is that diagram 5-13_EWD132 shows ECM pin 41 being connected to E87 A/C control head, pin C15.
    5-13_EWD132

    Although this diagram is not super helpful for determining what signal this is, the document Audi_A6_C5_AirConditioner_ElectricalTesting.pdf page 01-279 shows the C15 pin connection is used for the AC Compressor Cut-In Signal -Signal to tell ECM to turn on AC Compressor (ECM will disable AC compressor under high load situation). I won't go into the detail of how I figured this out, but I will provide the documentation I found this information in. The document is a service procedure, and a particular test step requires connection of an adapter, and probing a certain pin on that adapter (which routes to pin C15). This test step is concerned with testing the A/C cut-in signal.
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0ByS...ew?usp=sharing

    The A4's 56-6_Y355 diagram shows pin 3 going to it's climate control's E87-C12 pin.
    56-6_Y355

    Yes, the A4's diagram shows this connection being made to a different climate control connector and pin, but keep in mind that they are two different climate control systems, and consider this:
    The A6 diagram 1-6_EWD29 is the A6 with the 2.8L V6 AHA engine, and it shows E87/C15 (which we've found to be A/C compressor cut-in signal) going to ECM/8. The A4 56-6_Y355 diagram shows E87/12 going to ECM/8. Therefore, we can deduce that since E87/C15 of the A6 is the A/C cut-in signal that goes to pin 8 of the ECM, and since the same ECM and engine is in the A4 -where ECM pin 8 goes to C12 of that climate control module, we can say that the A4's climate control module's C12 pin is the AC compressor Cut-In signal. That, and it is helpful that each vehicle's wiring scheme uses the same grey and black colored wire essentially routed to the same areas.
    1-6_EWD29

    So no change is needed for pin 3 of the 15-pin red connector.

    Pin 4 of the 15-pin red connector is blank on both the ECM (4.2) and the vehicle side.

    For Pin 5 of the 15-pin red connector, neither the A6's 4-10_EWD122 & 4-13_EWD124 diagrams nor the A4's 56-6_Y355 & 56-22_Y371 diagrams explicitly state what this signal is.
    On the A6, it's shown that pin 5 connects ECM pin 30 with the instrument cluster, T32 (blue), pin 6.
    4-10_EWD122
    4-13_EWD124

    On the A4, it's shown that pin 5 connects ECM pin 21 with the instrument cluster, T32a (green) pin 10.
    56-6_Y355
    56-22_Y371

    These are different instrument clusters though.
    Pin T32-6 (Blue) of the A6's instrument cluster can be identified by use of another helpful thread identifying A6 instrument cluster pinouts:
    http://www.audizine.com/forum/showth...ibility-issues

    Looking at this page, we can find under the "Blue 2000,2001 + " heading, pin 6:
    6 - Tank warning OBD 2

    Pin T32a-10 (Green) of the A4's instrument cluster can also be identified by use of a similar thread for A4 instrument cluster pinouts:
    http://www.audiworld.com/forums/a4-b...2797763/page3/

    Looking at this page, we can find under the "32-Pin Connector for Additional Functions, Green" heading, Pin 10:
    10 - Low fuel level warning-output signal for Engine Control Module (ECM)

    So, the Red 15-pin connector, pin 5, is for the low fuel indication (output) to the ECM.
    Again, in this case we are also helped by the fact that both vehicles use a purple/black wire for this signal -giving more indication that this is the same signal.

    Pins 6 through 13 of the red 15-pin connector are blank on both the 4.2 engine harness and the 1999.5 vehicle side.

    Pins 14 and 15 are CAN bus low and high (respectively). The A6's 4.2 engine harness uses this connection to communicate with the transmission -which this vehicle does not have. The A4's option appears to use this CAN datalink for connection to the climate control module. So as expected, the vehicle side does not have pins populated, but the 4.2 engine harness side does, as it came from a vehicle with an automatic transmission.
    Diagram 5-13_EWD132 of the A6, and diagram 56/7_Y356 of the A4 shows this connection, and these diagrams actually label the wires/connections indicating their purpose.
    5-13_EWD132
    56-7_Y356

    I simply connected these, as no CAN bus connection is needed.

    So as stated, for this specific application of the 4.2 ART engine from the 2000 A6 into a 1999.5 A4 vehicle originally equipped with manual transmission, quattro, and the 2.8 V6, this 15-pin is simply a plug and play connection.
    Last edited by 4Loops; 06-23-2017 at 07:23 AM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  25. #185
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Red 3-Pin Connector

    The Red 3 pin connector handles these components:
    • Reverse switch from transmission to illuminate reverse lamps
    • Crash Signal to ECM (not used on B5 -but can be added if you wish)


    Here is my wiring diagram for the Red 3 Pin connector:
    Red 3 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    Pin 1 of the 3-pin red connector is the reverse light signal from the transmission. This signal activates the reverse lamps.
    The vehicle side for this pin is shown in diagrams 56-12_Y361, 56-6_Y355, and 56-8_Y356.
    56-12_Y361
    56-6_Y355
    56-8_Y357

    As can be seen in the diagrams, the V6 harness' T3au pin 3 (engine harness side) goes to the transmission reverse light switch, pin 2. But the other side of the switch (pin 3) must be wired too. The other side of this switch is connected to the Brown connector, pin 5. The vehicle side of this brown connector, pin 5, show a connection to the A70 connection, which is a fused power source via S231, via key-on. So the brown connector pin 5 provides power, and that path is completed when the transmission is in reverse, which provides a logic "True" (12V) to the red 3-pin connector.

    The 4.2 engine harness side is of course unpopulated for both of these pins since the A6 was equipped with an automatic transmission.

    So, since this 4.2 engine was not originally equipped with a manual transmission, the reverse lamp switch wiring must be added to the engine-side harness.
    I removed the switch connector from the V6 harness. I removed the V6's pin 1 from the red 3-pin connector and pin 5 of the brown 10-pin connector with relative ease. This did require a push-pin and a couple of thicker/stronger needles to release the locking tabs on the pins though. With a little finagling both came out pretty easily. I can't say the same for a pin I had to extract from the black 10-pin connector. I had to hack the connector apart to extract the pin. More on that in a later post though.
    DSC_2671

    The 2.8 AHA V6 diagrams of section 56 show that in addition to this connection to the brown connector pin 5, another wire branches off to track number 75.
    Following to track 75, we see that this power signal is branched not only to the reverse light switch, but also to the mass airflow sensor, G70. Note that this circuit is only for the 2.8L V6 engine. The 4.2 V8 engine uses a different type of MAF sensor and connection (5-pin). That wiring is covered in the 10-pin Orange connector post. Since the MAF wire is not needed it can be clipped at the brown connector's pin 5.
    Once the two pins are extracted, the other wire going to the V6's MAF can be clipped off right at the pin. Pin 5 is crimped onto both wires.
    I wrapped the two wires in snake-skin, and then wrapped the transmission-side connector in enough electrical tape to water-proof it as much as possible. The water sealing boot was ripped on mine, so I couldn't reuse it.
    DSC_2672

    I was able to pull this small harness through the main engine harnesses dust boot, into the ECM plenum chamber by use of a claw-grabber and a little grease to help it through.
    DSC_2684
    DSC_2687
    DSC_2686

    I was then able to connect the pins into the appropriate connectors on the 4.2 harness.

