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kristokes
04-13-2011, 06:28 AM
DIAGNOSIS OF A USED SPARK PLUG

Normal

Light grey or tan deposits and slight electrode erosion
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_normal.jpg


Carbon Fouling

Dry, soft black carbon on the insulator and electrodes
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_carbonfouling.jpg
Symptoms:

Poor starting
Misfiring
Faulty acceleration

Causes:

Faulty choke - over rich air/fuel mixture
Delayed ignition timing
Bad ignition leads
Plug heat range too cold



Pre-Ignition

A melted or burned center and/or ground electrode, blistered insulator and aluminum or other metallic deposits on the insulator
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_preignition.jpg
Symptoms:

Loss of power causing engine damage
Pre-ignition occurs when combustion begins before the timed spark occurs

Causes:

Plug insufficiently tightened
Engine insufficiently cooled
Ignition timing too advanced
Plug heat range too hot



Over Heating

An extremely white insulator with small black deposits and premature electrode erosion
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_overheating.jpg
Symptoms:

Loss of power at high-speed or during heavy load

Causes:

Plug insufficiently tightened
Engine insufficiently cooled
Ignition timing too advanced
Plug heat range too hot



Mechanical Damage

Bent electrode and a broken insulator, dents often present on electrode
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_mechanicaldamage.jpg
Symptoms:

Misfiring

Causes:

Plug nose is too long for engine head
Foreign object (bolt/nut) in combustion chamber



Oil Fouling

Wet, oily black deposits on the insulator and electrodes
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_oilfouling.jpg
Symptoms:

Poor starting
Misfiring

Causes:

Wrong piston rings, cylinders, and valve guides
Fuel mixture oil content too high



Broken Insulator

Insulator is cracked or split
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_brokeninsulator.jpg
Symptoms:

Misfiring

Causes:

Severe detonation
Incorrect tool/torque applied during installation or removal
Careless gap setting



Torched Seat

Melted in the thread and seat area of the plug housing
http://www.densoiridium.com/graphics/dia_torchedseat.jpg
Symptoms:

Loss of power causing engine damage

Causes:

Plug insufficiently tightened



WHICH SPARK PLUG IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Auto makers built their cars to be maintenence-free, and no prudent consumer in their right mind would buy a car with plugs that you have to change every 3000-5000 miles these days (unless it was a hand-me-down used car). Most modern day vehicles will use iridium, while most are using platinums.

Platinum plugs (and Iridiums) were introduced to provide longevity (60k-100k+) to vehicles compared to copper plugs which foul after 3000-5000 miles, but they do NOT dissapate heat fast enough (which leads to pre-ignition/detonation) and do NOT provide a "better spark" like they have claimed...with their "fine-wire electrode" (which only causes problems).

Copper is one of the best conductors of electricity and heat, but they just plain dont last. Using Platinum and Iridium plugs, the center electrode (fine-wire) thin, that under high boost, they get so hot, they will begin to "heat glow" and cause premature ignition in the combustion cycle (pre-ignition => detonation) unless they were properly designed to pull the heat. This is a problem for all of us turbo guys running high boost. Copper on the other hand, has a much thicker center electrode, on top of that, the copper material is able to dissapate heat from the combustion chamber fast enough to keep the combustion temperatures lower. Coppers use thicker electrodes simply based on the fact that they can easily jump the spark, whereas platinum and iridiums will require a fine wire to better direct the spark to prevent missfires.

Remember the two primary functions of a spark plug:

1) To efficiently ignite the A/F mixture without mis-fires (Gap, etc)
2) To pull heat from the combustion chamber into the head, where the cooling system should dissapate that heat. (Heat Range)

With those two in mind, coppers will work much better in these environments. For those thinking: "What If I just simple use a colder Platinum plug?" Well, for the kind of boost our A4's make with the Krispy-Kreme K03's, we will reach EGT's of over 900 degrees C (keeping in mind that pre-ignition can start to occur at around 870 degrees C). Once those colder platinums reach preignition temperature, it will take them FOREVER to dissapate that amount of heat (with the details about the material/design I mentioned above). A platinum/Iridium plug in a colder heat range usually runs just as hot as a copper in the standard heat range when under high stress. So many people will use a Platinum/Iridum plug TWO steps colder to counter that. But using a plug that is 2 steps colder, will lead to two things:

1) More prone to carbon-fouling on "normal driving" where EGT's are kept low. (Plugs must stay above 550C Deg to burn off excess carbon deposits to "self-clean")
2) As a result, loss of horsepower from a less efficient/inhibited spark.

