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View Full Version : DIY: 20 Steps To B7 Brakes



Asimko
12-08-2008, 02:45 PM
First I just want to say I am not an expert, but the following steps worked for me. I take no responsibility for any damages to your vehicle or parts within.


I have searched many forums looking for a DIY for the B7 body style but found nothing. To try and help others I decided to make one myself, so here you go.


Tools needed:
1. Vehicle Jack
2. Jack Stands
3. 17mm Socket
4. 14mm Socket
5. T55 Torx Socket
6. 21mm Socket
7. C-Clamp or Large Pliers
8. T27 Torx Socket
9. Rubber Mallet
10. Lithium Grease
11. Brake Clean
12. Air Tools (For Ease of Install)



Step One: Jack up the car and support it with jack stand(s).

Step Two: Remove the wheel(s) using a 17mm Socket.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0495.jpg

Step Three: Remove the 14mm bolt holding the Pad sensor bracket on the back of the caliper. This step is not necessary but I found it helps with maneuvering tools better.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/caliper3.jpg

Step Four: Remove (4) T55 bolts on the back of the caliper.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/caliper2.jpg

Step Five: Remove the front half of the caliper
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0505.jpg

Step Six: Tilt the brake pad spring forward using the two ends of the spring. Wiggle it back and forth while tilting it forward and it should pop out. Once it is off the pad should push out easily. Take this time and remove any excess brake dust from the front half of the caliper by using some brake clean and a rag.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Caliper4.jpg

Step Seven: Remove (2) 21mm bolts from the back of the caliper. This step will free the remaining caliper assembly from the vehicle so have a jack stand waiting to rest it on.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Caliper.jpg
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0507.jpg

Step Eight: Remove the T27 Torx screw that holds the rotor in place.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Rotor.jpg

Step Nine: Even with the screw removed the rotor most likely will not come off. Take a rubber mallet and hit the lower half until it breaks free. Do not hit it to hard, just slowly increase pressure until it breaks free.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0510.jpg

Step Ten: If you have air tools I suggest you use a whiz wheel on the rotor mounting surface to clear away any rust build up.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0511.jpg

Step Eleven: With either a C-Clamp or large pliers compress the caliper piston. I found leaving the old pad on until after this step makes it easier to compress the piston. Before you start to compress the piston open the hood and remove the cap to the brake fluid reservoir. Pack some old rags around the reservoir to catch any excess brake fluid.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Piston.jpg

Step Twelve: You can now remove the center section of the caliper. Pull forward and the brake pad should come with it (The pad sensor wire will still be connected, go to next step.). The piston will remain where it is until the pedal is depressed.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Caliper5.jpg

Step Thirteen: To remove the sensor wire, insert a thin screw driver into small hole on the bracket. Unplug the connector, then rotate it and pull up. Pay attention to where the wire tracks for when you have to run the new one.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Sensor.jpg

Step Fourteen: Take the center section and clean it off like you did with the front section. Once it is clean apply a little lithium grease to the two pistons.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/Grease.jpg

Step Fifteen: Take the new pad and plug it in while keeping in mind the way it was routed before. After your plugged in insert the center section and then snap the pad into place. (Sorry no pic)

Step Sixteen: Take the new rotors and a can of brake clean and proceed to clean the rotors. I used a very
mild piece of sandpaper because there was overspray from when the factory painted the center section of the rotor.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0516.jpg

Step Seventeen:After you mount the new rotors and tighten the T27 rotor screw, bolt the rear section of the caliper back on using the (2) 21mm bolts.
http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z277/asimko1/IMG_0505.jpg

Step Eighteen: Take the new pad and snap it into the front section of the caliper, making sure that the pad is positioned properly. Now remount the front half of the caliper to the rest and hand tighten the (4) T55 bolts.

Step Nineteen: Take the caliper spring and reinsert it onto the caliper. Make sure the tab on the spring reinserts into the brake pad clip. Make sure you tighten everything back together including the sensor bracket and then remount the wheel

Step Twenty: . All that is left is to close the brake reservoir and hood, pump the brakes to get pressure, and take her for a test drive.



This DIY is for the front brakes, but from what I understand the rears are the same except for the needing a caliper tool. When it comes time to do the rears I will add pics.

I hope everyone approves because like I said I'm no expert. Please let me know if I missed anything.

cstarky15
12-08-2008, 02:56 PM
holy crap. Nice write up

apatchin
12-08-2008, 03:05 PM
nice writeup. thanks.[race]

nimski62
12-08-2008, 03:12 PM
Thanks! mods should put this in the DIY sections for all the b6 cars and b7 cars.

jahciple
12-08-2008, 03:32 PM
Nioce write up. DYI Worthy!!!

bcramer
12-08-2008, 03:47 PM
Nice DIY.