    Pin 2 of the red 3-pin connector is used by the 4.2 engine for crash signal. I'm sure this stops the engine when it receives a signal (12V I'm sure). For the A4, the 2.8 engine did not use such a signal. I suppose it's not as safe per-say as the 4.2 engine then. It would probably be in one's best interest to connect this signal, but I did not. This signal is buried deep into the dash and I would have to disassemble the center console most likely to get to the airbag module to find this wire. I would also have a hard time populating a pin to the vehicle side red 3-pin connector since the vehicle side connectors are buried deep in the firewall. Call it lazy on my part, maybe. But I figured I'm no more vulnerable in a crash with the 4.2 engine with the crash signal inoperable than in a crash with the 2.8 engine -as it did not have this signal to begin with.
    I may change my mind in the future, but for now I left this disconnected.
    If one would choose to connect this signal, the wiring for this signal can be found in diagrams 5-7_EWD129 or 4-11_EWD123.
    5-7_EWD129
    4-11_EWD123

    Pin 3 of the red 3-pin connector is not populated on either the 4.2 engine harness side nor the vehicle side.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  26. #186
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Brown 10-Pin Connector

    The brown 10 pin connector handles these components:
    • Diagnosis K Line
    • Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)
    • Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS)
    • Starter Signal


    The 10 pin brown connector only needs a couple of changes. I will review each connection here for clarity, though.

    Here is my wiring diagram for the 10 pin brown connector:
    Brown 10 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    The brown connector needs attention for only two of the ten pins.

    Again, I'll simply cover each pin's connection and point out changes required.

    Pin 1 on both the 4.2 engine harness side and the vehicle side is the K-line for diagnosis (datalink, pre CAN). No change is required to either side.
    For the A6, diagrams 5-8_EWD129 and 5-15_EWD133 show this connection:
    5-8_EWD129
    5-13_EWD132

    For the A4, diagrams 56-9_Y358 and 56-20_Y369 show this connection:
    56-9_Y358
    56-20_Y369

    Pin 2 is the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) output from the ECM to the instrument cluster on both the 4.2 engine harness side and the vehicle side. Since the instrument clusters are different between the A6 and the A4, I'll explain:
    After physically checking the circuit, I've found that the wiring for my 2000 A6 4.2 ART vehicle actually follows the diagrams of section 4, the 2.8L V6 ATQ engine, MY2001.

    Diagrams 4-10_EWD122 and 4-14_EWD124 show the proper routing for the MIL lamp to the A6's instrument cluster, but the diagrams have the incorrect color of wire. The diagrams show a Yellow/Brown wire, but the actual wire color in the vehicle and on the 4.2 harness was Red/White. Nonetheless, this shows the brown connector's pin 2 going to the MIL indicator of the instrument cluster: T32a(Green)/14.
    4-10_EWD122
    4-14_EWD124

    Unfortunately, the diagrams from section 4 do not give any indication for what this signal could be. Section 2 (2.7L V6 APB MY2001) should clarify things a bit though:
    Section 2 pages 2-8_EWD113 and 2-16_EWD117 show the same incorrect wire color as section 4 (yellow/brown) but it does show the same connection from ECM pin 47, through pin 2 of the brown connector, to T32A(Green)/14. It also gives a bit more detail. The instrument cluster diagram actually looks correct, like the wires connecting to it actually go to the correct indicator within the drawing. It shows that this wire coming into the T32a(green) connector pin 4, is going to the K83 lamp, which the legend shows to be "Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)".
    2-8_EWD113
    2-16_EWD117

    It's also interesting to note that, within this same instrument cluster diagram drawing, other indicators seem to match to what appears to be connected to them -which gives further credibility to believing this T32a/14 is the MIL signal.
    The oil pressure warning light K3 is wired to the T32/10 instrument cluster pin, which follows to the oil pressure sensor F1.
    The speedometer G21 is wired to the T32/28 instrument cluster pin, which follows to the vehicle speed sensor G22.
    All other indicators and gauges appear to match as well. I'm sure it is safe to say that T32a/14 is the MIL lamp. Unfortunately, time and time again these Bentley manuals prove that the diagrams within should be taken with a grain of salt, and that physical inspection/verification is always wise.
    To further my findings, the comprehensive A6 instrument cluster pinout webpage/post lists T32A/14 as "CHECK" for the green connector, 2000+. While this really is a bit misleading (I thought this meant the "check" system of audi's older vehicles) it does further reinforce my findings.

    For the B5 side of things, tracking the routing is just as complicated. Bentley got it..... yes, WRONG again. Well, partially. Diagrams 56-6_Y355 and 56-19_Y368 show a connection from ECM pin 17 through the brown connector pin 2, to the instrument cluster T32(blue)/16, "Trailer Operation Indicator" lamp. This is a misprint from Bentley, as confirmed on several forums. Although the diagram routing is correct, T32(blue)/16 is actually the "Malfunction Indicator Lamp". The T32/16 connection to the "*Optional for all models" wire in diagram 56-19_Y368 does not exist.
    56-6_Y355
    56-19_Y368

    Following the wire to 56-24_Y373, it shows this optional wire would go to the emergency flasher relay. Maybe if this actually were a trailer operation connection, I imagine it might keep the turn signal lamps constantly on, whereas both would be blinking in unison for emergency flash mode. But since this is actually a MIL signal to the cluster, and this optional wire is not connected, I will pay the trailer operation indicator circuit no mind.
    Here is 56-24_Y373:
    56-24_Y373

    Here is a forum where this issue is discussed in length, with the conclusion that T32(blue)/16 is actually the MIL:
    https://www.audiforums.com/forum/b5-...estion-182206/
    This forum references the A4 cluster pinout page I have been using, to confirm (for cluster 2):
    https://www.audiworld.com/forums/a4-.../#post24120354

    So after all this investigation, pin 2 of the brown connector can simply be connected, 4.2 engine harness side to vehicle side of the '99.5 B5. Whew.

    Pin 3 of the brown connector is fairly straightforward. This pin carries the Vehicle Speed signal from the instrument cluster to the ECM, for both the A4 and the A6. I'll cover the complete VSS signal path both here and for the black 10-pin connector, since that connector is involved with this signal too.

    For the A6, Diagram 4-14_EWD124 shows the Vehicle Speed Sensor's (G22) pin 3/31 connected to ground, and the other, pin 2/G, connected through the black 10-pin connector pin 10 in the ECM plenum chamber via a brown/red wire, to the A6's instrument cluster T32(blue)/28. The signal then exits from the instrument cluster via T32(blue)/3 on a white/blue wire, through the brown 10-pin connector pin 3, to ECM pin 54. Diagram 4-7_EWD212 shows this connection from the instrument cluster to the ECM.
    4-14_EWD124
    4-7_EWD121

    For the A4, Diagram Diagram 56-21_Y370 shows the Vehicle Speed Sensor's (G22) pin 3/31 connected to ground, and the other, pin 2/G, connected through the black 10-pin connector pin 10 in the ECM plenum chamber via a brown/red wire, to the A4's instrument cluster T32(blue)/28. The same routing as the A6, from the VSS to the instrument cluster. The signal then exits from the instrument cluster via T32(blue)/3 on a white/blue wire, through the brown 10-pin connector pin 3, to ECM pin 20. Diagram 56-5_Y354 shows this connection from the instrument cluster to the ECM.
    56-21_Y370
    56-5_Y354

    So this is the same wire routing as the A6, exept for the final termination at the ECM. For both the A6 and the A4, the vehicle speed sensor is a 2-wire sensor, which is a magnetic pickup (sine wave) -versus a 3-wire sensor (hall effect), which would have a ground, power, and signal wire, and would put out a square wave.
    Since the sensors are the same type, the signal will be the same type (sine wave) -but we will still have to make sure that the tone wheel for the sensor has the same pattern/number of teeth, to give the same waveform. I am simply connecting these pins together, 4.2 engine harness side to vehicle side, and I will see if I get a valid signal. If I do not, I will have to investigate possibly coding the instrument cluster for a different tone wheel or tire size, or investigate tone wheel selection on the transmission axle. I am sure these are the same and the signal will be correctly read by the instrument cluster and the ECM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  27. #187
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Brown 10-Pin Connector -Part 2

    Pin 4 of the brown 10-pin connector is the starter signal from the starter interlock relay to the starter solenoid. Both the A6 and the A4 diagrams are quite clear on routing to the starter interlock, and match too.
    Both diagrams show the output signal from the starter interlock relay going through the brown connector's pin 4, through pin 1 of a 2-pin grey connector, to the starter solenoid (pin 50).
    The A6's diagram 4-3_EWD119:
    4-3_EWD119