You need a plug that is actually "hot enough" to ignite the A/F mixture as hot as possible to get the most efficient combustion, as well as burn off carbon-deposits (~550C deg), and yet cold enough to prevent pre-ignition when compression is high (< 870C Deg).
http://i.imgur.com/E5JuUyv.png

Quick cross-reference guide for all the plugs listed above in heat range:
(VW/Audi Factory heat range in bold)

NGK - | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 |
Denso - | 18 | 20 | 22 | 24 | 27 |
Bosch - | 8 | 7 | 6 | 5 | 4 |
Champion - | 11,12 | 9,10 | 7,8 | 61,63 | 59 |

OEM Range - Stock car with stock boost/timing, or mildly-tuned car in cold climates.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:

NGK FR7S8EG (OE Platinum)
Bosch FR6KPP332S (OE Platinum)
Bosch F6DTC (Tri-Electrode)
NGK BKR7E (Copper)
NGK BKR7EIX (Iridium version of the same plug above)
Denso K22R (Copper)
Denso IK22 (Iridium version of the same plug above)

One Step Colder - Cars with basic performance upgrade (chip/intake/exhaust) - k03, k04, etc.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:

NGK BKR8E (Copper)
NGK BKR8EIX (Iridium Version of the same plug above)
NGK R5672A-8 (Copper, Non-Resistor plug)
Denso K24R (Copper)
Denso IK24 (Iridium Version of the same plug above)
Bosch FR5DTC (Tri-Electrode)
Bosch F5DP0R (Platinum/Side Fire)**

Two Steps Colder - Cars with bigger turbos will benefit from these, whereas a regularly chipped car may foul these.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:

Champion C59YC (Copper)
NGK BKR9EIX (Iridium)
Denso IK27 (Iridium)

** - Many members have found real good luck with the Bosch F5DPOR's, this is why:

Despite all the "con's" about platinums (poor conductivity, poor heat dissapation qualities), the engineers at Bosch has managed to engineer the F5DPOR's so that they are still able to fire the A/F as well as pull away enough heat. The F5DPOR's unlike conventional plugs, use a "Side-Fire" technology, where instead of a standard "projected" electrode into the combustion chamber, the ground electrode was placed on the edge of the plug so that it fires closer to the flame kernel. By doing so, the F5DPOR's are able to still keep a thick center electrode (to pull heat away faster) without having to go with a smaller electrode in order to fire. The F5DPOR's heat range is also equavalent to that of a NGK #8 (TWO steps colder than stock), in order to give the same effect as a #7. But because it is a platinum plug and not copper, they will not foul "as" easily where a copper would have. Because of these two important attributes, Bosch was able to use these plugs to both last like other platinums (up to 60k), while still function under more extreme environments. Platinums however, still do not compare to iridiums in longevity, as well as heat/electro conductivity.

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS SECTION


Question:
How cheap are the copper plugs? Can you actually feel a difference in performance?
Answer:
I got mine for $3 each so $12 for a set of 4.. For that price, it's worth trying them out yourself [up]
Question:
Also, do you recommend a .028 gap on the coppers?
Answer:
I gapped the plugs from it's specs (0.028") to 0.032" (do not go over). The minute I fired up the car, the exhaust tone became a LOT deeper. So I took the car around the block, then on the highway doing some 0-100MPH pulls - the car became a LOT smoother! The powerband of the turbo will now make boost past 5000RPM and the spool-up became noticeably quicker. The hesitation I used to experience at 5000RPM disappeared and the idle became a lot smoother.

By simply switching spark plugs, I would say that my "butt-dyno" pretty much felt another 5-10hp difference in power. [up]
Question:
Stock gap is .028 right? .032 is recommended for tuned cars. Or is the opposite true?
Answer:
Well it depends on what you mean by stock but coming straight from the factory, our OEM spark plugs are actually UNDER-GAPPED at 0.027". Since OEM spark plugs were made for longevity (~50k+ miles), they were set at a lower gap because the gap will eventually get bigger through time and wear on the electrodes.