Plus 1 rep for you.

Asimko
12-08-2008, 03:54 PM
Thanks for the comments and reps, I'm just glad to help.[:D]

Asimko
12-09-2008, 07:03 AM
Bump for DIY page

Who Needs 8
12-09-2008, 07:58 AM
I could have used this a couple months ago.

Asimko
12-09-2008, 02:36 PM
Sorry, necessity is the mother of invention and it wasn't necessary for me until now. Wish I could have helped you though.

Sanjman
01-04-2009, 02:49 PM
awesome DIY! but i was told that I have to bleed the brakes and while at it should flush the brake fluid... any thoughts on that?

DoThisMyWay
01-04-2009, 03:32 PM
The 2 guide bolts under the dust caps on the back of the caliper (near the 4 torx bolts) could be taken out to remove the whole caliper instead of disassembling the caliper in half.

barkerd427
01-04-2009, 04:28 PM
^^^exactly, but otherwise an excellent write up.

artinmoTTion
01-05-2009, 12:08 AM
excellent, thank you.

bloodstar57
01-05-2009, 07:56 AM
The 2 guide bolts under the dust caps on the back of the caliper (near the 4 torx bolts) could be taken out to remove the whole caliper instead of disassembling the caliper in half.

yup

golfvdude
01-05-2009, 04:00 PM
should be a sticky in the B7 A4 forum on all B7 diy's.

D-techniK
01-11-2009, 12:17 PM
Awesome write up! When do you plan on doing rears?

Subaru71
01-11-2009, 02:21 PM
anyone have the torque specs for the bolts?

supamannn99
01-11-2009, 03:03 PM
great writeup!! definitely will use when i get new rotors.

how bout sticky this?

Mikey_C
03-01-2009, 03:17 PM
This DIY is for the front brakes, but from what I understand the rears are the same except for the needing a caliper tool. When it comes time to do the rears I will add pics.





Great right up, will be a big help when I do the rear pads this weekends.

By caliper tool do you mean a piston retractor?

barkerd427
03-01-2009, 04:25 PM
Yes it is a piston retractor. The rears are different, obviously, but they aren't hard.

lokeh
07-06-2009, 05:40 PM
thanks for the writeup, nicely done!

did anyone ever post a rear writeup? or pretty much can go by this.

newb at installing brakes, but you don't need to bleed the brake lines for this at all? I was going to venture doing the rotors and brakes in near future. :)

fly300kts
07-06-2009, 05:45 PM
You need a special tool to retract the piston on the rear brakes

swsherif
09-01-2009, 07:01 AM
are there any torque spec's for all the above, plus do you have to replace the sensor wire after you unplug it, thanks , and very nice thread

swsherif
09-01-2009, 11:16 AM
I am wondering if I have to change the rotors every time I replace the brake pads, like right now I have a brake warning for the brake pads and I am going to replace it but when I touched the rotors, I found them smooth and not that thin, do you guys recommend changing the rotors any way, they are not cheep, but I don’t mind replacing them if it’s recommended.

another question, what is the best repair manual I should have and here to buy it, thanks

Jer
09-01-2009, 12:03 PM
I am wondering if I have to change the rotors every time I replace the brake pads, like right now I have a brake warning for the brake pads and I am going to replace it but when I touched the rotors, I found them smooth and not that thin, do you guys recommend changing the rotors any way, they are not cheep, but I don’t mind replacing them if it’s recommended.

another question, what is the best repair manual I should have and here to buy it, thanks

Turning your rotors is not the same thing as changing your rotors.

swsherif
09-01-2009, 12:21 PM
Turning your rotors is not the same thing as changing your rotors.


I know that, I am not going to turn it

Jer
09-01-2009, 12:25 PM
I know that, I am not going to turn it

Why wouldn't you?

swsherif
09-02-2009, 08:40 AM
Why wouldn't you?


oH I see what you saying, you are saying machining the rotors instead of replacing them, that's a good point, I just said machining is going to cost money as well plus the rotors are not that expensive they are like 1169$ made in Germany from the dealer, and the car is not old I would like to keep every thing in a good shape as long as I am going to do the work my self, I am not going to go cheep, and by the way I just finished the brake yesterday, every thing went well except the spring bracket on the brake caliper , it took me long time to remove it, but it’s ok now, plus I had to tight every thing up to 95 in/lb, I just was guessing I didn’t have any torque spec to go with, and I wanted to tight every thing to an equal torque, I didn’t have any oil came out of the brake oil container.