    The A4's diagram 56-3_Y352:
    56-3_Y352

    Unfortunately, things become a bit muddled when tracing the B5's wiring to find what energizes (grounds) the starter interlock relay. From 56-3_Y352, we see that power is applied to one side of the coil of J226 (interlock relay), pin 4/A. This is the power signal that is also switched on by the relay that goes to the starter solenoid. We can trace this power source from rung 114 on diagram 56-11_Y360 and find this power source is available when the key is in the cranking position.
    56-11_Y360

    Since one side of the starter interlock relay is supplied power at ignition-crank position, the other side of the coil needs to be grounded at the same time while the ignition is in this same position. For the A6, this ground is simply supplied by a clutch-switch switching in ground, as seen in the A6's diagram 4-3_EWD119, shown above.
    For the A4, this ground signal is followed through rung 224 to diagram 56-20_Y369 to V94 (Central locking/Alarm System control module) pin C3.
    56-20_Y369

    Diagram 56-20_Y369 doesn't show what V94 module is in the legend, nor does it show a complete circuit for the switching of ground to the starter interlock relay coil.
    For a more complete diagram of the system as a whole on the B5, we can look at diagram 21-3_Y140. Section 21 is for the 2.8L AFC V6 engine, MY1997. It shows V94, and in the legend it has a correct description for what this module is. This diagram also shows only the pinouts on V94 that pertain to starting the engine. It shows pin C/3 coming from the coil of the starter interlock relay, just as section 56 does; but it also shows the completed path that flows through this module. The path to ground is from V94's C/2 pin, and through a black 10-pin T10f connector's pin 3, to a clutch pedal position switch, for manual vehicles. For automatic transmission equipped vehicles, this ground signal would come from the automatic transmission when it is in park or neutral. The diagram says that for pre 5/97 manual transmission B5s, the connection is made directly to ground. But in this case, I'm not sure what would be preventing the engine from starting with the clutch still engaged. This makes me again suspect of the diagram. Unless the module has another way of knowing that the clutch pedal is depressed.
    21-3_Y140

    Section 69 (central locking and anti-theft system section) 69-5_Y438 also shows how the ground signal could be sourced. Again, for manual transmissions, F194 Clutch Pedal Position Switch is used.
    69-5_Y438

    Here is an image of the clutch pedal position switch when the pedal assembly was uninstalled. The small position switch is the starter lockout switch for the clutch. The clutch must be fully depressed in order for the switch to close.
    DSC_0448

    Also to note: the clutch pedal position switch is also adjustable. So if you find that the switch engages and allows the engine is allowed to crank without the clutch fully released from the flywheel, the switch can be moved back. Or, I suppose, if the switch is so far back that it won't switch when the clutch is fully depressed, it can be moved forward. I decided to adjust mine for starters, in the same position it was in when installed on the other pedal bracket (where it sat in the middle of the paint). It was pretty clear where it's position was.
    DSC_0449

    So despite the rigors of following this starter lockout signal through pin 4 of the brown connector, there are no changes necessary. Simply plug and play.

    Pin 5 of the brown 10-pin connector will require a change. Pin 5 on the B5 vehicle side is supply power for the reverse lamp switch. Pin 5 is blank on the 4.2 engine harness side, as the A6 was not originally equipped with a manual transmission. This connection was already covered in the red 3-pin wiring post, refer to that post (pin 1) for how this connection is made and how the reverse lamp harness was added.

    Pin 6 of the brown 10-pin connector is not really needed. On the 4.2 Engine harness side, this pin is unpopulated. On the A4 vehicle side, Diagram 56-9_Y358 shows the brown 10-pin connector, pin 6, mating ECM pin 43 to T16/13 (diagnostic OBD port).
    56-9_Y358

    Pin 13 is power to the OBD port:
    OBD2 Connector Pinout

    If I find that I do not have power to the OBD port on pin 16 once the vehicle is operational, I can simply add a power wire.
    This signal is possibly plug and play.

    Pin 7 of the brown 10-pin connector is not populated on the A6 nor the A4. Simply plug and play.

    Pins 8 and 9 of the brown 10-pin connector are blank on the A4 vehicle side but populated on the 4.2 engine harness side. The A6 uses pin 8 to pass through power for the oil temperature and level sensor, and pin 9 to receive the signal from the sensor -both existing on the A6, but not on the A4 until ~2001 IIRC. Since my '99.5 A4 does not have this type of oil temperature sensor I will simply leave these pins unpopulated and simply connect. But, I will still supply oil temperature to the instrument cluster -as this is an important metric to keep an eye on, especially with a much larger heat-maker under the hood.
    I cannot simply use this level and temperature sensor because it is a smart-sensor, which multiplexes the temperature and level into a waveform that is interpreted by the instrument cluster. Since I am using the instrument cluster original to the '99.5 A4, this cluster has no input for a muxed temperature and level signal. So instead I have decided to apply the oil temperature sensor and circuit to the 4.2 engine. This required stealing the temperature sensor and harness from the 2.8 V6 and the use of a sandwich plate to place the temperature sensor on the vehicle. This analog temperature sensor is covered in the 10-pin black connector post. For this brown connector pins 8 and 9 I'll just explain how the 4.2 engine would have this temperature/level sensor wired as an FYI.
    For the A6, the oil level & temperature sensor circuit is shown on diagram 5-13_EWD132 and 5-9_EWD130.
    5-13_EWD132
    5-9_EWD130

    As the diagrams show, pin 8 supplies power to pin 1 (power input) of G266 (Oil Level Thermal Sensor -SRI). Following wiring track 93, the power is supplied to pin 1 on the A6 vehicle side from fuse S5. The G266 sensor's pin 2 is ground, and pin 3 leads back through the brown connector pin 9. From there we could follow track 187 to diagram 5-16_EWD133, and find this signal terminates at the A6's instrument cluster, pin T32a(green)/15.
    5-16_EWD133

    Again, since the 99.5 A4's instrument cluster does not have a provision for interpreting such a muxed oil temperature and level signal, I've decided to omit this type of sensor and simply leave the vehicle side unpopulated. I thought of more complicated methods of keeping this sensor such as placing an arduino or like microcontroller in line to interpret the signal and output a change in resistance for both the temperature and level -for level I would have to create a gauge or omit that signal. But I though of this as a very complicated solution to an otherwise simple problem. It is much easier to solve this problem through mechanical means -using the original sensor that was paired to the instrument cluster, and locate the sensor at the oil filter using a sensor sandwich plate. Again, details on this installation can be found in the black 10-pin connector post.

    Pin 10 of the brown 10-pin connector is used for Audi's autocheck system, on the A6. On the A4, this appears to be optional. On my 1999.5, this system is not present, as pin 10 is not populated.
    Diagram 10-2_EWD134 shows a connection from the ECM (pin unknown -the diagram does not show) through pin 10 of the brown connector, to the A6's autocheck system (J189) pin T32(blue)/25.
    10-2_EWD134

    The A4's diagram 56-7_Y356 shows how this autocheck system would be connected, if it were actually installed:
    56-7_Y356

    Unfortunately, the A4 does not have this autocheck system. It would be nice to have. It would alert you with an appropriate lamp/symbol to indicate a headlight or taillight is out. But a little research shows how annoying the system can be if you are using a bulb filament with incorrect resistance.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  28. #188
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Orange 10-Pin Connector

    The orange 10 pin connector is basically for ignition and emissions related signals. It handles these components:
    • Leak Detection Pump Motor Command
    • Leak Detection Pump RPM Feedback
    • Power to:
      >Ignition Coil Packs
      >Camshaft Adjusters
      >O2 Sensor Heaters
      >Secondary Air Injection (SAI) Solenoid
      >Evap Purge Regulator Valve
      >Fuel Injectors
      >Mass Flow Sensor


    Changes required for the orange 10 pin connector can become quite confusing when trying to match each power signal source with the same pin for the vehicle side and engine side of the connector. I've found that for the power supplies to the various components listed, it is not important to move power supply wires to "correct" pins, but rather it is more important to make sure the current wiring and fuse selection is appropriate for the components, leaving current pin assignment alone. For example, the ignition coil packs are supplied power via pin 1 on the orange connector on the A6, but on the A4 the coil packs receive their power via pin 5. As long as the wire gauge and fuse size is appropriate for the load, it does not really matter what pin the component's power source comes through -as each pin enters the vehicle, goes through a fuse, and to the power terminal block (key on power).