IMHO from personal experience, I believe a 0.032" gap is optimal for our cars.

Since I currently use NGK spark plugs on my B7A4 and quite familiar with them, let's go over what to look for and what to set the gaps at when using NGK as an example (the same concept can be applied to other brand spark plugs)

This is how NGK's numbering system typically works:
Most NGK spark plugs you find at your local auto parts store end with a (-xx) after the part number; which signifies a pre-gap.

For example, if you got a set of BKR7E-11's (although those are very hard to find), the -11 denotes a 1.1mm or 0.044" pre-gap. A BKR7E-8 would be a 0.8mm or 0.032" pre-gap, and so forth.. However, part numbers that do NOT have a (-xx) such as BKR7E will indicate the default gap of 0.0315" (basically a 0.032"). So do NOT get that confused.

Many people who use the BKR6E's often buy the BKR6E-11's instead since it's OEM recommended for many vehicles, which comes with a HUGE gap of 1.1mm or 0.044". In order for it to work properly with the gap you want (0.032"), you need to bang the crap out of the ground strap just to make 0.032". But by then, the strap is already crooked and bent. This will lead to more mis-fires and pre-mature wear. You typically want a spark plug that's pre-gapped as close as possible to your desired gap - best way to keep the center and ground electrodes parallel.

A general rule of thumb:
Always stay within a +/- 0.008" gap range when re-gapping. Basically, a 0.032" plug should be gapped no less than 0.024" and no more than 0.040". (This applies to most plugs using a single ground electrode strap. Multi-electrode straps are a different beast that I'm sadly not familiar with.)

Leo14
04-13-2011, 07:02 AM
[up] thanks Stokes, yet again another great write up man keep em comin!

Apollo
04-13-2011, 07:52 AM
Great stuff here. Thanks for taking the time to put it together for us!

beantown
04-13-2011, 07:58 AM
Thanks for the write-up; great stuff as usual.

wootwoot
04-13-2011, 08:51 AM
Great info. Does anyone here actually use copper plugs? It seems like a lot of work changing your plugs every oil change.

kristokes
04-13-2011, 09:20 AM
I use copper plugs (NGK BKR7E) and change them every oil change.

jimrobbington
04-13-2011, 09:29 AM
How cheap are the copper plugs? Can you actually feel a difference in performance?

kristokes
04-13-2011, 09:38 AM
I got mine for $3 each so $12 for a set of 4.. For that price, it's worth trying them out yourself [up]

jimrobbington
04-13-2011, 09:44 AM
Also, do you recommend a .028 gap on the coppers?

mr shickadance
04-13-2011, 09:52 AM
nice write up, i plan on doing a nice little service to my car next oil change

plugs, gear oil, complete sea foam, oil change, and maybe control arm switch

b6onboost
04-13-2011, 09:54 AM
Just a note on choosing between a copper and irridium plug. The coppers are 3-4 times cheaper, but the irridiums will last 5-6 times longer...so even though coppers are cheaper to buy, the irridiums are the better value overall. I have ran both the plugs below and did not notice a difference in performance, smoothness, idling, ect. Got about 5k out of the coppers, 30k out of the irridiums.

NGK BKR7E (Copper)
NGK BKR7EIX (Iridium Version of the same plug above)

PNB7
04-13-2011, 10:59 AM
I ran the NGK BKR6Es in my VR6 on low boost and fouled them allll the time which wasnt surprising. I have the BKR8Es now and they have been awesome. Probably need to change them every couple of months but it takes all of five minutes so no big deal.

Jay-Bee
04-13-2011, 11:41 AM
Also, do you recommend a .028 gap on the coppers?

That's what I went with on the BKR6E plugs I swapped in. The plugs I pulled out were OEM, probably in there since it was built 92K kms ago! Gap was well over 0.035 and they had hard white deposits on them.

Made a very noticeable difference obviously.

Doctor
04-13-2011, 11:51 AM
Great write-up.

Bosch F5DP0R for me. Really happy with those.