Jer
09-02-2009, 08:44 AM
You need to have the rotors turned EVERY time you change the pads. If you don't you will trash the pads in short order or worse. At some point they will be too thin to turn (as based on specifications which the place turning them will have) and you will have to replace them. There's really no reason to replace them otherwise and doing so is just wasting money. Buy some rotors and put them in the garage and take yours in to have turned and when they are to thin to turn change them out with the rotors you already have. As for paying $1,169 for a set of rotors... I only hope that's not US dollars because someone is making a TON of money off of you.

swsherif
09-02-2009, 10:07 AM
You need to have the rotors turned EVERY time you change the pads. If you don't you will trash the pads in short order or worse. At some point they will be too thin to turn (as based on specifications which the place turning them will have) and you will have to replace them. There's really no reason to replace them otherwise and doing so is just wasting money. Buy some rotors and put them in the garage and take yours in to have turned and when they are to thin to turn change them out with the rotors you already have. As for paying $1,169 for a set of rotors... I only hope that's not US dollars because someone is making a TON of money off of you.


i am ver very sorry it was a typo i ment $116.00 Canadian, and i like your idea about machining the rotors and keep them for when ever i need them , thanks ans sorry for the typo

swsherif
09-02-2009, 11:09 AM
You need to have the rotors turned EVERY time you change the pads. If you don't you will trash the pads in short order or worse. At some point they will be too thin to turn (as based on specifications which the place turning them will have) and you will have to replace them. There's really no reason to replace them otherwise and doing so is just wasting money. Buy some rotors and put them in the garage and take yours in to have turned and when they are to thin to turn change them out with the rotors you already have. As for paying $1,169 for a set of rotors... I only hope that's not US dollars because someone is making a TON of money off of you.


Talking about turning the rotors, do you know the minimum rotor thickness after turning? thanks

Jer
09-02-2009, 11:16 AM
Talking about turning the rotors, do you know the minimum rotor thickness after turning? thanks

No, your local shop that does rotor turning can tell you. There's really no reason to know what that is sitting here at your computer anyway since you won't be turning the rotor yourself. They will measure to make sure it's within compliance and then turn until completely resurfaced (no more lines or gouges) and then measure again. Law requires a minimum thickness for safety reasons so if you run your pads too long or get a rock stuck or something of that nature you can see how a rotor is quickly ruined since the whole thing doesn't have to be damaged, just one section deep enough that it can't be turned out.

swsherif
09-02-2009, 11:48 AM
No, your local shop that does rotor turning can tell you. There's really no reason to know what that is sitting here at your computer anyway since you won't be turning the rotor yourself. They will measure to make sure it's within compliance and then turn until completely resurfaced (no more lines or gouges) and then measure again. Law requires a minimum thickness for safety reasons so if you run your pads too long or get a rock stuck or something of that nature you can see how a rotor is quickly ruined since the whole thing doesn't have to be damaged, just one section deep enough that it can't be turned out.


thanks for your help , I will take my old rotors today for turning and keep them

Jer
09-02-2009, 11:53 AM
thanks for your help , I will take my old rotors today for turning and keep them

That's a good idea. Turning will usually set you back about $10USD per rotor so it's quite a bit cheaper than buying a new rotor which is over 5x more expensive.

adamc514
09-14-2009, 12:13 AM
are there any torque spec's for all the above

"Brake System
47 - Brake hoses and brake lines Tightening torques
Brake caliper FNR-G60 (front)
Brake caliper to brake carrier 30 Nm
Brake carrier to wheel bearing housing 190 Nm
Bleeder valve to brake caliper 10 Nm
Bleeder valve to brake caliper FNR-G60 15 Nm
Hydraulic unit with bracket to longitudinal member (Bosch 8.0) 10 Nm
ABS sensors to wheel bearing housing 10 Nm
Splash plates to wheel bearing housing 10 Nm

Rear brake caliper C41/C43 (rear)
Brake hose to brake caliper (banjo union with banjo bolt) 38 Nm
Brake caliper to brake carrier 35 Nm
Brake carrier to wheel bearing housing 75 Nm"

Some torque specs from my Bentley repair manual

swsherif
09-14-2009, 05:02 AM
"Brake System
47 - Brake hoses and brake lines Tightening torques
Brake caliper FNR-G60 (front)
Brake caliper to brake carrier 30 Nm
Brake carrier to wheel bearing housing 190 Nm
Bleeder valve to brake caliper 10 Nm
Bleeder valve to brake caliper FNR-G60 15 Nm
Hydraulic unit with bracket to longitudinal member (Bosch 8.0) 10 Nm
ABS sensors to wheel bearing housing 10 Nm
Splash plates to wheel bearing housing 10 Nm

Rear brake caliper C41/C43 (rear)
Brake hose to brake caliper (banjo union with banjo bolt) 38 Nm
Brake caliper to brake carrier 35 Nm
Brake carrier to wheel bearing housing 75 Nm"

Some torque specs from my Bentley repair manual

thanks a lot for your help, I think those Bentley repair manual come handy, aren't they?

skibumdc
09-14-2009, 06:04 AM
Why disassemble the entire caliper and them remove it from the carrier?