    Below is my wiring spreadsheet for the orange 10-pin connector. You will notice that I've color coded matching signal types blue, purple, or pink. I started this because initially I was going to move each signal's power source. I then decided that it was not necessary and an easier, just as proper method would work -resizing wires and fuses that need resizing. I left this color coding in my spreadsheet so you can easily identify like-signals.
    Orange 10 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    Pin 1 of the orange connector is one of the three power supplies for ignition and emissions related components.
    On the A6, this is power for the Ignition Coils and Camshaft Adjustment Valves, via fuse S229 (30A).
    ->(Diagrams 5-5_EWD128, 5-8_EWD129, 5-6_EWD128, 4-4_EWD119, 4-7_EWD121)
    5-5_EWD128
    5-8_EWD129
    4-4_EWD119
    4-7_EWD121

    On the A4, this is power to the O2 sensor heaters (all 4), power to the Secondary Air Injection Relay J316, power to the Camshaft Adjusters, Evap Valve, and Secondary Air Injection Solenoid Valve, via fuse S229 (20A).
    ->(Diagrams 56-4_Y353, 56-9_Y358, 56-7_Y356, 56-8_Y357, 56-17_Y366, 56-11_Y360)
    56-4_Y353
    56-9_Y358
    56-7_Y356
    56-17_Y366
    56-11_Y360

    For the A6, T10n (orange 10-pin connector) pin 1 can be found on diagram 4-4_EWD119. We can see that on the vehicle (supply) side of the connector, a 2,5 thickness wire comes from S229(30A), which is supplied by another 2,5 thickness wire, and following to track 63 on diagram 4-7_EWD121, we see this wire comes from the fuel pump relay's output pin, 87F(23). Section 5 diagrams show fuse S229 is supplied through the white 3-pin connector, and although this is the "correct" diagram section for this 4.2 A6, my 2000 A6 was wired as section 4 (2.8L section) shows.
    The take-away here is that a 30A fuse via a 2,5 thickness wire supplies power to the components (Ignition Coils and Camshaft Adjustment Valves) on the engine harness side of pin 1.

    For the A4, T10ar (orange 10-pin connector) pin 1 can be found on diagram 56-4_Y353. We can see that on the vehicle (supply) side of the connector, a 2,5 thickness wire follows to track 185 (56-17_Y336) (Bentley had a misprint of track 195), and is supplied by S229(20A). This fuse is then supplied by a 1,5 thickness wire (different than A6, supply gauge is less), and following through track 30 (back to 56-4_Y353), we see this wire comes from the fuel pump relay's output pin, 87F(23) -but on a 1,5 thickness wire.

    So it appears that the signal routing is the same on the supply side of the orange connector, pin 1. But the big (and important) difference here is the wire gauge size and the fuse size. On the A4, fuse S229 is (and should be no greater than) a 20A fuse because the supply wire to the fuse (from the fuel relay) is only a 1,5 size -whereas the A6's wire from the fuel relay is a larger 2,5 size, and thus can use a larger 30A fuse.

    So a solution would be to either keep the 20A fuse for this circuit and risk blowing fuses if the Ignition Coils and Camshaft Adjustment Valves ever draw too much current (We would rather blow fuses than burn a wire -and then the car -to a crisp), or we could easily employ a more appropriate fix: replace the 1,5 size wire from the fuel relay pin 87F(23) to the S229 fuse. I chose to replace the wire. It did take an hour or two of time, but I felt that this was time well spent to make this circuit proper.

    Stealing the 2,5 sized green wire from the A6 required first identifying S229. The fuses in the fuse box are listed as "27", "28", and "29", for S227, S228, and S229. If you get a close enough eye on the fuse holder you can see the numbers. Here is fuse S229:
    DSC_2703

    Fuse locations in this fuse holder are numbered the same on the A4 and the A6, which makes identification easier.

    Again, according to both sets of diagrams, between both the A4 and the A6, we are looking to "swap" the wire that goes from S229 to the fuel relay holder, pin 87F(23). According to the A4's diagram of 56-17_Y366 and 56-4_Y353, this is the green wire. The other side of S229 is green/red. So we want to extract the green wire:
    DSC_2705

    To remove the wire (pin) from the A4, first remove the fuse, and pull the magenta locking bar down to release the pins in that row. Extraction of the pin still requires a couple of thick needles and some patience.
    DSC_2706
    DSC_2707
    DSC_2712

    Here is the other end of the wire, on the A4. The post under the fuel pump relay is the relay's pin 87F(23) pin.
    DSC_2702

    On the A6, we can see that from diagram 4-7_EWD121 and physical inspection on the A6, this fuel relay pin 87F is run out to the same post. Here is this post on the A6:
    DSC_2713

    Notice that in the image, and the 4-7_EWD212 diagram, a smaller green/red wire is also connected to this post. It is safe for our purposes to cut this smaller green/red wire from the 2,5 thickness A6 wire, right at this connection. We can see that this green/red wire on the diagram runs through track 141 (4-13_EWD124) to fuse S228, and then to the fuel pump motor. So this wire is used to run the fuel pump motor when the fuel relay is on.
    If we look at the A4's diagram 56-4_Y353, we see that this fuel pump motor run signal is actually commanded through the 87F/S2 (part of the relay holster, but electrically the same as the post). On the A4, this is actually a green wire instead of a green/red wire like the A6 used to supply the fuel pump motor, but the wire is the same size (1,5) and it goes to the same places. Track this wire to track 183 on diagram 56-17_Y366, through fuse S228, and then through track 231 on diagram 56-21_Y370, to the fuel pump.
    So that proves it: the green/red wire can be snipped from the wire that's stolen from the A6:
    DSC_2716

    Here is what the pin extracted from the fuse holder looks like, so you can get a good idea of where to wiggle your pin to depress the tabs:
    DSC_2711

    Complete wire extracted (can't remember which one this is -the A4 wire or the A6 wire):
    DSC_2718

    Here's an image of the two wires (once extracted) side-by-side, to see the difference in their size. It's not a huge difference visually, but it definitely is a heavier gauge wire as the diagrams promise:
    DSC_2723

    Once both wires are extracted, the thicker 2,5 sized wire can be reinstalled into the A4. Only then can we insert the (now) appropriately sized 30A fuse.
    DSC_2725
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  29. #189
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Orange 10-Pin Connector -Part 2

    Pin 2 of the 10-pin Orange connector is for the accelerator position fault light activation. The 4.2 engine will send a signal to the instrument cluster if the ECM notices an error with the accelerator pedal. The accelerator pedal is a dual potentiometer component. If position sensor 1 and position sensor 2 drift out of correspondence, a fault will be set, the engine will return to idle, and the lamp would be set (ECM output signal to instrument cluster). The vehicle side of this connector/pin is not populated, as it was initially equipped with the 2.8 cable actuated throttle. Since this is the case, and since simple diagnostics could find a faulty accelerator pedal, I decided to leave this connection incomplete. Adding to my decision, the instrument cluster originally from the A4, which I decided to keep, does not have a lamp for an accelerator pedal error lamp.
    For the A6, the circuit would be completed as described in diagrams 4-11_EWD123, 4-13_EWD124, 1-19_EWD106:
    4-11_EWD123
    4-13_EWD124
    1-19_EWD106

    Pin 3 of the 10-pin Orange connector is unpopulated on both the 4.2 engine harness side and the vehicle side of the connector.