This thread should be sticky

Gil2.0T
04-13-2011, 12:00 PM
Im going to change mine. I bought the car with 48 and it has 57 now. Who knows when the last time they were changed is.

vhstejskal
04-13-2011, 12:07 PM
This thread should be sticky

^2

kristokes
04-13-2011, 06:08 PM
Also, do you recommend a .028 gap on the coppers?

I gapped the plugs from it's specs (0.028") to 0.032" (do not go over). The minute I fired up the car, the exhaust tone became a LOT deeper. So I took the car around the block, then on the highway doing some 0-100MPH pulls - the car became a LOT smoother! The powerband of the turbo will now make boost past 5000RPM and the spool-up became noticeably quicker. The hesitation I used to experience at 5000RPM disappeared and the idle became a lot smoother.

By simply switching spark plugs, I would say that my "butt-dyno" pretty much felt another 5-10hp difference in power. [up]

makav3li
04-13-2011, 06:34 PM
impressive, very informative i wont lie

ajax2112
04-13-2011, 06:39 PM
Just posting so that I can refer back to this in the future. Thanks for all of the info.

yayjohnny
04-13-2011, 06:47 PM
Awesome write up, should throw these into the Tech section or else they eventually die off and only to be found via search function :(

matthewb2795
04-13-2011, 07:59 PM
Great write-up! Maybe include something about gapping.


I gapped the plugs from it's specs (0.028") to 0.032" (do not go over)

Stock gap is .028 right? .032 is recommended for tuned cars. Or is the opposite true?

kristokes
04-14-2011, 05:14 AM
Stock gap is .028 right? .032 is recommended for tuned cars. Or is the opposite true?

Well it depends on what you mean by stock but coming straight from the factory, our OEM spark plugs are actually UNDER-GAPPED at 0.027". Since OEM spark plugs were made for longevity (~50k+ miles), they were set at a lower gap because the gap will eventually get bigger through time and wear on the electrodes.

IMHO from personal experience, I believe a 0.032" gap is optimal for our cars.

Since I currently use NGK spark plugs on my B7A4 and quite familiar with them, let's go over what to look for and what to set the gaps at when using NGK as an example (the same concept can be applied to other brand spark plugs)

This is how NGK's numbering system typically works:
Most NGK spark plugs you find at your local auto parts store end with a (-xx) after the part number; which signifies a pre-gap.

For example, if you got a set of BKR7E-11's (although those are very hard to find), the -11 denotes a 1.1mm or 0.044" pre-gap. A BKR7E-8 would be a 0.8mm or 0.032" pre-gap, and so forth.. However, part numbers that do NOT have a (-xx) such as BKR7E will indicate the default gap of 0.0315" (basically a 0.032"). So do NOT get that confused.

Many people who use the BKR6E's often buy the BKR6E-11's instead since it's OEM recommended for many vehicles, which comes with a HUGE gap of 1.1mm or 0.044". In order for it to work properly with the gap you want (0.032"), you need to bang the crap out of the ground strap just to make 0.032". But by then, the strap is already crooked and bent. This will lead to more mis-fires and pre-mature wear. You typically want a spark plug that's pre-gapped as close as possible to your desired gap - best way to keep the center and ground electrodes parallel.

A general rule of thumb:
Always stay within a +/- 0.008" gap range when re-gapping. Basically, a 0.032" plug should be gapped no less than 0.024" and no more than 0.040". (This applies to most plugs using a single ground electrode strap. Multi-electrode straps are a different beast that I'm sadly not familiar with.)

matthewb2795
04-14-2011, 06:08 AM
Great, thanks for the info!

I put in Bosch 101905631H at the end of the summer. They were pre-gapped to .028. I think I will gap them to .032 this weekend.

Dangler
04-14-2011, 10:15 AM
Dear Mr. Stokes

I currently have just a carboner intake, exhaust, and GAIC Chip.

I want to run the NGK Coppers, Currently i have the iridiums, and dont mind changing them more often.

what is the exact NGK's you use. or better yet, what would you say works best for my setup.

I also plan on doing rai's test pipe and downpipe. and may one day use my 100oct file that i have, but never have used.

From you're favorite 1/2 Pinoy.