Wouldn't it be easier to
1) remove the sensor wire,
2) remove (2) 21mm bolts to get the caliper off of the carrier and zip tie out of the way
3) remove pad sensor wire and outside pad
4) push back piston with inside pad
5) remove old rotor and either turn at shop, or replace with new rotor
6) replace sensor wire and pads and then mount back to caliper carrier with (2) 21mm bolts?

vincent9993
10-07-2009, 07:08 AM
After my week-end at the track, I thought it would be a good idea to get new pads and discs in anticipations of replacing them soon.

I was looking at ECS website and there are quite a few options for pads and discs on their site for B7 A4 3.2.

Can someone tell me what the OEM disc and pads are on the ECS site?

felondnb
10-07-2009, 07:16 AM
Thanks dude - that's exactly what I was after!

Nice one [>_<]

KMc
10-28-2009, 09:10 AM
The 2 guide bolts under the dust caps on the back of the caliper (near the 4 torx bolts) could be taken out to remove the whole caliper instead of disassembling the caliper in half.

If I am seeing this correctly, your suggestion of removing the guide bolts would allow the caliper body to be removed, leaving the pad carrier still bolted in place. The pads can be removed/replaced and then the caliper body re-installed on top? Do you know what size tool is needed to remove the guide bolts?

KMHPaladin
10-28-2009, 09:34 AM
Replacing the pads with our caliper is straightforward and relatively simple (though not as easy as with Porsche calipers).

Remove caliper retaining clip, remove slide pin dust caps, loosen slide pins with 7mm hex socket (they just need to come out to the end of the dust cap). Spread caliper from carrier with screwdriver to get clearance, pull off caliper, done.

Be sure to remove the cap on your brake fluid reservoir if retracting pistons.

http://audiworld.com/tech/wheel137.shtml

KMc
10-28-2009, 09:56 AM
Replacing the pads with our caliper is straightforward and relatively simple (though not as easy as with Porsche calipers).

Remove caliper retaining clip, remove slide pin dust caps, loosen slide pins with 7mm hex socket (they just need to come out to the end of the dust cap). Spread caliper from carrier with screwdriver to get clearance, pull off caliper, done.

Be sure to remove the cap on your brake fluid reservoir if retracting pistons.

http://audiworld.com/tech/wheel137.shtml

Excellent. Thank you!

Adam@SPP
11-10-2009, 10:48 AM
shoulda replaced them with adam's rotors first! [;)]

http://www.audizine.com/forum/showthread.php?t=322963

www.adamsrotors.com

[az]

yimstab7
01-14-2010, 05:59 PM
my luck no pics when i need to do it

Pandoro
03-15-2010, 05:55 PM
sorry if this was already touched on but it doesnt seem clear to me. Instead of disassembling the caliper, there are 2 bolts that can be taken out in order to remove the caliper as a whole. What tool is needed in order to remove those two bolts? is it torx? hex? something else? Thanks in advance for all your help.

Latin Audi
03-29-2010, 11:03 AM
For those wondering about doing the rears. It is basically the same, (pistons screw in, not pushed in like the fronts) you just need to rent a tool such as this:

http://www.audizine.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=11060&d=1269881904

The two bolts that hold the caliper assembly in are a bitch to get to and they are on there tight! To retract the piston, I re-assembled the caliper + caliper assembly without the rotor. I did this to make it easier to screw the piston in vs it dangling from the brake line. This is shown in the picture below:

http://www.audizine.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=11059&d=1269881901

Latin Audi
03-29-2010, 11:05 AM
sorry if this was already touched on but it doesnt seem clear to me. Instead of disassembling the caliper, there are 2 bolts that can be taken out in order to remove the caliper as a whole. What tool is needed in order to remove those two bolts? is it torx? hex? something else? Thanks in advance for all your help.

The two bolts that hold the caliper assembly are held in by two 8mm allen bolts. They are very tough to get to, good luck!

Jer
03-29-2010, 11:08 AM
Why do you need to rent a tool kit? All you need is a C-clamp and the old pad to retract the piston. Just slowly compress the old pad back to the caliper using a C-clamp which will push the piston back into place. Keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir just in case the brakes were bled and fluid topped off before the pads were replaced new. If this is the case use a turkey baster type device to remove fluid as needed as you compress the pistons back into place. Then swap the new pads in place and you're good to go w/o any special tools needed.

Latin Audi
03-29-2010, 11:43 AM
Because the rear pistons screw in, unlike the fronts.

