Audizine - An Automotive Enthusiast Community

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 201 to 212 of 212
  1. #201
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Fuel Rail and Injectors Reinstall

    Guest-only advertisement. Register or Log In now!
    Before installing the fuel injectors and fuel rail I decided to soak the injectors in cleaning solution and replace the o-rings on each injector, and replace all the broken pintle caps with good ones. The o-rings were starting to crack and rot, and some of the pintle caps -which hold the o-ring from being sucked into the manifold, were cracked. Luckily for me, the D3 intake came with some caps still in the ports of the manifold.
    DSC_2871
    DSC_2775
    DSC_2877
    DSC_2873

    I cleaned the fuel rail with the same solution, then fitted each injector to the fuel rail. While the fuel rail is not bolted in place, take this chance to install the injector clips. Don't forget about these as I did. It's much harder to install them when the rail is already installed to the manifold. These clips keep the injectors from being sucked out of the fuel rail into the manifold. They wouldn't get sucked completely in, but it may create a leak on the top of the injector, spraying fuel into the engine bay. Bad medicine.
    Injector Clips

    Before I reinstalled the fuel lines to the fuel rail I decided it best to go ahead and drain the tank of all the old gas as much as possible. It's been a year and a half since I parked it and I'm sure the fuel is no longer good quality gasoline. I did this the same way I drained the remaining fuel from the A6 to use in the lawn mower: connect a battery to the fuel pump and wait at the other end to catch the fuel coming out of the fuel line:
    Red:Pump Positive
    Green: Pump Negative
    DSC_2886
    DSC_2883
    DSC_2881
    DSC_2882

    This took quite a while though. I pumped nearly 9.5 gallons out of the tank. I had to stop each time the gallon jug was full to pour that into the lawn mower, the extra 5gal gas tank, and all I could fit into the truck. But I eventually got all the gas out of the tank. Took me about an hour of this process.

    *Edit 6/26/2017:
    Please do exercise extreme caution here. Think what might happen if you connected battery + and - to the resistive float sensor instead of the pump? A little equation: Powerful battery + small shorted resistor = sparkler. In your gas tank. Please don't blow yourself up. Double check wiring diagrams on your own to verify this before making any connection, and when a connection is made, do it ever so briefly to make sure you hear the pump start to run instead of a pop, or similar scary sound. It's said that it should be hard to get a gas tank to ignite because it is more of the fumes that catch fire and not the liquid.. but what if the tank is nearly empty, on a warmer day? That's a tank with a lot of fumes. Please be careful here if you wish to try this on your own!

    Intake manifold, injectors, fuel rail, and fuel lines installed.
    DSC_3062
    DSC_3061
    Last edited by 4Loops; Today at 05:34 AM.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  2. #202
    Senior Member Two Rings
    Join Date
    Mar 29 2012
    AZ Member #
    90865
    My Garage
    1997 Audi A4 V6 Quattro
    Location
    Lynnwood, WA

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Loops View Post
    I like your selection of flexible hose used for the lower radiator outlet. Seems to have a better bend radius as well.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #203
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Quote Originally Posted by king84 View Post
    I like your selection of flexible hose used for the lower radiator outlet. Seems to have a better bend radius as well.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Seems to work out well. It's a Gates 25484 flexible hose. It has a spiral stainless wire spanning the inside to help the hose keep its shape. Looks like a stretched out spring yanked into a radiator hose. I think I may have purchased the wrong size though. The 1.5" x 2' hose I bought seems not quite tight enough on the engine side. For the radiator side I had to use a radiator hose adapter, 1.5" to 1.25" coupling, and that makes me worry enough. I may have to replace the entire flexible hose with an appropriately sized one, rather than use two coupling adapters on each side. Too much to go wrong, ya know?
    I'm catching up on my documentation for what I've already done, so heavy details to come on this soon. My radiator is finished and installed; I'm working now on fitment and fitting fans to it. Sneak preview of a long post to come: a 9" puller fan does work on the driver side of the engine where the serpentine belt does a "V". I have less than a centimeter between the fan motor backside and the front of the timing belt cover! Good thing those Stern mounts are stiff!
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  4. #204
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 25 2009
    AZ Member #
    37870
    Location
    Oceanside, NY

    How did you manege to get those plastic caps on and off the injectors to change the seals? When I took my rail/injectors out to change the upper half of the intake one of the plastic rings came off and it too me an hour to press it back on
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  5. #205
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Quote Originally Posted by pee quu View Post
    How did you manege to get those plastic caps on and off the injectors to change the seals? When I took my rail/injectors out to change the upper half of the intake one of the plastic rings came off and it too me an hour to press it back on
    Getting them off wasn't so bad, as most of them were cracked and they peeled right off. The couple that were still good I decided to replace with the better looking ones that came with the new manifold. Getting those off wasn't too bad -I used a small screw driver and used it to pull up on the cap as I spun the injector around -kind of the same motion of peeling an apple or potato with a regular knife. Getting them back on -yea, that was the fun part. I simply pushed them on with my thumb, wobbling the pressure around the circumference of the injector head. And yea, this led to quite an indentation on my thumb as you might imagine. So I did one every ~10 minutes to give me some healing time haha. I suppose if one thought the plastic caps looked to be in good shape though, the o-rings could be stretched over them.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  6. #206
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    A quick tip on bleeding the clutch, which I had a friend help me out with over last weekend: Have the rear higher than the front of the car.
    We tried to get the clutch bled earlier in the year, and were at it for over an hour with no luck -because I had the front of the car ever so slightly higher than the rear. After no success that time, I found a post by jaybquick@JHM in THIS thread that gives this very helpful tip:

    IMPORTANT TIP New as of 5-11-09
    We have found that if you try to bleed the clutch with the car NOT completely level. Like if you just jack up the front. You will almost NEVER be able to bleed it completely or will make it take forever. This traps air bubbles in one of the upper corners. So make sure the rear of your car is level with the front of your car and if not level even a little higher than the front. The key is to not have the front higher than the rear. We have always bled ours when the cars were level and routinely do it in 5 minutes or so. Well recently I was lazy and tried to do one with just the front of the car up and I couldn't get it to bleed for me no matter what I did. I thought about it and it hit me why. So I jacked the back of the car up and BOOM, it bleed quickly. Hope this new tip helps some that are struggling.
    Yep. Five minute job when the car is sitting properly. Amazing how much time a little research saves
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  7. #207
    Established Member Four Rings b7_Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 18 2015
    AZ Member #
    343342
    Location
    Denver, CO

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Loops View Post
    Yep. Five minute job when the car is sitting properly. Amazing how much time a little research saves
    Hey man, first off good job with documenting all this stuff with so much detail. I know it's tough to be busy with the car all the time and then also spend hours documenting all of it and keeping your thread updated. This will be super helpful for anyone looking to do this swap.
    I've done a lot of slave cylinder bleeds in the past and they've all worked fine, but this time I can't get my clutch to work. What did your clutch pedal feel like before? I always have my car level, but I've never tried it with the rear higher... maybe I need to do that.

  8. #208
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    I think I have my clutch feel about the same as before I embarked on this voyage. I say think because I usually can't remember what I had for breakfast let alone clutch feel from a year and a half ago, lol! But that said, I think it is back to normal in that the clutch will depress maybe less than a half of an inch (due to mechanical linkage slop from the pedal to the clutch piston), with the only resistance being the clutch spring holding it back, then I instantly feel pressure (liquid pressure) -not spongy air pressure. It now feels consistent throughout its travel. Before I had all the air out, I would feel the less than 1/2 inch of spring from the mechanical slop, then feel the clutch piston engaging, then an easy push that seemed to hit a "soft wall" of harder pressure (fluid). As to the level of the car our first go around at it.. the front of the car was only very slightly higher than the rear, and I couldn't get it all the way bled. I would say yea, to remove all doubt I'd raise the back a good bit taller than the front. Another thing we did was not pump the begesis out of the clutch while bleeding -as to not aerate the fluid. Instead I had a friend push the clutch in while I opened the bleeder valve, close the valve, and he raised the pedal. We repeated that 9 or 10 times before the pedal felt hard.
    At least it is possible to raise the rear to allow air bubbles to escape on these cars. My old S10 was stupid. The clutch master cylinder was pointed up at a 45* angle, with the line output at the bottom. I had no other choice than to keep pumping it while I drove it for a few days as it got better. That, or find a way to hang the truck from its front bumper while the clutch was bled!
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  9. #209
    Established Member Four Rings b7_Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 18 2015
    AZ Member #
    343342
    Location
    Denver, CO

    Gotcha, the front of my car is about an inch higher than the back right now. I've spent hours bleeding the clutch and every time the pedal feels really soft until the last inch or so of the throw and it gets really hard. I don't think the slave missed the clutch fork because I can push the pedal all the way to the floor and it hasn't popped. The first time I installed the slave in the transmission when it was outside the car so I could see that it was seated on the clutch fork. The pedal felt like described above. Then I switched the hydraulic clutch system to the older B5 style (car is a B7), bled it and the pedal still felt the exact same. I used a power bleeder in addition to pedal bleeding so I guess I will have to try bleeding it with the rear up.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #210
    Established Member Two Rings 4Loops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 21 2013
    AZ Member #
    109977
    My Garage
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro, MK4 Jetta TDI
    Location
    South Central Indiana

    Man, I wish I could give you a hint or direction here. You seem to have covered all the things I would've thought of. Super unlikely: but you don't think it could be a leaky master or slave cylinder, do you? I wish there were a way to see the clutch fork being engaged by the slave cylinder piston. I dog on the Chevy, but at least it had a panel on the transmission bell housing that could be removed in order to see the piston pushing the clutch fork appropriately. Removing the engine for a "quick" inspection is not a great solution either. Hmm. When you do figure it out, let me know what the problem/solution was.
    1999.5 A4 B5 2.8 Quattro (My V8 Swap Project)
    2002 Jetta TDI ALH
    2000 C5 A6 Partout (<--click here for link)
    2007 Silverado

  11. #211
    Senior Member Three Rings pee quu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 25 2009
    AZ Member #
    37870
    Location
    Oceanside, NY

    When I had my trans out to do the rear main seal I put in a metal slave. With that my buddy and I ran a steel braded hose from the slave up into the rain tray where the battery would be and mounted it up there with the bleeder valve. I had the clutch bled in % mins and the car was on the floor. One of my favorite mods lol
    2000 B5 A4 / C5 S6 V8 swap / B5 S4 driveline swap / PVW Nov 2016

  12. #212
    Established Member Four Rings b7_Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 18 2015
    AZ Member #
    343342
    Location
    Denver, CO

    Ya I'll see if I figure it out. The master isn't leaking, the first slave wasn't leaking, and the brand new slave wasn't leaking. The only thing I could think of is the clutch fork is not where it's supposed to be, but I took pictures of everything so I know I installed all the parts correctly. And I've done this a few times on different Audi's which is why I'm really confused why it's not working this time. I think I'm going to pull the slave and see where the clutch fork is and if I can compress it by hand. Then try and bleed the slave, maybe I'll hang the back of the car from a rope and bleed it that way lol


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


    © 2001-2017 Audizine, Audizine.com, and Driverzines.com
    Audizine is an independently owned and operated automotive enthusiast community and news website.
    Audi and the Audi logo(s) are copyright/trademark Audi AG. Audizine is not endorsed by or affiliated with Audi AG.