Dangler.

mr shickadance
04-14-2011, 10:39 AM
i vote this, b7 kevin's gear oil change diy, and my post about information about wheels to be moved into the b7 tech section

kristokes
04-14-2011, 05:32 PM
Dear Mr. Stokes

I currently have just a carboner intake, exhaust, and GAIC Chip.

I want to run the NGK Coppers, Currently i have the iridiums, and dont mind changing them more often.

what is the exact NGK's you use. or better yet, what would you say works best for my setup.

I also plan on doing rai's test pipe and downpipe. and may one day use my 100oct file that i have, but never have used.

From you're favorite 1/2 Pinoy.

Dangler.

NGK BKR7E (copper) gapped to 0.032" - I use the exact same spark plugs on my set-up and change them every oil change (3-5k miles).

g60_corrado_91
04-14-2011, 05:38 PM
I wish I had seen this thread before posting in the other one. One more question for you kristokes. What plugs did you have before the BKR7E's? Or maybe to better rephrase it, did you ever have the BKR7IE's and then make the switch to the BKR7E's?

Mc Suly
04-14-2011, 08:16 PM
NICEEEEE JOB!

kristokes
04-16-2011, 02:19 AM
I wish I had seen this thread before posting in the other one. One more question for you kristokes. What plugs did you have before the BKR7E's? Or maybe to better rephrase it, did you ever have the BKR7IE's and then make the switch to the BKR7E's?

Prior to using NGK BKR7E (copper), I used the factory Bosch spark plugs until my first oil change at approx. 5k miles. Since then, I've been using BKR7E and replacing them every oil change..

eastwick897
04-16-2011, 06:34 PM
Excellent write up! The B7 forum can use more of these technical posts.

g60_corrado_91
04-18-2011, 03:51 PM
Prior to using NGK BKR7E (copper), I used the factory Bosch spark plugs until my first oil change at approx. 5k miles. Since then, I've been using BKR7E and replacing them every oil change..


Cool, thanks for the info. I actually installed the BKR7E's on Saturday. The engine seems to run a little smoother, but that may be because they're brand new as well. Still, once in awhile, my old NGK BKR7EIX's would cause the engine to misfire for 5 seconds on a cold start. They were all gapped at .032" so I don't know why they were doing that. My original set of BKR7EIX's never caused misfires like that until they had 40k on them. Then at wide open throttle at about 2500rpm (full boost), I'd get one misfire. It was due to the buildup on the plugs though.

Here are some pictures.

http://i589.photobucket.com/albums/ss337/g60corrado91/photo1.jpg
http://i589.photobucket.com/albums/ss337/g60corrado91/photo3.jpg

boy blue11
04-28-2011, 04:29 AM
I have a 2006 audi a4 non s line with 54k miles. I decided to change the spark plugs and put in the new Pulstar Iridium Series. After I installed them I started the car and it sounded a bit weird like a little knocking sound and I figured the engine is adjusting to the new supposed bigger spark. So I put it in drive and went down the street all of a sudden the car started to jerk and shutter and the check engine light came on. So I went back and checked all of the plugs and they looked fine and the coils were switched and it still did the same thing. Long story short I put back in the stock plugs and car works like a gem. Any comments or suggestions? I was thinking maybe they weren't spaced correctly but they came straight from pulstar.

kristokes
04-28-2011, 04:46 AM
^ It sounds like your new spark plugs are incorrectly gapped. Purchase a spark plug gapper from your local auto parts store and check the gap on your Pulstar spark plugs.

Spark plug gapper:
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT1SuwWXsPFb9nM59j2cPBUdq7uBIr-OzbEBeMj_pRcEeoScGbX

mr shickadance
04-28-2011, 07:05 AM
just an fyi anyone planning on running these plugs
NGK BKR7EIX (Iridium Version of the same plug above)

factory gaps them at .030

ajax2112
04-28-2011, 04:57 PM
Every thing in this thread made sense to me until I read this thread.
http://www.golfmk5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135855

Help me I'm confused

Matt@EuropaParts
04-29-2011, 09:40 AM
I know I have a 1.8T, but I swear by the Bosch F5DPOR's. I won't use anything else

g60_corrado_91
05-15-2011, 08:17 PM
Every thing in this thread made sense to me until I read this thread.
http://www.golfmk5.com/forums/showthread.php?t=135855

Help me I'm confused

I've had both the stock plugs, the iridium one step colder NGK's, and now the copper one step colder NGK's. I did notice a slightly better idle with the NGK iridium's and coppers over the stock plugs, but otherwise, the performance was about the same. I'm on that forum A LOT (over 15k posts) and I've seen people say similar things. Some of my buddies stick with the factory plugs even on K04'd 2.0T's. Either way, IMO it's not a huge difference with the slightly colder plugs, but it's not hurting anything so I stick with them. FWIW, I used them in -15 degree weather with no problems starting or anything.

br8ker21
05-16-2011, 11:07 AM
Awesome tech write! Now time to replace my plugs!