    Pin 4 of the 10-pin Orange connector is blank on the 4.2 engine harness side, but populated on the vehicle side of the connector. The A4 used this pin for the Secondary Air Injection (SAI) pump motor supply power. The 4.2 engine harness accepts power for the SAI motor through the white 3-pin connector, as covered in a previous post. Since that post mentioned connecting that pin's SAI power wire to a power source, this orange connector's pin 4 (source power) is no longer needed. It is ok to simply connect this pin, with the engine side's pin 4 unpopolated.
    Here is how the A4 had the SAI pump motor power wired when the 2.8 was installed (Diagrams 56-7_Y356 and 56-15_Y364):
    56-7_Y356
    56-15_Y364


    Pin 5 of the 10-pin Orange connector is the second of three emissions/ignition supply power sources.
    On the A6, pin 5 is supply power to the fuel injectors. The fuel injectors on the A4 are powered through pin 8.
    On the A4, pin 5 is supply power to the coil packs. The coil packs on the A4 are powered through pin 1.

    Again, what really matters here is sizing of the source signal from the vehicle to meet the attached components' needs.
    On the A6, the 4.2 engine's components powered by pin 5 is shown in diagrams 5-4_EWD127, 5-5_EWD128, 5-6_EWD128, 5-10_EWD130, and 5-9_EWD130.

    Diagram 5-4_EWD127 shows T10n/5 (engine side) wire size of 2,5 going to the D131 connector. Following that wire to the next diagrams, 5-5_EWD128 and 5-6_EWD128, we see this connection goes to each fuel injector. The injectors are low-side driven. When the ECM want's to inject fuel, the injector is grounded by the ECM.

    On the A6's vehicle side we see a 2,5 sized wire connecting to the B135 connector. A 0,35 (small diameter) sized wire branches off here through rung 110 to power the cruise control stalk (Diagram 5-10_EWD131). The cruise control wiring was covered in the white connector post. The power to this B135 connector comes from fuse S232(20A). This fuse is fed by a 2,5 sized wire coming from the A2 plus connection in the instrument panel wiring harness. We can take an educated guess that the largest diameter wire in the connection is the source to this conneciton. This is power from the ignition.
    So the main takeaway from these diagrams is that the fuel injectors on the 4.2 engine are supplied power through the orange connector, pin 5, via a 2,5 sized wire and a 20A fuse.

    5-4_EWD127
    5-5_EWD128
    5-6_EWD128
    5-10_EWD130
    5-9_EWD130

    On the A4's vehicle side of pin 5 is shown in diagrams 56-10_Y359, 56-17_Y366, and 56-11_Y360.

    On the A4's vehicle side, T10ar/5 shows a 2,5 sized wire supplying the pin. Following the wire to rung 186 on diagram 56-17_Y366, we find it connects through it's A20 connection, to fuse S232(20A). S232 is also fed by a 2,5 wire, and following track 116 to diagram 56-11_Y360, we see it is connected through an A2 connection. This connection is the same as the A6's A2 connection in that it is supplied by a 4,0 sized wire from the ignition switch.

    56-10_Y359
    56-17_Y366
    56-11_Y360

    So, since both the A6 and the A4 have a 2,5 sized wire with a 20A fuse supplying power to pin 5 of the orange pin, the 4.2's injectors will be powered appropriately, with no change to this pin. One can simply connect this pin, engine side to vehicle side.

    Pin 6 of the orange 10-pin connector is the Leak Detection Pump RPM signal on both the A6 and the A4. It requires no change, but I'll show the diagrams of each to compare.
    The A6's diagram 5-4PEWD127:
    5-4_EWD127

    The A4's diagram 56-8_Y357:
    56-8_Y357

    The A4's diagram shows V144 (Leak Detection Pump) drawing incorrectly. The diagram shows that the leak detection pump as a relay. Since this is a pump we should see a motor icon with a mag-pickup sensor builtin, just as the A6's diagram shows. I may have to come back to this post and edit to say the A6's leak detection pump will have to be fitted to the A4, if the 4.2 engine's ECM does not like the waveform coming back from the leak detection pump. For now, I am going to assume they are the same pump with the same feedback signal.

    Pin 7 of the Orange 10-pin connector is the activation signal (the motor drive signal) for the Leak Detection Pump. Refer to the above diagrams to follow this signal as well, for the A6 and the A4. It also requires no change.

    Pins 6 and 7 of the Orange 10-pin connector can be connected (engine side and vehicle side) with no changes.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  30. #190
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Orange 10-Pin Connector -Part 3

    Pin 8 of the Orange 10-pin connector is another power supply from the vehicle to supply emissions/ignition components on the engine.

    On the A6, this connection serves power to the O2 sensor heaters (all 4), the Mass Air Flow Sensor G70, the N112 Secondary Air Injection Solenoid, N144 Left and N145 Right Electro-Hydraulic Engine Mount Solenoid Valves, the N80 Evap Canister purge regulator valve, the N261 Intake Manifold Tuning Valve (swirl flap) 2, the N156 Intake change-over valve, and the J299 Secondary Air Injection Pump Relay.
    Diagrams 5-12_EWD131, 5-4_EWD127, 5-11_EWD131, and 5-10_EWD130 show these components and their source from the vehicle.
    5-12_EWD131
    5-4_EWD127
    5-11_EWD131
    5-10_EWD130

    On the A4, this connection serves power to the fuel injectors.
    Diagrams 56-4_Y353 and 56-17_Y366 show the fuel injectors' source from the vehicle.
    56-4_Y353
    56-17_Y366

    For the A6, diagram 5-12_EWD131 shows the vehicle side of pin 8 is a 2,5 sized wire coming from fuse S234(25A). This fuse also supplies power (via track 28 on diagram 5-4_EWD127) through a 1,0 sized wire, to the plus connection on the Leak Detection Pump motor. The source to the S234 fuse is via another 2,5 sized wire to the switched output (pin 87a) of the Fuel Pump Relay (J17).

    The main take-away here is that a 2,5 sized wire comes from the switched output of the Fuel Pump Relay, through fuse S234 (which is a 25A fuse), and via another 2,5 sized wire connects to pin 8 of the orange 10-pin connector.

    For the A4, diagram 56-4_Y353 shows that the vehicle side of T10ar/8 is a 2,5 sized wire supplied by track 190 on diagram 56-17_Y266, which leads to fuse S234. In this case, the A4's S234 fuse is a 15A fuse. But, following the fuses source, we see that a 2,5 sized wire supplies it -just as the A6's wiring. Following to track 28 on diagram 56-4_Y353, we see that this 2,5 sized wire is sourced from the Fuel Pump Relay (J17), pin 87a (switched output), just as the A6 circuit is drawn.

    So since this is the case, it is safe to make no change to any of the wiring, and connect pin 8 (engine and vehicle side) of the orange 10-pin connector, but do change the S234 fuse to a 25A fuse to provide the needs of the 4.2 engine as illustrated in the A6 diagrams.

    Pin 9 is unpopulated on both the engine harness side and the vehicle side of the Orange 10-pin connector.

    Pin 10 of the Orange 10-pin connector is the A/C cutoff signal to the ECM, for the A6. This signal should toggle high when the coolant level is too low or temperature is too high. On the A4 this pin is not populated and this feature does not exist with the A4's cluster. This feature would be nice, but it is really only there for the knuckleheads who don't know to turn off their AC when the engine is overheating. Since I am using the A4's original cluster, no change is required for this connection.
    Here is the A6's diagrams 2-4_EWD111 and 2-16_EWD117 (section 5 or 4 does not show pin 10 of the orange connector):
    2-4_EWD111
    2-16_EWD117

    Here is the link for the A6 cluster pinout, too, that helps illustrate what T32(blue)/12's purpose is:
    http://www.audizine.com/forum/showth...ibility-issues
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  31. #191
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Black 10-Pin Connector: Part 1

    The Black 10-pin connector handles the following signals:
    • Alternator Sense (Voltmeter) to instrument cluster
    • Engine speed (RPM) signal to instrument cluster
    • Oil Pressure sensor to instrument cluster
    • ECM Power
    • Coolant Level sensor to instrument cluster
    • Coolant Temperature sensor to instrument cluster
    • Fuel Pump Relay enable (ground) signal from ECM
    • Oil Temperature sensor to instrument cluster
    • Vehicle Speed Signal (VSS) to instrument cluster


    Here is a snippet of the wiring spreadsheet for the 10-pin connector:
    Black 10 Pin
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...ZKd-dg/pubhtml

    Only one wiring change/addition is necessary for this connector. I will describe each pin's connection below, though.