98ggti
03-29-2010, 11:55 AM
yeah, you have to push the piston in and turn it. There are two little notches on the piston. You can either use the tool, or a c-clamp and some needle nose pliers, but I wouldn't suggest the pliers. Its a pain in the ass.

Latin Audi
03-29-2010, 11:59 AM
^ Yep. Especially if your pads are well worn, as mine were, it might take quite a bit of force to screw/push them back. The tool I borrowed made it 10x easier.

illegitimus
03-29-2010, 02:49 PM
^ Yep. Especially if your pads are well worn, as mine were, it might take quite a bit of force to screw/push them back. The tool I borrowed made it 10x easier.

I wonder if an auto parts store can lend this tool, like AutoZone? I am also considering buying one. From what I can see it's got different size plates to fit other vehicles, correct? I've done brakes on toyota/lexus and there were no need for a special tool, luckily. Is it mainly on Euro cars?

Scout
03-29-2010, 08:31 PM
I think most auto parts stores should lend you this tool. I rented a kit from O'Reilly that looks just like the one above. Latin Audi is right that the two 8mm bolts are a bitch. I fought with the top one (which is the easier one) for an hour, got frustrated, and quit. I got worried that I was putting too much stress on the stuck bolt that the head might pop off, or that the hex head would round off. I'll probably just take my pads and rotors to the dealer. Hopefully they won't have an issue with installing pads and rotors that I provide. I did spray a bunch of penetrating oil on the bolts, so I might give it one more try when my attitude improves. I hope you have better luck than I did.

Latin Audi
03-30-2010, 07:24 AM
I wonder if an auto parts store can lend this tool, like AutoZone? I am also considering buying one. From what I can see it's got different size plates to fit other vehicles, correct? I've done brakes on toyota/lexus and there were no need for a special tool, luckily. Is it mainly on Euro cars?

Yea I borrowed it from O'reillys auto parts (Texas). It has many sized plates for different cars but not sure if its mainly European cars.

carguy138
03-31-2010, 06:34 PM
I just purchased everything to do the brakes on my A4 except for new rotors and plan to tackle the installation this weekend along with suspension. The rotors I have are not that worn even though the car has 46k miles. I was under the impression that I could simply take some 1600 grit sand paper along with some stones to remove any built up crap on the rotors (no high spots). After reading though this thread is seems like I should be purchasing a new set of rotors. Any truth to this? I am installing hawk HPS pads along with Motul 600 brake fluid.

This is according to Tire Rack and makes some sense...

"IMPORTANT REMINDER: Slotted, drilled or dimpled rotors offered as OEM replacements should not be considered appropriate for high-speed track use.

While grooved, drilled and slotted rotors offer an enhanced appearance and add some resistance to the boundary layer of gasses that can build up between the pad and rotor, they are not designed to withstand the extreme temperatures that are produced on the racetrack. If they are used on the track, it is very important that the rotors be carefully inspected and should not be driven on if even minor signs of deterioration are seen. Note, too, that if these products are used on the track they are not warrantable."

I've done many brake jobs on my dirt bike and mountain bike (Hayes hydraulic), so the same principles apply.

Also how are the ECS and zimmermann rotors on ecs? The ECS rotors are either slotted or slotted/drilled and the zimmermanns look similar to the OEM's. If there is a significant performance increase I would consider going with the ECS slotted/drilled rotors. If they are merely for looks in this application, then I'll pass and go for the OEMs. Is there a reasonable chance I would experience damage with them on the track and will they make a significant reduction in brake fade?

Jer
03-31-2010, 06:57 PM
Call around your area and see who turns rotors. Pay $5-$10 per rotor and save the life of your pads and increase braking performance. Using sandpaper to attempt to turn rotors yourself is a horrible idea. Order a spare set of rotors to keep on hand for when they tell you that your rotors are too thin. When that happens swap them out.

bug
05-02-2010, 09:59 AM
For those wondering about doing the rears. It is basically the same

I did my fronts a month or two ago, and just went to do the rears today. Had the tool to screw the piston back in and everything, but I got stuck because there doesn't seem to be enough room to remove the bottom bolt on the caliper without getting the emergency brake stuff back there out of the way... No one brought this up as an issue, so maybe i'm just dense, but how do you get that bottom bolt to clear the e-brake?

Unleaded20T
05-15-2010, 09:11 PM
Guys, i gotta tell you this is a wonderfull and well documented DIY and i hate to do this but i just replaced my pads but i still have the brake pad wear indiciator on my dashboard and i cant find a way to get rid of it..

Help!

illegitimus
05-15-2010, 09:48 PM
Guys, i gotta tell you this is a wonderfull and well documented DIY and i hate to do this but i just replaced my pads but i still have the brake pad wear indiciator on my dashboard and i cant find a way to get rid of it..