Operator
05-21-2011, 01:15 PM
Changed mine out, a couple days ago. Since then all sorts of strange happenings................. Car doesn't want to start up each time, sometimes one turn others 3-4. Exhaust is smelling pretty foul, and intermittently I'm getting smoke from the exhaust yesterday it was a thick cloud of white smoke, today not as thick, but still smoke present. A simple drive around the block has the car studdering, and possibly going into limp mod (not sure about limp mode as I don't truly know all that goes into it) Before, I changed the plugs to the 7E's I had a few misfire codes. I attributed them to my plugs since the dealership changed out all 4 coils packs last year. Anyone experience coil packs going bad after just over a year? Pretty sure they are gapped right. Any thoughts?

I plan on dropping it off with my tuner, but any info is welcome.

vdubjetta02
05-21-2011, 01:38 PM
I am putting one step colder NGK in my car next week.... Hope it helps my start up problems

I ran seafoam through my gas tank about 2 fill ups ago, so that might have had an affect on my stock plugs

br8ker21
05-21-2011, 09:00 PM
Just picked up some NGK BKR7EIX's. Hoping to put them on sometime tomorrow. If I run into any issues I'll let you guys know. When I checked I think the gap is close to 0.030"

martin0079
05-22-2011, 05:43 AM
Just picked up some NGK BKR7EIX's. Hoping to put them on sometime tomorrow. If I run into any issues I'll let you guys know. When I checked I think the gap is close to 0.030"

dont forget di-electric grease

br8ker21
05-23-2011, 08:07 PM
So finally got the time to change my plugs...before it started to rain :)
My thoughts is the new plugs did help with a quick and smooth acceleration.[:)]

Let's see here's 1 of the three that looked like this. (see below)



http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac124/lbn2183/2011-05-23184211.jpg

And the last SP that looked like this. It was kinda oily...[confused]


http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac124/lbn2183/2011-05-23185201.jpg


After a few minutes of struggling to remove the tab, I found out do this works alot better...at least for me :) (see below)

http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac124/lbn2183/2011-05-23181246.jpg

mr shickadance
05-23-2011, 08:28 PM
^^^people.... PUSH IN.....then pull out take a lesson from sex, the screwdriver will sometimes break off the tabs and it sucks....but if you push in then with your finger push down on the tab while pulling out it will slide right out


......omg what did i just say?

rings65
07-20-2011, 06:04 AM
Just to clarify - according to the NGK website (ngksparkplugs.com) they recommend the PFR7S8EG Laser Platinum plug as a direct replacement in the 2.0T. If you look at their part number fact sheet (http://ngksparkplugs.com/docs/tech/partnumberkey.pdf) the '7' indicates the heat rating number, so I'm assuming that would mean that their BKR7EIX plug mentioned in the first post is also now in the recommended heat range?

Would seem to be backed up a little bit by an article that I found on the GTI forums (http://changegears.wordpress.com/2011/02/25/new-oem-spark-plugs-06h-905-601-a-ngk-pfr7s8eg/) - take it for what it's worth I guess... EDIT: Just noticed that ECS also lists the BKR7EIX plug as a replacement for our cars....

A4-Wookie
07-21-2011, 09:02 AM
[QUOTE=This thread should be sticky[/QUOTE]

Bump up... To the sticky!

Gil2.0T
07-27-2011, 02:51 PM
Looks like ill be switching to NGK BKR7EIX when i get tuned to Revo stg 2.