    Again, here are links to the A4 and A6 instrument cluster pinout posts, for help in mapping the following signals:
    https://www.audiworld.com/forums/a4-...2797763/page3/
    http://www.audizine.com/forum/showth...ibility-issues

    Pin 1 of the Black 10 pin connector is the voltage sense from the alternator to the instrument cluster for both the A6 and the A4. The instrument cluster displays the battery's voltage and it will display the battery symbol and beep when the alternator is not charging.

    For the A6, diagrams 5-3_EWD127 shows the Alternator sense signal going through a 3-pin connector, to pin 1 of the black 10-pin connector. On the vehicle side, pin 1 goes to the fan control module via track 155 on 5-14_EWD132, and also to the instrument cluster T32a(green/12) via track 169 on diagram 5-15_EWD133.
    5-3_EWD127
    5-14_EWD132
    5-15_EWD133

    For the A4, diagram 56-3_Y352 shows a wire leading from the alternator through a 2-pin connector to the Black 10-pin connector T10m/pin 1. The vehicle side shows this signal then travels through track 214 on diagram 56-19_Y368 to T32(blue)/12.
    56-3_Y352
    56-19_Y368

    Since these signals are the same and follow the same path, there is no change necessary for pin 1 of the black 10-pin connector.

    Pin 2 of the Black 10 pin connector is the engine speed signal (ESS) for both the A6 and the A4.

    For the A6, diagram 5-13_EWD132 shows the connection between pin 2 of the black connector to the ECM pin 30. On the engine side of the harness, track 183 follows to diagram 5-16_EWD133, to the instrument cluster's T32(blue) pin 11, which aligns with the tachometer gauge in the drawing. The instrument cluster post confirms this connection.
    5-13_EWD132
    5-16_EWD133

    For the A4, diagram 56-5_Y354 shows the connection between pin 2 of the black connector and the ECM pin 6. On the engine side of the harness, track 224 follows to diagram 56-20_Y369, to the instrument clustter's T32(blue) pin 11, just as the A6's wiring. The instrument cluster drawing in the A4 diagram does not show gauges or indicators, but the instrument cluster pinout post on the A4 cluster could confirm.

    So there is no change necessary for pin 2 of the Black 10 pin connector. This is the Tachometer signal from the ECM to the instrument cluster. The only thing to worry about though, is making sure the 4.2 ECM and 2.8 ECM sends the same signal to it's intended instrument cluster. If this is a different signal, the instrument cluster of the A4 might not recognize (or read properly) the signal from the ECM. If this is the case, the instrument cluster may likely be able to be reconfigured for a V8's signal (again, if it is different). If there is no way, I will still choose to keep the instrument cluster. I would then use a microcontroller to modify the waveform (translate) so the instrument cluster would read properly. The wiring here is proper, but signal diagnosis may be required as I slowly wake the car to life.

    Pin 3 of the Black 10 pin connector is for the oil pressure sensor, on both the A6 and the A4.

    For the A6, diagram 5-16_EWD133 shows the Oil pressure switch (F1) -which is a one wire sensor, grounded by the block, has it's signal wire going through a 2-pin connector, to the Black 10-pin (T10p)/pin3, and then to the instrument cluster, pin T32(blue)/10. The wiring diagram does appear to have the K3 lamp (oil pressure warning light) aligned with the pin.
    5-16_EWD133

    For the A4, diagram 56-21_Y370 shows the Oil pressure switch (F1) -which is also a one wire sensor that is grounded by the block, has it's signal wire going to the Black 10-pin (T10m)/pin 3, and then to T32(blue)/10. The wiring diagram's drawing for the instrument cluster here is not accurate; the oil pressure warning light is not even in the drawing:
    56-21_Y370

    A look at the cluster pinout posts will help to clear any further confusion. The signals to the Black 10-pin connector, pin 3 are the same though, so they can be connected without any further worry.

    Pin 4 of the Black 10 pin connector is power to the ECM for both the A4 and the A6.

    For the A6, diagram 4-6_EWD120 (from the 2.8 engine section) shows this pin connecting ECM pin 62 directly to the 30 (power) terminal in the vehicle. Section 5 (4.2 engine section) also shows pin 4 of the black 10-pin connector, but the vehicle did not follow this wiring.
    4-6_EWD120

    For the A4, diagram 56-4PY353 shows pin 4 connecting ECM pin 3 to the 30 (power) terminal in the vehicle.

    So no change is necessary, as this connection will feed power to the 4.2 engine's ECM/pin 62 via the A4's vehicle 30 (power) terminal.

    Pin 5 of the Black 10 pin connector is the ground for the Coolant Level and Coolant Temperature sensors. (A6: 5-8_EWD129 & 5-16_EWD133) (A4: 56-5_Y354 & 56-21_Y370)
    Pin 7 of the Black 10 pin connector is the signal for the Coolant Level sensor (to the instrument cluster). (A6: 5-16_EWD133) (A4: 56-21_Y370)
    Pin 9 of the Black 10 pin connector is the signal for the Coolant Temperature sensor (to the instrument cluster). (A6: 5-16_EWD133 & 5-8_EWD129) (A4: 56-21_Y370, 56-5_Y354)

    For the A6's Coolant Temperature Sensor, diagram 5-8_EWD129 shows the G62/G2 coolant temperature sensor. It shows the Black 10-pin connector, pin 5 supplies ground to the sensor's pin 2. This component is actually a dual temperature sensor. One internal temperature sensor signal feeds the instrument cluster for display, the other sensor signal feeds the ECM a temperature (resistive) signal. Pin 1 of the ECT sensor is used for instrument cluster display. Following track 190 to 5-16_EWD133, we see the signal travels back through the black connector, pin 9, to the instrument cluster's T32(blue)/8. Pin 3 of the ECT sensor uses a different ground connection (220), and that signal goes back to the ECM, pin 93.
    For the A6's Coolant Level Sensor, diagram 5-8_EWD129 shows this sensor's ground is the same as the ECT sensor: connection 139. Follow the track to 5-16_EWD133 and we will find the coolant level sensor F66. Pin 3 is the ground pin, and pin 1 of the sensor leads back through the black 10-pin connector to T32(blue)/22 of the instrument cluster.
    5-8_EWD129
    5-16_EWD133

    For the A4's Coolant Temperature Sensor, the wiring is the same as on the A6. Diagram 56-5_Y354 shows the G62/G2 coolant temperature sensor. It shows the Black 10-pin connector, pin 5 supplies ground to the sensor's pin 2. This sensor is also a dual temperature sensor -actually, the same sensor. Pin 1 of the ECT is used for the instrument cluster display. We can follow track 237 to diagram 56-21-Y370, and then the signal through the black connector's pin 9, to T32(blue)/8. Pin 3 of the A4's ECT is grounded separately at the 220 connection, like the A6, and pin 4 of the ECT sensor connects to pin 53 of the ECM, feeding the ECM a separate temperature signal.
    For the A4's Coolant Level Sensor, diagram 56-5_Y354 shows T10m/5 -on the engine side of the connector, also splits to go to track 241 on diagram 56-21_Y370. We can see that this ground pin is connected to pin 3 of the coolant level sensor, and pin 1 of this sensor passes back through the black connector, pin 7, to land at the instrument cluster's T32(blue)/pin 22.
    56-5_Y354
    56-21_Y370

    So since the coolant level and temperature sensors are connected in the same way, using the black connector's pins 5, 7, and 9, there is no change necessary.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  32. #192
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ECU Plenum Chamber Connectors: Black 10-Pin Connector: Part 2

    Pin 6 of the Black 10-pin connector requires a change. On the A4, this pin is used for the oil temperature signal. On the A6, this pin is not populated, as the 4.2 engine uses the oil temperature/level sensor in the bottom of the oil pan. The A6's oil level/temperature sensor is a smart sensor. It multiplexes the oil level and temperature signals on a single wire, and the instrument cluster decodes this waveform. The earlier post detailing the Brown connector's pin 8 covers this in greater detail, so I won't cover that again here. What I will cover here, though, is the need to add the hardwired oil temperature sensor from the V6 motor that is intended to connect to the cluster from the A4. Since I'm keeping the original cluster from the A4, I will have to do this. If the cluster from the A6 were used, the oil level/temperature sensor could instead be used.