Help!

did you reconnect the sensor wire?

Unleaded20T
05-16-2010, 06:19 PM
did you reconnect the sensor wire?

Yes, that i did. I also checked the rear pads but they are more than 50%. I've searched the webb for a solution, some people with similar problem and they recommend to disconnect the battery to let the computer reboot but i am hesistant because i dont think that it will fix the problem.

illegitimus
05-31-2010, 07:21 PM
Yes, that i did. I also checked the rear pads but they are more than 50%. I've searched the webb for a solution, some people with similar problem and they recommend to disconnect the battery to let the computer reboot but i am hesistant because i dont think that it will fix the problem.
well, I did my fronts this weekend and the brake indicator disappeared the moment I started driving to bed the brakes in. So, there's definitely something not right with yours. One thing could be that the sensor wire came out of the pad if you did not wire it properly around and behind the brake caliper carrier and the brake line. I don't know if you could put the car on a lift and reach with your hand to feel where the wire is if it is loose or not. Otherwise, you need to take your wheels off.

Heratik
07-30-2010, 07:02 PM
Great writeup, had the chance to use it today. You should add that there is a good chance you'll need a drill for the T27 Torx screw. I really wish they would stop using these damn things, they are so aggravating.

Used Zimmermann rotors and Akebono euro pads btw. I'm looking forward to dust free running.

Spiff69
08-18-2010, 09:21 AM
My local shop told me today that he recommends against turning Audi rotors, that he doesn't even know of someone who will refinish them - that you should replace them or leave them be as long as they are not too thin. Is that a bad idea? Has anyone replaced just the pads?

Jer
08-18-2010, 09:46 AM
My local shop told me today that he recommends against turning Audi rotors, that he doesn't even know of someone who will refinish them - that you should replace them or leave them be as long as they are not too thin. Is that a bad idea? Has anyone replaced just the pads?

What reasoning did he give you? I bet he sells new rotors, right?

Adam@SPP
08-18-2010, 10:50 AM
keep us in mind!

Spiff69
08-18-2010, 07:45 PM
What reasoning did he give you? I bet he sells new rotors, right?

Well, let me first say that I really like this shop - they have treated me really, really well.

However, he said that german rotors are too hard to refinish and that he didn't know of anyone in the area that would do it. I don't think he was trying to sell new rotors necessarily. He said he would only recommend replacing them if he measured them and found them to be too thin.

Jer
08-18-2010, 10:53 PM
Well, let me first say that I really like this shop - they have treated me really, really well.

However, he said that german rotors are too hard to refinish and that he didn't know of anyone in the area that would do it. I don't think he was trying to sell new rotors necessarily. He said he would only recommend replacing them if he measured them and found them to be too thin.

I hate people that perpetuate the thought that just because something is made in Germany it's automatically more expensive to repair and work on. The bottom line is that rotors are rotors man. Steel is steel and ANY rotor can be turned until it's no longer thick enough to be safe. Period. Some that are slotted or drilled require a specific stone to turn but if you're just talking flat slugs any basic rotor turning lathe will turn any rotor... Audi included. I'm sure the place you go to is wonderful but he's misinformed on this particular topic. If I were you I would double check just about anything he says from here on out to be safe. It is your car and your money after all. Just because a guy is nice and has been in business for a while doesn't mean he knows what he's doing... he just knows more than most. I had an 'Audi guy' accost me in the parking lot at the indoor gun range the other day. He told me that if I needed anything to call him and handed me some business cards. Said he was big into Audis and knew them inside and out. Oh really? I asked. He says 'Yeah, I just did a quad turbo on an A6 and that thing would flat MOVE!' He rattled on about some more nonsensical bullshit and I politely nodded for a few minutes and then interrupted some BS story to tell him we had to get to our appointment (Chick-Fil-A). The point is that a majority of the population would have bought that load hook line and sinker. Educate yourself to avoid trusting your car/money to someone just because they sound like they know what their talking about and you don't know any better.

Adam@SPP
08-18-2010, 10:58 PM
I hate people that perpetuate the thought that just because something is made in Germany it's automatically more expensive to repair and work on. The bottom line is that rotors are rotors man.

...and that they are god's gift to manufacturing.
not everything german is top quality...not everything asian made is crap.
/rant & vent...well put tho, it's refreshing.

Spiff69
08-18-2010, 11:45 PM
I like that you prioritize Chick Fil'A as an appointment :)

Thanks for the advice. I guess I may have to look around. My sensor on the fronts just went off three days ago, but I'm waiting on the pads to come in. It seems that the consensus is that not refinishing the rotors will wear the pads down prematurely?