Gil2.0T
07-27-2011, 02:53 PM
Anyone have a good place they ordered theirs from?

viziers
07-27-2011, 03:32 PM
Go with the bosch ones that are on Vasts site they are side fireing and seem to work better than those. At least in my car they are.



vizi

Gil2.0T
07-28-2011, 08:43 AM
Go with the bosch ones that are on Vasts site they are side fireing and seem to work better than those. At least in my car they are.



vizi

Are they one step colder than OEM?

kristokes
07-28-2011, 12:22 PM
Are they one step colder than OEM?

Two steps colder than OEM - great for his big turbo application.

bmc333
07-29-2011, 06:47 AM
Two steps colder than OEM - great for his big turbo application.

According to the Vast site, they are only 1 step colder: https://vastperformance.com/index.php/products/audi/audi-b7-a4-2005-5-2008/maintenance/bosch-side-fire-spark-plugs-1-8t-2-7t.html - are they wrong in stating that?

I went ahead and ordered them - looks like for my turbo set up I'll be happy with them.

Gil2.0T
07-29-2011, 10:45 AM
I dont need bif turbo spark plugs. I think he was saying the Bosch are one step colder, comparable to the NGK i was looking at.

two.0
07-30-2011, 03:01 PM
I just purchased a set of NGK BKR7EIX-11 and after reading this im not sure if it will work with my car, they are gaped at .40 I believe. Should I exchange these out, (bought from amazon) or can I make them work?

kristokes
08-01-2011, 04:18 AM
I just purchased a set of NGK BKR7EIX-11 and after reading this im not sure if it will work with my car, they are gaped at .40 I believe. Should I exchange these out, (bought from amazon) or can I make them work?

If possible, exchange them for NGK BKR7E-8.

kristokes
08-01-2011, 04:21 AM
Moved to the B7A4 Tech section.

Hugh@EuropaParts
08-01-2011, 09:13 AM
Great write up Stokes! We have most if not all of these in stock! click here (http://www.europaparts.com/)

Cherub
08-26-2011, 01:55 PM
Any truth to these Ignition Coil packs being better at withstanding more heat than the OEMs that currently on our vehicles?

http://www.europaparts.com/ignition-coil-pack-06e905115e.html

Thanks

audi8844
08-26-2011, 02:15 PM
Any truth to these Ignition Coil packs being better at withstanding more heat than the OEMs that currently on our vehicles?

http://www.europaparts.com/ignition-coil-pack-06e905115e.html

Thanks

x2

p1nk50ck
09-30-2011, 12:21 PM
NGK BKR7E in stock at amazon.com for 1.99 each.

if you have amazon prime, it's free 2 day shipping :)

jimrobbington
10-08-2011, 11:27 AM
I upgraded to the BKR7Es a couple days ago. Much smoother engine response between shifts, and much smoother rev matching down shifts.

royal_b7a4
11-12-2011, 11:37 PM
Just installed some NGK BKR7E copper plugs and I must say they are soooooo much better. Had my old plugs in for 44k miles..these new plugs are great. Car rides smooth starts up fast pulls harder an even holds more boost on shifts..highly recommend these plugs

968Reckless
12-25-2011, 02:25 PM
2008 with milltek and APR looking at these NGK BKR7E copper plugs....any opinions? good choice?

royal_b7a4
12-25-2011, 03:05 PM
2008 with milltek and APR looking at these NGK BKR7E copper plugs....any opinions? good choice?
I use them they are very good. Holds boost very well. Peppier sounding engine. Just they have to be changed more regularly only downfall

Schweini
01-09-2013, 04:12 PM
Who else here is running the Bosch F5DPOR's?

I've been running them since stage 1, now currently on a stage 2 APR and have noticed a lot of carbon fouling on them. They're still performing well from what I can tell, but to be honest just not sure if I should keep them in. I paid a good penny for them, but now wondering if they are too cold of a plug to be using for only a Stage 2.

Any thoughts?

Jhad
01-09-2013, 05:13 PM
They could be too cold for you- 2 steps colder than stock.From the research I did on them, a lot of people using them had big turbos and or k04's. I actually just picked up a set of them to try out. Have you given the copper bkr7's a shot? Pita to change every oil change, but I had good results (haven't heard anything bad about them). They're cheap enough to just try em out.