    The A4's oil temperature sensor wiring is as follows: The oil temperature sensor is a 1-pin resistive sensor. Its ground is via the engine block and the pin is the signal. Diagram 56-22_Y371 shows the output of this sensor connects through the Black 10-pin connector, pin 6, and then to the instrument cluster's pin T32a(green)/pin 21.
    56-22_Y371

    Since there is no hardwired oil temperature sensor on the 4.2 engine, I'll have to steal the one from the V6 motor. It is located on the front of the engine. Be sure to have the oil drained first or this will create quite a mess. The harness can also be stolen from the V6 engine harness. This small wiring harness on the V6 includes the sensor wires for its oil temperature and pressure sensors. They share a common 2-pin connector that is not shown in the diagram. Since the 4.2 engine already has an oil pressure sensor and required wiring, we can snip this wire off of the stolen harness:
    DSC_2728

    This harness pulls apart in two sections. The lower section goes to the sensor (shown above) and the upper section connects to the black 10-pin connector, pin 6. To add the (now one-wire) harness to the 4.2 engine harness, the upper section will have to be stolen from the 2.8 engine harness's black 10-pin connector. As I've shown before, the pins can be extracted from the connectors with some finesse -but after an hour of battling this connector and breaking several needles to extract the pin, frustration set in and I decided to hack the connector apart (carefully) to extract the pin:
    DSC_2690
    DSC_2694
    DSC_2695

    Once the pin is extracted, this top part of the oil temperature/pressure harness (now only oil temperature now that the pressure wire has been clipped off) can be added to the 4.2 engine's main harness. The wire can be pulled through the 4.2 harness' dust boot with a reach-claw, just as the reverse switch wiring was installed in an earlier post. Again, a little grease on the harness makes this slide right through. Now that the pin is through the dust boot, the oil temperature pin can be connected to the 4.2 harness' black 10-pin connector, pin 6.

    Now that the wiring is installed, the oil temperature sensor must find a home on the 4.2 engine. There is no port for it to screw into, so I decided to install an oil sensor sandwich plate. I got a simple 'el cheapo off of ebay for about $13. We will see how well it works out. All of the sandwich plates (everywhere) seem to only have 1/8NPT fittings. This oil temperature sensor's threads is M10x1. I read that this sensor will fit into a 1/8NPT fitting as they are very close in thread type and size. We will see how tightly it fits when it arrives. If it is too sloppy I will order an adapter fitting.
    Oil sensor sandwich adapter

    I will revisit this post to add installation details when the adapter is in.

    (Edit/Update): The generic sandwich adapter will NOT work. If I had spent a little more time on research before a purchase, I would've found this topic in bhusted's forum, where bhusted, Nollywood, and Audihere! were discussing thermostatic oil sandwich plates. The actual size of the oil filter thread is M24x2. This is larger than the 3/4x16 size that I had bought. I knew it wasn't possible the Germans would decide to put a non-metric thread or size on anything. Live and learn I suppose. I am going to find somewhere else to mount the oil temperature sensor, as no one makes an M24x2 sandwich plate. I think I will also go ahead with the thermostatic sandwich plate. More on that when I have it ordered and start to install it.

    I'll have to update this section again with my final solution for relocating the oil temperature sensor.

    (Edit/Update): I have found a solution for installing the oil temperature sensor from the 2.8 engine on the 4.2 engine. I ended up connecting both oil pressure and oil temperature resistive sensors through the oil port where the oil pressure sensor goes, just outside the oil filter on the oil cooler/right side engine mount. This required that I remove the oil pressure sensor, install a "T", and a "90", to connect both sensors to the same port.
    For starters, I removed the oil temperature sensor from the V6, which is on the front of the engine:
    DSC_2985
    DSC_2988
    DSC_2987

    I ordered two M10x1 T-adapters (male, female, female). VDO part#240-850:
    DSC_2966

    I tried to find one "T" and one "90", but I could not find a "90". So I just bought two "T"'s, and plugged the end with a set-screw. I could've also used a short screw here too.
    Threading the T's and the sensors in while the engine was already in the car was a real peach. I should've thought of this while the engine was out. Although the space is small, it can still be done. I had to use an assortment of copper crush-washers to allow the T-fittings to point in an appropriate direction once tightened down. This is a brass fitting threading into an aluminum piece, so a little tight is appropriate. I don't have a torque spec to share. If a leak is found it can always be tightened. I probably also should've used some thread-dope to help the seal, but I'm sure it will be fine. For the critical thinkers out there: I'm sure pipe dope will still be fine to use even though the sensor requires a ground path through the block. When tightening the threads, metal to metal contact will still be made; the pipe-dope will only fill in the gaps between the threads.
    So, I had to arrange these copper crush washers in a way that the first T -closest the engine, would point rearward toward the oil filter. It cannot point up, as the oil temp sensor would foul against the exhaust manifold. It cannot point down, because the sensor would foul against the hump in the oil cooler leading to the oil filter. The second T I could've made point frontward or rearward. Pointing up would be against the exhaust manifold. It might not have hit it, but it would be much too hot there. Straight down was the engine mount, and I thought it best not to be pointing directly there, so I went forward/down -ish with the second (pressure) sensor. It is best to place the temperature sensor closest to the engine (the first "T") as it is a smaller sensor and will fit better. It is also not covered with a plastic connector either, which would probably become a bit melty over time. I think it works best this way, anyway. The temperature sensor being the closest would read a more accurate temperature than it would further away, and the pressure sensor should read the same in either location. The further the pressure sensor is away, the more delayed a pressure may be read, but this not far from the engine, and for what the sensor is, I'm sure it wouldn't matter.
    DSC_2992
    DSC_2994

    Pin 8 of the Black 10-pin connector is used for ECM activation of the Fuel pump relay (located inside the vehicle) by grounding the relay, via this pin. This is the case on both the A6 and the A4.

    On the A6, diagram 5-12_EWD131 shows the connection that connection pin 8 makes between the ECM's pin 65 and the Fuel Pump Relay's pin 85. The other side of the relay's coil is pin 86, and that can be followed through track 21 on diagram 5-4_EWD127 to go to the A2 power connection. The ECM grounds the relay coil to turn on the fuel pump relay.
    5-12_EWD131
    5-4_EWD127

    On the A4, diagram 56-4_Y353 shows this same connection, from the ECM (pin 4) to the fuel pump relay coil (pin S). The diagram also shows that the other side of the coil is connected to power connection 15.

    Since the signal is the same on pin 8 between the A4 and the A6, there is no change required. Simply connect pin 8 of the engine harness's black 10-pin connector to the vehicle's connector, pin 8.

    Lastly, pin 10 of the Black 10-pin connector is used for Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) signal from the sensor to the instrument cluster. The brown 10-pin connector's pin 3 handles carrying this VSS signal from the instrument cluster to the ECM.