Adam - I'm assuming all the prices and options are updated on your site? What is your turnaround time from time of order?

zhemel
08-18-2010, 11:53 PM
I dont know that I have ever seen brakes done this way. I have always taken the calipers off in one piece. Learn something new everyday

Jer
08-19-2010, 12:31 AM
I like that you prioritize Chick Fil'A as an appointment :)

Thanks for the advice. I guess I may have to look around. My sensor on the fronts just went off three days ago, but I'm waiting on the pads to come in. It seems that the consensus is that not refinishing the rotors will wear the pads down prematurely?

Adam - I'm assuming all the prices and options are updated on your site? What is your turnaround time from time of order?


Yes, simply throwing new pads on w/o turning rotors will cause pads to wear substantially faster than on turned or new rotors.

Adam@SPP
08-19-2010, 12:36 AM
spiff, yes they are...click ORDER HERE for pricing.
...AR is custom made to order, 2-3 weeks upon payment.

ToyCeli22
08-20-2010, 01:42 PM
Great write up! I tried to give this a go last weekend only to find out that the rotors i had ordered did not have the smaller hole for the torx screw.

These are the ones i had ordered but the ones i received look a tad different.
http://www.europaparts.com/brake-rotor-front-coated-320x30-8e0615301ad.html

How important is it to have that hole and torx screw? Should I send them back?

TIA!

carguy138
08-20-2010, 02:35 PM
Just swapped out my Hawk Plus pads (track day) to my Hawk HPS's the other day and noticed today they are squealing a bit if I hit the brakes in the same repeatable manner. Guess I have to rip it apart again and re-grease everything damnit. By the way Hawk Plus pads are AWESOME, but unfortunately they squeal like a pig in shit.

illegitimus
08-20-2010, 05:29 PM
Great write up! I tried to give this a go last weekend only to find out that the rotors i had ordered did not have the smaller hole for the torx screw.

These are the ones i had ordered but the ones i received look a tad different.
http://www.europaparts.com/brake-rotor-front-coated-320x30-8e0615301ad.html

How important is it to have that hole and torx screw? Should I send them back?

TIA!

some say that set screw isn't really needed. I would probably agree, since the rotor is firmly clamped by the lug bolts to the wheel hub anyway. I am a stickler for doing things right, so I would probably get the right rotors if I were you.

Adam@SPP
08-25-2010, 03:16 PM
^ it's not needed...period.
it's a set screw purely in place for installation ease.
screw in, holds the rotor in place on the hub while you complete the brake job and/or mount the wheels.
it does nothing once the wheel is mounted.

redfred
10-23-2010, 02:49 PM
The audiworld instructions are the ones to follow. This was one of the easiest brake jobs I've done.

-drifty-
11-21-2010, 03:09 AM
I did my rear pads [wrench] and now finally got around to posting B7 A4 rear brake pad swap instructions, with pictures (http://forums.quattroworld.com/a4b7/msgs/4313.phtml)!

aaron1085
11-21-2010, 07:26 AM
I'm looking at upgrading my brake lines. Do I need anything special for this? I've been told some cars have to disable the ABS system using a VAG tool in order to install new SS brake lines...

carguy138
11-21-2010, 04:26 PM
I'm looking at upgrading my brake lines. Do I need anything special for this? I've been told some cars have to disable the ABS system using a VAG tool in order to install new SS brake lines...

If you try bleeding the lines with the car off, it will not open the ABS module and you will not get all of the old fluid out. The trick is to put the key in and turn it to the accessory position, and that will open the abs module.

I run HPS's for street (plus's in front for track), ECS SS lines, motul 600 fluid, and adams drilled rotors. The combo of this works awesome.

Make sure you get the power bleeder off of ECS and do not exceed more than 15-17 PSI, it makes the process much easier. Also wear eye protection. I was in a hurry and got a bunch of brake fluid in my eye when the hose slipped off the nipple on the caliper and got a bunch of that crap in my eye. Couldn't see straight for several days.

Adam@SPP
11-21-2010, 04:39 PM
feel free to let is know about pads & lines...we do those too!

4ty-phive
12-10-2010, 09:52 PM
Thank you so much sir

Grada89
02-27-2011, 09:03 PM
Just did my discs/pads yesterday. Funny thing is the first side took me about 1 1/2 hours while the second side took like 35 min. Once you know what you're doing its quite easy. Good DIY but I didnt disasemble the caliper. Just removed it all at once. Found it to be easier and way faster.

Mrcsels
03-14-2011, 06:31 PM
Thank you! This is exactly what I was looking for.

dantm
06-13-2011, 04:06 PM
Question for you guys ** if replacing the rotors, pads, calipers, wouldn't there be a way to remove the whole assembly? I assume that the rotor is free on the hub (other than the torx screw?) and then all we need is to remove some bolts holding the caliper carrier to the back of the suspension/control arm and the whole caliper/pads/rotor assembly should come right out ** correct?