Schweini
01-09-2013, 05:21 PM
They could be too cold for you- 2 steps colder than stock.From the research I did on them, a lot of people using them had big turbos and or k04's. I actually just picked up a set of them to try out. Have you given the copper bkr7's a shot? Pita to change every oil change, but I had good results (haven't heard anything bad about them). They're cheap enough to just try em out.

Yeah I'm thinking the same thing, the coppers are cheap enough to just give them a shot to see the difference.

I was curious mostly because of what I read, it was 50/50 them being a #8 and or #7 plug. When I first installed them a bit over a year ago on the stage 1, they were fabulous, noticed a huge difference from the start. Seems weird that they're fouling now especially being on Stage 2 which you'd think is a bit better. Wondering if the fouling was caused from some other reasons

I'll grab some bkr7's at some point though to try out

Jhad
01-09-2013, 05:26 PM
What I read is that they are an 8, but they get very hot and dissipate most of the heat making them act like a 7. How many miles did you get out of them?

What did the fouled plugs look like? Sometimes you can figure out the why.

Schweini
01-09-2013, 05:32 PM
hmm, I'm going to say I'm approx at 26,000 Km with the Bosch. The fouling looks exactly what Kristokes has posted in the first picture. Pure black dry dust covering the whole area, but the very tips of the plug are clean

any thoughts on that?

Jhad
01-09-2013, 05:47 PM
Hmm on my mkv, my plugs would get like that- I would also have some black smoke at wot. My tune was running rich, and a shop near me told me it was pretty common on these motors to do that.

Schweini
01-09-2013, 05:52 PM
Oh really? Okay well that's reassuring then. I honestly wouldn't have noticed the fouling if I didn't randomly check the plugs one day, they had no symptoms or anything of the matter giving me a reason to check in on them.

Thanks for the info Jhad

esm
04-27-2014, 05:35 PM
Just added copper plugs for the first time, NGK BKR7E. ECS Tuning lists these as one step colder than OEM, for tuned cars, which is why I bought them: http://www.ecstuning.com/Audi-B7_A4-Quattro-2.0T/Engine/Ignition/ES8924/.

Looking over this DIY guide, it looks that that is the wrong temperature rating for tuned cars? I'm confused. I hope I bought the right ones, since I wanted copper with one step colder than OEM.

Any thoughts appreciated. They came gapped at .032, so I am good there. I am stage 2 APR tuned.

Jake@JHM
04-27-2014, 07:18 PM
NGK 7 Bosch 6 are the stock heat ranges. Being stage 2 I would recommend going with a Bosch 5 or NGK 8.

Sent from my S5

esm
04-27-2014, 10:00 PM
NGK 7 Bosch 6 are the stock heat ranges. Being stage 2 I would recommend going with a Bosch 5 or NGK 8.

Sent from my S5

On ECS, they list NGK 6 as the stock heat range. http://www.ecstuning.com/Audi-B7_A4-Quattro-2.0T/Engine/Ignition/ES8923/ Is copper core rated a different number?

esm
04-27-2014, 10:03 PM
Europaparts lists the same thing, NGK BKR7E as the one step colder plug: http://www.europaparts.com/spark-plug-bkr7eix.html

What's the final answer here?

vwnobby
04-28-2014, 06:17 AM
I've been running NGK BKR7E copper since stage II (now stage II+). Car has been solid and surging issues I had earlier on seem to have been resolved with these plugs.

Sent from my SM-N900T using Tapatalk

Jake@JHM
04-28-2014, 11:29 AM
Those heat ranges would be correct if we were talking about a 1.8T. However, the 2.0T is a higher compression engine from the factory thus requiring colder plugs than the 1.8T.

Feel free to contact Audi and inquire what the stock heat range is for the 2.0T.

esm
04-29-2014, 07:21 AM
Those heat ranges would be correct if we were talking about a 1.8T. However, the 2.0T is a higher compression engine from the factory thus requiring colder plugs than the 1.8T.

Feel free to contact Audi and inquire what the stock heat range is for the 2.0T.

Jake, thanks for the feedback. The NGK 7s are in, and so far the car is running smooth--some of the surging is gone (not all, but an improvement until warm up), and the idle and acceleration feel smooth. I'll look for NGK 8s (couldn't find them the first time I shopped) and try them next oil change.