    For the A6, diagram 4-14_EWD124 shows the vehicle speed sensor's signal (G22) is routed through the black 10-pin connector's pin 10, to T32(blue)/pin28:
    4-14_EWD124

    For the A4, diagram 56-21_Y370 shows the vehicle speed sensor's signal (G22) is also routed through the black 10-pin connector's pin 10, to T32(blue)/pin 28:
    56-21_Y370

    Since both the A4 and the A6 are wired the same, there is no wiring change necessary for pin 10 of the black 10-pin connector. I may find, however, that if the VSS sensor's signal for the A4 and A6 are different, I may have to recode the instrument cluster to be able to read the signal properly. I will learn if that is necessary when I have the vehicle moving under its own power.
    Last edited by 4Loops; 06-23-2017 at 07:23 AM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  33. #193
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    ..And there we have it. Wiring done. BOOM. -Finally, a year later and many obstacles later, wiring is complete and fully documented.
    -I did say I'd try to make this a detailed B5 A4 4.2 V8 swap, didn't I?

    While working on wiring, I have also installed my intake manifold and fuel rail, got my radiator and condenser finished, and am getting close to starting it under its own power. Woohoo!
    Last edited by 4Loops; 06-02-2017 at 12:05 PM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  34. #194
    Active Member Two Rings
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    This is amazing, super helpful. With all this information, it's going to make building a harness outside the car MUCH easier. Cheers to you brother, thanks for all this!! And congrats on completing the wiring!

  35. #195
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkyA4 View Post
    This is amazing, super helpful. With all this information, it's going to make building a harness outside the car MUCH easier. Cheers to you brother, thanks for all this!! And congrats on completing the wiring!
    Thanks Sky!
    Yea, I hope it helps. The wiring is an area where I felt I could contribute. I've noticed this is the subject all the other swap threads tend to gloss over, because it is just so darn difficult to figure out let alone document. This, and with each car being slightly different with mid-year changes -and for you particularly, having (I'm assuming) a Canadian car with daytime running lights.
    Best of luck!
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  36. #196
    Active Member Two Rings
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    Yeah, I'm going to try to make as many notes as possible when I do the wiring in mine. I have a late 01 Canadian a4 hahah, I'm sure there's some differences for sure that no ones documented yet. But all the information you've given, with all the wiring diagrams, you've given some serious insight on where to start haha. I really do wish more people would post information like this when it comes to swaps.

  37. #197
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Strut Bar

    I decided to steal the strut bar off of the C5 and install it on the B5. I may have mentioned wanting to do this earlier but for the life of me I couldn't find what I did with the bar. I found it in the front seat of the C5 the other day, so I decided to throw it in. Installation wasn't too difficult, but the bar did require some modification. I stole the strut bar mounts off the C5's strut towers a while ago and had installed them. They fit perfectly on the B5. The A6 is a bit wider of a car, so the strut bar had to be cut to length and mounting holes drilled. Once that was taken care of, the bar slipped right in like it belonged.
    Once the bar was attached to the left side of the car,
    DSC_2806

    it was too long by this much:
    DSC_2803

    After the modification:
    DSC_2804
    DSC_2805
    Last edited by 4Loops; 06-23-2017 at 06:41 AM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  38. #198
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Loops View Post
    because it is just so darn difficult to figure out let alone document. This, and with each car being slightly different with mid-year changes -and for you particularly
    This. I feel bad when guys ask me about what I did for wiring and I say I really cant help. Every car is different, never thought there would be so many differences between the cars. When people ask me what I did I said you got to get the wiring diagrams for the car itself and for the motor/donor car and look it all over. What I did in my situation might not be the same for others and I do not want to tell someone to wire something a certain way and it causes damage. I feel people get annoyed at me and feel I holding back secrets, but that's not the case.
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  39. #199
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    I hear ya. I was also surprised by the number of *Midyear change and *Rolling change comments in the Bentley manuals. If it's this bad for Audi -which produced many thousands of these.. I couldn't imagine what it would be like trying to understand a DeLorean! I read up on these a bit -being one of many kids influenced by BTTF- remember reading that there were no yearly changes, but rather rolling changes -every other month! Yeiks. I can't imagine the amount of testing that wasn't possible to be accomplished because of so many regular changes. But you're absolutely right. Service manuals and actual vehicle verification are certainly needed in this case.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  40. #200
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
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    Intake Manifold Install

    Earlier in this thread I discussed my troubles with the intake manifold -specifically around frozen swirl flaps. With the original intake, the swirl flap shafts and/or the swirl flap bushings had swollen or the surface became lodged with debris. Either way, they were stuck and would not pivot, so I took to removing them. I inadvertently sheered one bushing and mushroomed the other trying to remove them. The bushings had pressed themselves into the manifold and was very difficult to remove, and unfortunately resulted in ruining both of them. As I mentioned, the intake manifolds I was finding at the time were quite expensive (in the three to four hundred dollar range) so I decided to machine my own swirl flap bushings. While I was making some progress with this, I found it was taking quite a bit of time with the sub-par CNC-MIL I had at my disposal. The system would constantly freeze or not stop its direction of travel. Around this time I was recommended to use an intake from an A8 D3 (06) 4.2 engine, and I was able to find one on ebay in a matter of a couple of months of scouring the site, for $75. What a deal and what a time saver! I did find though, that the intake from the D3 is a dual stage manifold while the original intake on the A6 C5 was a three stage intake. The D3 still uses the second vacuum pod, but not to increase runner length (the D3's is just short or long), but to operate a flap in the airbox to allow for freer airflow. I figure I will deal with this by connecting the stage 2 solenoid to the intake runner to engage short or long length, and simply disconnect the connector for the second vacuum pod or plug the vacuum line that it enables.
    Earlier in this forum PeeQuu illustrated the differences between the two manifolds, and mentioned THIS thread:
    PhotoAug3024227PM
    PhotoAug3024211PM

    Since I put a lot of work into creating a swirl flap bushing prototype for the ART (and AWN, I think should use the same manifold), I'll provide a link here to the cad drawing for anyone who would want to go this route. I hope someone finds a way to mass produce these things!
    swirl_flap_front_bushing
    https://www.tinkercad.com/things/5Z2...-front-bushing

    So, when I was ready to install the intake from the D3 A8, I decided to also replace my intake manifold gaskets. They were looking a bit aged, and didn't cost much.
    DSC_2769
    DSC_2770
    DSC_2793
    Part #077129717Q. I got my set from Columbus Import Auto of Columbus Indiana for $18. Got to give a shoutout to how helpful CIA has been!
    Each gasket is the same, just orientation is flipped around between the two of them. So don't worry about which gasket is supposed to go on which head!

    Before I installed the manifold and new gaskets I decided to clean this mess up as best as possible:
    DSC_2772
    DSC_2774

    Not much I can do about the carbon deposit schmutz in the intake heads' ports though. When I get it running I can run some seafoam through the intake and that might take care of most of it. I plan on installing an oil-catch-can later to remedy this in the future. More on that later though.
    DSC_2792
    DSC_2773

    This is how bad it got on the old intake manifold I'm no longer using:
    DSC_2776

    When I tried fitting the manifold on the heads I found I couldn't push it all the way back. Something was in the way. After a bit of inspection I found the breather tube for the PCV system was getting in the way. The D3's intake I was installing is shaped a bit different, which requires a different sweep on the breather tube.
    Here's the offending breather pipe, the metal one on the right:
    DSC_2862
    DSC_2860

    I had to order the correct breather tube (PN#077103215C -ebay, $21) that is made to fit around this intake. Here it is installed, with the old original one held next to it. You can see that the breather pipe made for the D3 intake begins its bend much lower:
    DSC_2864
    DSC_2865

    Once the correct breather tube was installed and all surfaces properly cleaned the manifold set right into place.
    Torquing down the manifold bolts is described in TSB 2010064/3:
    Intake Manifold Bolt Torque
    I will have to check torque again once I have it running and get the engine warm.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

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