Thank you!

DBMoody18
06-14-2011, 04:28 AM
Great DIY! Whole project front and rear only took about an hour. The front retainer clips are more than meets the eye. Is there a trick? If I didn't have four hands on it I'm not sure how I would have gotten it.

cujo05
11-06-2011, 03:23 AM
Thanks a ton for the DIY , just used this yesterday. Only difference is that I too only removed the two 21mm bolts instead of disassembling the caliper. I will say that by not disassembling the caliper in half, retracting the piston is made sinificantly easier by just getting a loaner tool from Autozone. Used a coarse sanding attachment on an air tool to deglaze the rotors. As another member stated, the first side took a while but the second side went extremely quick. One tip, if you are going to tackle this without air tools have some muscle ready. Those two 21mm bolts took most of my time trying to get them free.

jjvwg
07-11-2012, 06:30 PM
Does anyone know the torque specs for the torx bolts that hold the caliper halves together? saw the torque listing on the first page but didnt see those. also, should loctite be used on any of these bolts? thanks for the info guys.

fordyoz
08-22-2012, 09:48 AM
courtesy of SkyFire:

http://www.audizine.com/forum/showthread.php/500341-Just-did-the-front-brakes-some-observations-and-tips

2006SLine
12-23-2012, 02:27 PM
Ok, pretty annoyed with the first DIY poster that said the rear brakes are exactly like the front. They are not. You don't need the T55 Torx and the rotor is a T27, not T30. So, this may be a trivial question, but anyone know the size of the allen bolt holding the caliper carrier onto the trailing arm? I looked around and couldn't find anything exact, but sounds like it may be 7mm? Can someone confirm possibly?

Thanks and to audizine, don't make something a "sticky" unless you know the info is correct, just wasted 2 hours because of this guys saying one thing but the facts being something else.

naiku
12-26-2012, 06:17 PM
Ok, pretty annoyed with the first DIY poster that said the rear brakes are exactly like the front. They are not. You don't need the T55 Torx and the rotor is a T27, not T30. So, this may be a trivial question, but anyone know the size of the allen bolt holding the caliper carrier onto the trailing arm? I looked around and couldn't find anything exact, but sounds like it may be 7mm? Can someone confirm possibly?

Thanks and to audizine, don't make something a "sticky" unless you know the info is correct, just wasted 2 hours because of this guys saying one thing but the facts being something else.

You should give the OP a bit of slack, I have typically found that a lot of the sizes listed in DIY's are different on my car to those posted. The way I see it, having to find a different size wrench is a pretty minor problem than having to figure out everything on my own.

I can't remember if the allen on mine is 7 or 8mm, but it is one of those 2. I ended up grinding an allen wrench down a little shorter to fit in there a little better..

crew
04-21-2013, 08:53 AM
The hex is most definitely 7mm, which is not as common a size as 8mm. I found mine at Sears, but also realized that you can use a T45 as well, the bolt is designed to accept both, and the T45 is much more readily available at most hardware stores.

I bought the 7mm and used it no prob, but realized that the T45 I bought for the window reg would've worked as well.

sa_seahawker
04-21-2013, 09:46 AM
I agree with all...this is a great writeup.

I did notice something and it got me thinking. I always like the way new shiny rotors look on my car. The problem is that the vent and inner mounting ring are always the first thing to start building up surface rust. Has anyone ever thought about masking off the contact surface and shooting the aforementioned sections with some silver or black caliper paint or something? Seems like it would be a great way to clean up the overall wheel appearance.

Parts I was talking about:
http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i267/sa_seahawker/IMG_0510_zpscacf7385.jpg

crew
04-21-2013, 10:34 AM
I fully agree that it would look better.. can't image how difficult it would be to mask properly, though. I imagine any overspray would burn off eventually.

I've heard of people using the hi-temp caliper paint to do rotors, that's probably where they painted them!

B7Joe
05-02-2013, 10:55 AM
I've done it. Granted I'm in SoCal, but they seemed to last that way forever. I didn't even prep them. Just a quick wash down the day before, masked and painted with high-heat black paint. You can get a bit of overspray on them and its no prob, but I personally would not just spray them without masking. It's very easy.

//S POWER
07-16-2014, 07:44 AM
..................Please let me know if I missed anything.

Good write up Asimko

Additional step required for new brake installations

Step Twenty One: Brake Bedding Procedure

http://www.pagidracing.com/fileadmin/pagidracing/content_data/downloads/pagid_bedding_in_procedure.pdf